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Thread: science??

  1. #11

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    I also think you shouldn't really mix science and faith. I get why some people do it, but... It's not really science.

    I think you may also not be aware that evolution is not the only issue that Christian textbooks will be dealing with in a different manner. Geology and the age of the earth is another obvious one. However, Christian textbooks also present climate change as a lie. They often have misleading or false information about other things, like human anatomy, statistics, cell biology, and more. Evolution is also so fundamental to biology that leaving it out gets weird fast. You end up focusing on classification instead of adaptation and change. Same with geology. It becomes the study of vocabulary of rocks and dirt instead of the story of how the earth is changing and forming and reforming all the time. That's a pretty massive difference.

    As for when you need to get serious about science... I mean, in high school?
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  3. #12

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    I absolutely want them to learn fact base science and unbias social studies. I'm going to stop science now also and start using some of the online resources. I liked the one stop shop of CLE and that everyday was laid out, no planning and little prep. but I've felt for a while it just wasn't the right fit. we will still use math and language arts but the wording in their 3rd grade social studies was what really pushed it over the edge for me. I think my kids will enjoy doing something different and with more color. I appreciate everyone's honest options, thank you. I've tried asking for help in other forums and got verses and prayers

  4. #13

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    I would consider getting some science experiment books, have some fun, make some messes and thane be it for the day.

    These are some I would consider

    Everything Kids Easy Science Experiments

    Kitchen Science Lab

    Outdoor Science Lab

    DK 101 Great Science Experiments

    Maker Lab Project

    101 Coolest Simple Science Experiments:

    Also check out the books from Nomad press. They are wonderful.
    https://nomadpress.net/nomadpress-bo...ubject=science
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  5. #14

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    We did the Magic School Bus Science Club The Young Scientists Club - Magic School Bus Science Club monthly for 1 year and then supplemented with The Magic School Bus books and the TV show (they have a new reboot on Netflix too), Wild Kratts and Bill Nye the Science Guy. It was great for those ages and they really learned a lot.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  6. #15

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    thank you for your suggestions and support.

    So far I think i will use building foundations of scientific understanding and Usborne science encyclopedia as spines. i also like kidsdiscover.com and will use it along side of my spines. if anyone used BFSU or kidsdiscover.com before let me know your thoughts and any suggestions.

  7. #16

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    Quick question about SOTW does it skip around time or in sequence?

  8. #17

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    Real Science 4 Kids is seriously the most comprehensive that Iíve found for the younger grades. If you really want to give it a go, but the price is the only thing keeping you back message me. I have book 4, and Iím moving so Iím trying to de-stash, lol. It shouldnít be too complicated to use for all of your kiddos at the same time - my 5 year old would do book 4 with my 4th graders.

  9. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmia5 View Post
    Quick question about SOTW does it skip around time or in sequence?
    It does both. For the most part it is sequential but sometimes it will feel like it skips around as it examines different parts of the world in the same time period. So you might study one part of the world up to the end of a time period and then jump back a little and study a different part of the world in the same time period. I didn't find that this detracted from the flow of the book at all but I know some people who don't like this jumping around.

  10. #19

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    We have the Usborne Science Encyclopedia, and my kids love sitting down and just picking a random section to read and going through the web links.

    We have also used BFSU in the past. You can buy the pdf online somewhere for cheaper than the book, which is what I did. I actually really like how it teaches. We gave up on it because it was just so parent intensive to plan. You need to go through and get what you can from the suggested books from the library, and read the entire lesson, and have a plan of what you are going to do. It does not really give that to you.

    From that, we went on to RSO because I wanted something that was less parent intensive. However, neither of myself or my older daughter really like it (me as the teacher and a scientist, or her as the learner). It is fine to do occasionally, but I much prefer how BFSU presents science. I plan to really sit down and go through BFSU and make a long-term plan for it so that I can use it with my younger daughter.

    BFSU jumps around from area to area in science, and builds on prior understanding/learning to make connections. Whereas RSO focuses on only one area of science at a time, unless you buy multiple areas and somehow blend them all together. I prefer the BFSU method, it seems more natural. There is a flow chart in BFSU that shows how you could go from one topic to another. Obviously there are multiple paths that you could take. I did find a suggested order for the lessons it, and if you are interested I could send it to you via message.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

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  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by bellebookeandcandle View Post
    Real Science 4 Kids is seriously the most comprehensive that I’ve found for the younger grades. If you really want to give it a go, but the price is the only thing keeping you back message me. I have book 4, and I’m moving so I’m trying to de-stash, lol. It shouldn’t be too complicated to use for all of your kiddos at the same time - my 5 year old would do book 4 with my 4th graders.
    I dont understand how something that doesnt address big history, or evolution, could be seen as comprehensive?
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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