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  1. #11

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    I am so glad that things are improving for you guys. The English language is so funny with pronunciation, we are now living near St. Louis and there are a lot of southerners around here. My DS9 is named Ben and he often doesn't respond to people when then call him Bin (I am from Wisconsin and my DH grew up in New Jersey and CT so we say the short E not short I).

    What do you do when you kid is a great reader and has good fluency, but just won't read? I haven't been pushing it, but am worried that we will start losing the gains we had from last year. He said he has read all these books from the library at his school last year because he was always done with his work early, but I am not sure I believe him. If I have him read a page to me, he reads easily and without mistakes so it isn't a decoding or comprehension issue.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

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  3. #12

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    Is it an issue with reading or does he not like the selection? Is he moving away from fiction? If he is not liking fiction, there are some great non-fiction "choose your own adventure" stories. (If you are talking about DS8).

    I am also using audio books to maintain interest and read more challenging books and make it more interesting, more variety. I have decided we are reading all of the classics and the Newberry award winners via audio book. Some are too advanced for DS, some I think he would not be interested to read alone.


    Lately, DS' choices in books have been on the theme of disasters and Star Wars. Sometimes I wonder how many different ways he can read the Star Wars story, but I have given up that idea and just let him read as many different Stars Wars themed books as he likes. As long as he keeps progressing. Also, I recently purchased a subscription to the app Epic which has a huge selection for kids. When it first came out I was pretty disappointed, but the availability of quality books has gone up. (Though the marginal quality ones are still there.)
    Last edited by Mariam; 10-26-2017 at 02:21 PM. Reason: incomplete thought
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  4. #13

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    yes Miriam it does seem to be a selection issue. It also seems to be a since Mom "picked" the book I just won't read it. He does like the choose your own adventure kinds and we are reading Fablehaven out loud in the evening. But we are doing Esperanza Rising for Bravewriter and he just hates the book, either me or him reading it. I think it maybe solely that it is a girl protagonist. I think we just need a bit more deschooling and snuggling and less worry.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  5. #14

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    I would read a book like Esperanza Rising aloud unless a child that age was really a motivated reader. And it's okay if you drop it. I do think it's important for boys to read girl protagonists, but not every book has to resonate with every reader. (Like, maybe he'd enjoy The True Meaning of Smekday... that's one of my top suggestions for a girl protagonist story likely to appeal to a boy.)

    I'd keep pushing the reading, but let him choose. And I'd keep trying out "literature" books like the Arrow or Newbery titles but I'd keep them as audio or read alouds unless he's enthused.

    And yeah, don't worry too much as long as he's reading some.
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  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by HawaiiGeek View Post
    yes Miriam it does seem to be a selection issue. It also seems to be a since Mom "picked" the book I just won't read it. He does like the choose your own adventure kinds and we are reading Fablehaven out loud in the evening. But we are doing Esperanza Rising for Bravewriter and he just hates the book, either me or him reading it. I think it maybe solely that it is a girl protagonist. I think we just need a bit more deschooling and snuggling and less worry.

    fWIW, I've found sometimes female protagonist combined with adventure go over well around here. Off the top of my head - Sophia's War, Where the Mountain Meets the Moon.
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

  7. #16

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    He loved The War That Saved my Life and that had a female protagonist. It seems that some of the issue with Esperanza Rising is that he is worried about her and is upset that her dad died and that her mom is sick. So I guess we need upbeat books.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by HawaiiGeek View Post
    He loved The War That Saved my Life and that had a female protagonist. It seems that some of the issue with Esperanza Rising is that he is worried about her and is upset that her dad died and that her mom is sick. So I guess we need upbeat books.
    We have a giggle poking fun at Newberry books sometimes. Kids see the sticker and say something like "brace yourself, someone dies in this book."
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
    Year 8

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