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  1. #1

    Default Help planning 7th grade - pelt me with upper level resources

    So I have been homeschooling for 4 years and I have never felt so unsure of my planning for the upcoming year. I feel like I need to be more organized and a bit more formal as he is nearing HS. I know the younger level resources, and am fairly comfortable planning for my 2nd grader, but I don't know where to look for good upper level resources.

    Those of you who have older kids, can you share with me your favorite curriculums and resources? My son loves history and science, and needs help with writing.

  2. T4L In Forum Oct19
  3. #2

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    That's a pretty general order. What did you do last year? Are there any particular subjects you're hoping to cover? Are you happy with your math or do you need algebra or pre-algebra suggestions as well?

    We always like Brave Writer. Faltering Ownership is okay for middle school. The Boomerang is good for middle schoolers. We also used a little book from Prufrock Press called Twisting Arms about essays that I liked a lot. Prufrock has a great serious about recent American history - Exploring America in (decade) - which I think is excellent. Um, I think Middle School Chemistry from ACS is really good and that the TOPS units for middle school are pretty decent. Figuratively Speaking is a good middle school literary elements book. If you have never done Hakim's Story of Science, that's a good program. I think Build Your Library's 7th and 8th grade years are excellent - amazing book choices.

    But so much of this depends on you, your kid, and what you need...
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  4. #3

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    Sorry I can't help with any ideas for 7th grade as we are only at 5th, but in case you are interested, I just got an email from Bravewriter this morning about their Homeschool Alliance. It said that in July they focus on planning with weekly webinars and planning based on you/your kids personalities, interests, and strengths. And apparently you can get a free trial (7 days if you sign up for a monthly subscription), and can cancel at any time. Hopefully they does not sound all advertise-ish. I am in no way linked with Bravewriter commercially. We just use some of their stuff and I get emails and it happened to suit what your problem is
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  5. #4

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    Thank you, I will look into that. I do poetry tea but have never fully used Bravewriter.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by magicsonata View Post
    Those of you who have older kids, can you share with me your favorite curriculums and resources? My son loves history and science, and needs help with writing.
    As farrar stated, that's a pretty open question. Since he's middle school age, I would both involve him in the planning and allow him some input as to WHAT he studies. No need to worry about what HAS to be covered--that can wait until high school.

    So, what era(s) in history does he want to learn about? What part of science excites him (animals, space, geology, physics)? Does he like hands-on, prefer texts or living books, does well with computer-based curriculum?
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  7. #6

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    Thank you! We have used a variety of things and have been very eclectic mostly child led. Most curriculums have been used a bit as a jump off point then dropped. As he is older I feel like we need more structure, or at least I need to be a bit more guiding, and I think that we need to actually follow something through.

    My DS is 2e, strengths Math, Science, History, weakness writing (dysgraphia). This is one reason we normally end up diverging from the curriculum, he comperhends and can talk about subjects at a much higher level than he ability to output, ie write a response/paragraph etc. We are looking for more local support for his dysgraphia so I don't need sugestions there but I mention it as part of who he is and I guess why I am feeling so lost. I don't think I can keep letting him discuss and not write things at this point, and I am partly regretting letting it go this far.

    Those are all good suggestions! I had totally forgotten about Hakims Story of Science, I researched it a few years ago and decided to wait until he was older. I like the build your library concept so I will look into that as well. Thank you for letting me know some of your favorite resources!

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    As farrar stated, that's a pretty open question. Since he's middle school age, I would both involve him in the planning and allow him some input as to WHAT he studies. No need to worry about what HAS to be covered--that can wait until high school.

    So, what era(s) in history does he want to learn about? What part of science excites him (animals, space, geology, physics)? Does he like hands-on, prefer texts or living books, does well with computer-based curriculum?
    We do a lot of read alouds, he still loves our time together (I do too! though it is harder with a younger one that needs much more support), especally historical fiction. He learns best auditory and hands on, so we frequently read aloud. He has liked some text books as long as they are engaging. Computer-based curriculum irritates him, but there are somethings I encourage him to do any way as computers are part of life, and playing video games doesn't count as computer skills

    He would like to do either US history or Modern history (WWI-ish on). However, if there is a series that needed to start earlier he would be okay with that as well. Science he likes physics, chemistry and space. He loves animals but I am not sure he wantes to study them anymore.

    He has normally been part of the planning process and will be this time too, I just wanted to have some ideas to bring to him first.

  9. #8

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    My son has similar issues with dysgraphia, and while it does not solve all problems, obviously, I find giving typed assignments for writing has worked really well. In addition, writing on a white board is easier for him than on paper. We did 7th grade last year and I also felt like we needed to refocus on writing fundamentals.

    We used the Killgallon Middle School Sentence book as a writing resource. I really liked it, and my son liked it too. My son is not good with "real" literature, but he can handle smallish doses of it. Basically, it involves being introduced (or reviewing) grammar in the context of literary sentences. My son enjoys grammar much more than literature, so this worked in our favor as the grammar aspect is the one actively discussed and the literature serves only as examples.

    You do a few exercises and also write your own sentences based on the model given. This was perfect for my son. It gave him higher quality sentence exposure, without the tedium of copy work or having to read entire books he probably would not like. I really noticed the improvement in the quality of his sentences by the end of the school year.

    Another thing that helped was the paragraph writing sections of the Critical Thinking Co. Word Root books. It is meant primarily as a vocabulary building resource based on Latin and Greek word parts. That said, my son enjoys linguistics so he was willing to do the optional writing portion where you incorporate the vocabulary words into a paragraph.

  10. #9

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    Has your son read the Horrible Histories / Horrible Science books?
    They would lack the structure of a curriculum, but were very engaging to my older son. And they would give a British bias, instead of an American bias, to history.
    I found Joy Hakimís History of US to be tolerable. There are materials (teachers guides, workbooks) you can get to make it more of an official feeling curriculum.
    My seventh grader is about to embark on Hakimís history of the world through Science for next year. We will be using BYL8 to help guide us along and give us our reading. We really enjoyed all the books from BYL7 - World Geography, last year. If reading is highly enjoyable for your son, you might look at that. BYL will cover everything except electives and math. (BYL7 included Chemistry, but it wasnt tied into the rest of the curriculum, and we didnt do it.) (We did BYL7 in 6th grade because it matched the world tour the baby was doing in Kinder... not because of special snowflakes or BYL not being rigorous enough )
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

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Help planning 7th grade - pelt me with upper level resources