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  1. #1

    Default Kindergarten math lesson plans?

    Would anyone care to share what they're doing for K math? We are on a pretty tight budget and while I think math-u-see looks super cool, I just feel like that money could be better spent elsewhere. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't K just things like simple addition/subtraction, learning time, money, stuff like that? I would love if I could piece together something with simple lesson plans and add in a basic workbook (180 Days of Math is good from what I've heard). Does anyone know of some simple lesson plans that could help me teach her these concepts? Thanks!

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    Oh and we also have a 1-120 chart and 100 little wood blocks for counting.

  4. #3

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    No matter how terrorized you have become of Common Core (cue thunder!), they are simply a list of what your X grader should be able to do at each year.
    Kindergarten Ľ Counting & Cardinality | Common Core State Standards Initiative

    There are the standards, and you can easily make up your own activities to cover them. No workbooks required, although white boards with dry erase markers are loved in our house.

    That said, we went with Singapore Math - and are still using it. The workbooks (two per year) are about $15 each I think. (If youre looking for price comparisons.)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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    Thank you! Do you mind sharing which workbooks you're using? There's 3 on their website, earlybird cc, earlybird standard, and essential math. I'm afraid I'm not sure what the differences are.

  6. #5

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    I use McRuffy Math Kindergarten Math Lesson Plans | Kindergarten Basic Math Card Set

    I've been using it for 3 years. This kids love it, I like teaching it, and it works.

    It is a mix between Saxon, Right Start and MATHusee.

    It is not well known but it has been a life saver here.
    ~*~*Marta, mom to 5 boys.
    DS 1 ( 19, has his associates' degree and is off to college)
    DS 2 (17 and dual enrollment in college)
    Keegan (15 and enrolled in a PPP but still has home classes)
    Sully (10 years, 4th grade)
    Finn, (9 years, 3rd grade)

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    I didn't do an "official" k with DD, but for math we counted everything. I did buy some flashcards in the dollar spot at target, and used whatever was lying around the house to help her work out the problems, when she got the hang of adding things together, I showed her how to subtract. M&Ms were a favorite, I'd let her eat one if she did the problem correctly and explain it to me. (5+3=8 "I take 5 and put it in a pile, then take 3 and put it in a pile, then I push it together and it's 8!" type of explanation) Just with practice she started memorizing them. For time, I bought her a learning watch that has the minute and hour hand labeled and the minutes written around the edge. I would (and still do) ask her to tell me what time it is throughout the day and help her figure out how to read it. (Where's the little hand? Where's the big hand?, etc) Money we are still working on, but she can identify denominations and sometimes we use pennies to do math.

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    There are lots of threads here are on Singapore math levels... I started sometime in Kindergarten (while preparing for birth of my baby) with the workbook 1b. We used Standards Edition, which is California Standards, but I dont think it matters which you choose. I can relate to when I started, just wanting to be told what to do.

    It was a lot of playing with counters (a bin of a mix of little cats and dogs), making patterns, that sort of thing. I went right down the CCSS list checking things off as we did them.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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    We tried MUS and we're not impressed. We ended up not using a curriculum and instead played games to learn math skills and bought some workbooks from the dollar store. We found the best way was reading stories with math, as well as playing games worked the best.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    I'm going to so the activities in What your Kindergartener Needs to Know. There are 30 lessons covering: Patterns, Number Sense, Money, Computation, Measurement, and Geometry. Most of them just need simple household objects. Along with that we will be reading some kids math literature weekly (I will edit with a link), cooking, and playing apps and games. I have the Life of Fred books, too (which are non-secular but many people here enjoy them), and we'll go through those when/if he's interested. Our math costs will be very minimal - library and used for the textbooks. When he's mastered this I'll jump him to first grade Singapore or Math in Focus (Singapore for PS) whatever I can find cheaper, haha.

    Here are some links for math literature:
    Math Picture Books (Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd Grades)
    The Elementary Math Maniac: Monday Math Literature Volume 52!
    Last edited by TFZ; 05-25-2016 at 06:03 PM.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  11. #10

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    In Kinder pretty much all we did was lots of the games and activities from the book Bringing Math Home. You can pick up a copy used on half.com for 75 cents plus $4 shipping. We also read a lot of living math stories from the library. Reader lists for living math books abound, but here is one. Reader Lists

    In 1st I added in a lot of the activities and games from the videos on Education Unboxed. You will need Cuisenaire Rods for those (she recommends this set: Amazon.com: Learning Resources Cuisenaire Rods Small Group Set: Wood: Office Products) If you liked MUS, I would bet you would like her stuff.

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Kindergarten math lesson plans?