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  1. #1

    Default Phonics help / games for kid that doesnt speak well.

    My baby (now 5) has severe apraxia that makes speaking difficult for him. We are working on reading (he is motivated, he gets the idea, etc) but he is continually stalled by all the motor effort involved with sounding out words. (Like we talk about transcribing our kids thoughts to take away the added layer of them having to write, when writing is still a monumental effort.)
    He understands all the letter sounds, so that isnt an issue. We were working through Explode the Code, and misplaced the workbook. I received a replacement, and he wanted to start at the beginning of it.... and I realised he still has to labor through the early lessons. The blending of the words isnt coming any faster. (It took him a timed minute to work out the sounds and blending for R-A-N.)

    Does anyone know any online / tablet games that produce the sounds so that the kid doesnt have to? Or any other visual-oriented phonics programs? Sight words give him no trouble at all, but Im very apprehensive about using a “whole language” approach to literacy instead of phonics.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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  3. #2

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    What does your speech therapist recommend?

    Ours recommended Endless ABC, Endless reader, Wordplay, Articulation Station, Phonics Studio, Word Families, Phonics Genius ...there might be even more now.
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

  4. #3

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    My 5yo also has speech apraxia. He has been in speech therapy since he was just shy of 2 years old. He has an interest in learning to read and knows his letter sounds but I'm not pushing him at all. If he asks to sound out a word, we sound it out together. We play phonemic awareness games. He's getting better at blending but he still struggles so I do not expect him to sound out anything on his own unless he wants to try.

    A five year old child without speech issues could still just be not ready to blend. Some kids just don't become proficient at blending until they are 6 or 7 years old and there is nothing at all wrong with them. Mine that weren't ready at 5 spent kindergarten practicing writing letters and developing phonemic awareness. All but one could read fluently at grade level by the end of first grade regardless of whether or not they could blend at 5 years old.

    We use a lot of the apps Oksana mentioned. Ds also likes watching Alphablocks on Youtube which exposes him to a lot of blending. We also still have the old LeapFrog Talking Words Factory that all my kids enjoyed watching in preschool and early elementary.

    I also purchased this phonemic awareness game kit by Make Take Teach from TpT. It has been great for speech therapy practice and phonemic awareness.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Do you guys already do Teach Your Monster to Read? They do the sounds for you. <3
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by TFZ View Post
    Do you guys already do Teach Your Monster to Read? They do the sounds for you. <3
    We've tried but online games a problem for us. We have horrible internet out here in the boonies and the game constantly locks up due to our slow connection. The app does the same thing. Ds loses interest waiting for it to load lol!

  7. #6

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    Our speech therapist says reading isnt their knowledge area. Our charter’s reading specialist says “he’s 5, its not a problem yet”. (I assume he thinks Im trying to push DS faster than hes ready to go.)

    He enjoys Teach Your Monster to Read, but after a certain point, hes been ready to start over. I consider that to be the point of how far his “readiness” goes. (Hes been playing it for over a year, intermittently.)

    We have done the leapfrog vidoes, and DS is “beyond” matching letters with their sounds.
    Somewhat ironically, he knows his common sight words (like the, on, is, and...), which are exactly the words he omits from his everyday speech.

    Kids with apraxia are at higher risk for literacy problems; I guess I am worried that he will miss the developmental window that Im sure he is going through now. He wants to read, to spell... but when his lips and jaw arent cooperating when he is trying to put sounds together, its terribly discouraging for me. He is a trooper, and doesnt seem discouraged or frustrated. I dont want him to get to the point where he gives up as it being too difficult an activity.

    I will check out more of the app suggestions, thanks!
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    We have done the leapfrog vidoes, and DS is “beyond” matching letters with their sounds.
    I'm not talking about the Letter Factory video where they just introduce the letter sounds. I'm talking about the Talking Words Factory and Code Word Caper videos where they assume letter sounds are known and they blend sounds into words, introduce the silent e and touch on common phonograms and blends. My son is beyond the Letter Factory video as well, but he's at the perfect stage for hearing blending modeled for him over and over again like they do in Talking Words Factory.

    Our SLP is also a reading specialist and apraxia is what she did her dissertation/research project on for her master's degree. What she really wants us working on is phonemic and phonological awareness as he transitions from preschool to school age. Hearing sounds, manipulating sounds, "gluing and ungluing" words (also known as blending and segmenting)... all the phonemic awareness skills that most kids pick up on quickly and easily when they are ready (which can be anywhere between preschool and second grade for most kids). Just like an apraxia child may need 5 times as many exposures to a sound than a developmentally normal child needs before they master the sound, they also need more exposure to phonemic and phonological awareness skills before they master them.

    I forgot about Between the Lions, that is another good program for exposure to blending and phonemic and phonological awareness.

  9. #8

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    Our SLP (with an MS too) recommends doing more reading and spelling now when DD is 5 then would be advisable for a 5yo without speech issues. If they are working on a /g/ sound, she wants DD to see that letter g, and to see it in the words she is working on (in the beginning, middle, end).

    To help her blend, I also came up with a game where I speak in letters or sounds, and she has to tell me the words. Instead of asking 'Do you want a banana' I would say do you want a b-a-n-a-n-a'...you get it. It takes a lot of repetitions, but she is starting to blend.

    Also, DD5 went through the whole "Teach your monster to read' thing at least twice and it did not translate to an ability to blend or read in real life.
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

  10. #9

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    I don't think you're going to miss a developmental window, especially not with everything you're doing.

    The only other suggestion I have is Sound Literacy, which I know is supposed to be the best of the iPad apps for O-G style phonics.
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    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farrarwilliams View Post
    I don't think you're going to miss a developmental window, especially not with everything you're doing.
    ^^^This!^^^

    Did I tell you about the kid I had in first grade who didn't speak all year? I feel like I did before, but if I didn't, it's my favorite teaching memory -

    He was so nice and would laugh along with the other kids, though he didn't really make a laughing sound. He would whisper to me, but it was so hard for him to communicate. I'm not sure what his speech diagnosis was, but ugh, it broke my heart. He was so sweet. Then the last week of school (after his first year of speech therapy, why they didn't put him in when he was in K is beyond me) he popped up and said something hilariously funny. The whole class cracked up and was so excited that he spoke! I choked up - but totally played it off. I wish I could remember what he said. I have chills thinking about him.

    Anyway, never spoke. Would only whisper to me. Did just fine in first grade. He passed his tests and read on-level books. I don't think he had support at home, if I remember correctly. You keep at it. Things will happen. He will learn to read even if he doesn't read out loud. Pointing and writing and rearranging letter cards might come first. He can hear it in his head. With all you're doing for him, it will happen.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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Phonics help / games for kid that doesnt speak well.