Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1

    Red face Walk me through curriculum choices

    Hi, 3rd yr cyber school vet here. My daughter is entering 4th grade next yr, and my son enters K. For the first half of the year (possibly the entire year) we are planning on putting both in public school. My daughter did public K and switched to private cyber from 1st gr on and that worked very well for us. So we will try the same plan with our soon to be K age son. We are moving to a new state this summer before school begins. Thats one reason we want our daughter to try public at least for a little bit, to get to know the area and meet people. But mostly because we see some issues with her in getting very lost in group settings, having trouble following directions with school work at home and in group settings, and dealing with groups of people socially. She has a very very hard time keeping up in social settings and communicating her thoughts. She is very bright, happy, excellent grades and comprehension beyond her age, well behaved, but is really lacking confidence in group situations, its like a light switch that goes on and off. We feel that she needs to be exposed to more of that.

    Following this coming year our hope is to go back to home education. Right now and the past 3 yrs she's been in private K12, icademy. I love the curriculum, the choices especially with history and art. We love the online videos and lessons. We don't like the volume of work however. Most days Just the core subjects take 4-5 hrs. Then you add on your extras, (language, art, etc), then forget if you just want to have time to freely read a book for pleasure (which I encourage as must as she can), or paint a picture for fun not an assignment. You're talking 6-7 hrs. Even all public school teachers I speak to tell me that is alot for a 3rd grader and way more than a public school covers.

    On top of this she seems to require so much one on one. Its not that I don't want to give that to her, but I feel like its become such a crutch that she has to overcome. I've seen her read a math problem 6 times and absolutely nothing is getting absorbed, she freezes. Then I sit with her and read some while she reads some and she can do it right, every time even without any help from me whatsoever..just reading for her. This concerns me. So is she truly not ready for independence, or is an emotional dependency, or laziness? Does she need to be put in a situation where she will get some one on one, but for the most part she will have to keep up with the class and she'll see others doing the same? She is very similar to my personality, and that classroom setting aspect benefited me. It gave me confidence to see other kids my age that were 'getting it' even though it was hard.

    As for cyber, I see the advancement in general knowledge, especially about the world and about history and language. However I do not see any advancement in decision making, following through, following directions and steps. I see her behind in those areas. Those are the areas I care about.
    So I'm at a cross roads wondering what a better curriculum could be for 5th grade, and also for my son who would then be in 1st grade. My kids are SO visual so I would really like something that involves online work/videos of some kind. I also am very ignorant when it comes to home school curriculum, laws, etc but I do want them to receive a diploma that is accredited of some type and that would be recorded year by year.
    Thanks for your feedback, thoughts, anything!

  2. Ratings Request Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    This may seem very off course from what you are saying, but...have you had her eyes checked by a developmental optometrist? Almost everything you are describing can be due to her eyes not focusing together on the same thing consistently. Get this checked out before putting her in school, right now if you can before you move.

    My son had these issues too. Vision therapy helped immensely. He did not see social cues because unless he focused really hard, he would see two of people. Which makes it hard to tell what the expressions are. Large crowds could also be a problem for the same reason. Focusing on school work was really hard too...it took a lot of effort for him to see one of the line, he had to take breaks and rest his eyes....he didn't realize what he was doing but in hindsight, I can see that is what was happening.

    But...the good news is, vision therapy helped. He had to practice EVERY day, for about 20 minutes to a half hour. After he strengthened the eye muscles he could read for longer times, do work more quickly. And he is picking up on social cues from people as well as animals. (No more getting bit, pecked or scratched because he didn't notice the ears back or fur up.) Words don't float around on the page. All of this stuff he thought was normal until after he did therapy.

    And yeah, K12 is intensive. But...3rd grade only took about 2 - 3 hours a day for my daughter. One thing that we did was to NOT do every page suggested. Sometimes we discussed instead of writing the answers. There is a lot of work there for kids who need extra to "get it" but if your child gets it, do like the school teacher and give less. If you are already giving less...get the vision checked. Reading the math problem 6 times...that very well could be a vision issue.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Arrived ejsmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Welcome!

    I absolutely second the vision therapy recommendation. Same thing with my son. SO much changed after vision therapy. Especially when you have a kid who is a visual learner (mine is too, in fact he probably has auditory processing issues, and that's next on the list to be checked out.)

    Another thing you may want to eliminate is working memory issues. I had no idea about this but DS was horribly deficient in his working memory ability and dealing with that was the final piece to help him make huge leaps forward in learning to handle independent work. We did have to pay for a private educational psychologist to do an eval, but it was totally worth it to help DS realize his potential.

    If it were me, knowing what I now know about these challenges, I would absolutely not want to throw a kid into PS, let alone a new PS, with these types of issues being unaddressed. That would be setting a child up to fail and not understanding why they can't do what everyone else seems to do with ease. I suspect it's not a choice she's making, not a behavior - but that she can't help it. If she is struggling in group settings now, what makes you think PS will help that?

    We did some of K12 (independently purchased) for a few early years. It can be a lot, but if you have a quick learner who is curious they soak it up. Of course you don't have to do everything they suggest to learn the lesson - they offer numerous activities for the lesson to provide methods for various types of learners. Do one (or two if needed) and then move on. K12 is often repetitive, too, IMHO. We skipped things that were overkill. The first thing we dropped was their math - DS hated it. He did it for K through an online PS, and when we went to homeschooling we moved on for math. We also dropped their Language Arts pretty quickly as that is an area DS is working many grades above level. He did enjoy the history, art, music, and science, but we used those as a spine, and added so much more, as DS loves to go deeper. I will share with you that all the cool online demonstrations, virtual learning, interactive parts that DS enjoyed about K12 disappeared as we got into the older elementary grades and it was reading online then multiple choice questions. Read online and spit it back out. Dry and boring. It wasn't teaching him to THINK anymore. We switched to Oak Meadow for the past 2 years (independent.) as a spine for history and science only. It is much more ... thinking and doing. DS finds it OK, but wants something different for next year. I'm piecing things together from various sources.

    One thing you can do if you like K12 is use their scope and sequence as a guide and find other materials online, at the library, amazon, Rainbow Resources (they sell religious materials, too, so you have to sort through.)

    Also, which state are you moving to? Maybe someone here can help you find resources in your new home area.
    homeschooling one DS, age 13.

  5. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ejsmom View Post
    Welcome!

    I absolutely second the vision therapy recommendation. Same thing with my son. SO much changed after vision therapy. Especially when you have a kid who is a visual learner (mine is too, in fact he probably has auditory processing issues, and that's next on the list to be checked out.)

    Another thing you may want to eliminate is working memory issues. I had no idea about this but DS was horribly deficient in his working memory ability and dealing with that was the final piece to help him make huge leaps forward in learning to handle independent work. We did have to pay for a private educational psychologist to do an eval, but it was totally worth it to help DS realize his potential.

    If it were me, knowing what I now know about these challenges, I would absolutely not want to throw a kid into PS, let alone a new PS, with these types of issues being unaddressed. That would be setting a child up to fail and not understanding why they can't do what everyone else seems to do with ease. I suspect it's not a choice she's making, not a behavior - but that she can't help it. If she is struggling in group settings now, what makes you think PS will help that?

    We did some of K12 (independently purchased) for a few early years. It can be a lot, but if you have a quick learner who is curious they soak it up. Of course you don't have to do everything they suggest to learn the lesson - they offer numerous activities for the lesson to provide methods for various types of learners. Do one (or two if needed) and then move on. K12 is often repetitive, too, IMHO. We skipped things that were overkill. The first thing we dropped was their math - DS hated it. He did it for K through an online PS, and when we went to homeschooling we moved on for math. We also dropped their Language Arts pretty quickly as that is an area DS is working many grades above level. He did enjoy the history, art, music, and science, but we used those as a spine, and added so much more, as DS loves to go deeper. I will share with you that all the cool online demonstrations, virtual learning, interactive parts that DS enjoyed about K12 disappeared as we got into the older elementary grades and it was reading online then multiple choice questions. Read online and spit it back out. Dry and boring. It wasn't teaching him to THINK anymore. We switched to Oak Meadow for the past 2 years (independent.) as a spine for history and science only. It is much more ... thinking and doing. DS finds it OK, but wants something different for next year. I'm piecing things together from various sources.

    One thing you can do if you like K12 is use their scope and sequence as a guide and find other materials online, at the library, amazon, Rainbow Resources (they sell religious materials, too, so you have to sort through.)

    Also, which state are you moving to? Maybe someone here can help you find resources in your new home area.
    Some very good suggestions and thoughts, thank you both very much!
    I understand what you mean about putting her in PS with group setting issues, I see that. However, when she is put in situations consistently in general, her tendency is to improve. For example with basketball..she wanted so badly to start. She had some issues initially and then wanted to quit. I suggested she really try to make it through half season and now she is in love with it. Now if I had said oh you're uncomfortable ok lets just quit, what would I have been enabling? When she did ballet, the same thing happened...she took my advice, went through half the course and was still unhappy and not clicking so we dropped that. Fine, no problem. If its not for you its not for you!
    My point is, just because something makes you uncomfortable does not mean you can decide to avoid it from there on out. Groups are going to be part of life for the rest of life. My 2 cents.
    Now if this turns out to be a medical/developmental issue like you and crazygooselady mentioned that is another story. We will definitely look into that and thank you for the wise suggestions!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Walk me through curriculum choices