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  1. #11

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    Not a thing wrong about being eclectic! And nothing wrong with getting something structured to start. We all need some hand-holding when we jump off into this world of homeschooling.

    Sometimes I simply think "eclectic homeschooling" simply means we're the ones who're best able to pull the best stuff from all over everywhere. So sure, buy some Timberdoodle educational toys, but gadfly about with BYL or sections of MBtP or Memoria Press even to make your year come together. Or just have an outline (which is kind of what BYL is, it's not and the MBtP people argue this all the time, a "curriculum" which tells you exactly what to do when and for how long blah) and fill it up with all your magpie finds of this, that and the other thing. Your daughter will thrive, and you'll best be able to switch things around if something's not working.
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  2. T4L In Forum Nov19
  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fastweedpuller View Post
    Not a thing wrong about being eclectic! And nothing wrong with getting something structured to start. We all need some hand-holding when we jump off into this world of homeschooling.

    Sometimes I simply think "eclectic homeschooling" simply means we're the ones who're best able to pull the best stuff from all over everywhere. So sure, buy some Timberdoodle educational toys, but gadfly about with BYL or sections of MBtP or Memoria Press even to make your year come together. Or just have an outline (which is kind of what BYL is, it's not and the MBtP people argue this all the time, a "curriculum" which tells you exactly what to do when and for how long blah) and fill it up with all your magpie finds of this, that and the other thing. Your daughter will thrive, and you'll best be able to switch things around if something's not working.
    I found the sample downloads for byl and I think it will work great for what I need (and much cheaper). They don't have a preK program, but I think I can still use the outline of the schedule for K and sub in whatever I want us to focus on.

    I think am outline for the year, a weekly checklist, and a big box where she can dig out what she wants to do today would be ideal for us. And since the stuff in the box would change week to week I think it would be a hit.


    Edit: and a chart for her to put a sticker on everytime she does something from the box would be icing on the cake.

  4. #13
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Great. Glad I could be of help!

    AM, no you don't have to buy all the books for K. There are some spines though, like the atlas and cookbook and craft book that she suggests buying because you use it throughout. The K year is 30 weeks separated by continent (which DS will love). The people on the BYL Facebook page seem to use it in different ways - speed it up, slow it down, skip or replace books and activities. It seems pretty flexible. We've discussed on here before about checklist vs. full curriculum guides. BYL is most def a checklist. It doesn't have a teachers guide on HOW to teach. Just an outline of what to teach with a suggested pace. I think it will work out well for us, and was basically what I was trying to cobble together. I think it's on sale this week. I'll have to check.

    Eta: Nerp. Looks like it was last month only.
    Last edited by TFZ; 05-11-2016 at 03:35 PM.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  5. #14

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    handsonmommy, "About the Christian curriculum-I'm lightly catholic (so most Christian curriculums seem to forgo evolution and preach creation and so forth. So I'm bot looking for Christian curriculum and secular usually ilfeels a better fit and I can trust it a bit more). But I don't mind the occasional exposure to God etc. I like the values religion teaches, so I don't completely avoid religion, but I want something based a little more scientifically sound than what most Christian curriculums teach (cuz I'm just lightly catholic. I believe in god, I try to be a good person, I don't mind reading a bible story in the mix, but I want it separate.) Does that make sense?"

    Parenting Beyond Belief: On Raising Ethical, Caring Kids Without Religion: Dale McGowan: 9780814474266: Amazon.com: Books

    Raising Freethinkers: A Practical Guide for Parenting Beyond Belief: Dale McGowan, Molleen Matsumura, Amanda Metskas, Jan Devor: 9780814410967: Amazon.com: Books

    Food for thought. We actually had the author of these books as a featured guest not that long ago here!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  6. #15
    Senior Member Enlightened
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    I'm Catholic (well, currently non practicing). It's how we ended up quickly realizing we wanted to homeschool secularly since we didn't like any of the religious curriculums and we really do want to teach evolution, world religions, etc.
    I'm doing BYL K with my 5yo. I use it as a guide. I don't have a useful library here, so I do have to buy the books. A couple of them I skipped buying (like the cookbook and art book since the internet has so much). BYL K is written as 5 days a week for 30 weeks. We are defiantly taking it slower than written since we go off on tangents as my son desires and we rarely do school 5 days in a week. I do add in extra hands on projects I find online and break up the readings differently. It's worked out great for us and it's very flexible. I am not someone who wants everything dictated to me - just need some help focusing. Sometimes CurrClick will have some of them on sale.

  7. #16
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    Oh, before I decided on BYL I did look into Timberdoodle since they have their secular kits now. It's not really a curriculum as much as they just gather stuff up into a bundle. It's more of a "do 3 pages of math a week" than an actual curriculum. Seems like most people who like it really just look to them for hands on ideas to supplement.
    I also looked into MBTP and it seemed like a lot of worksheets for my us. Their overview just didn't fit for my family, but I do know a lot of others do enjoy it a lot.

  8. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by alwayssmile View Post
    I'm Catholic (well, currently non practicing). It's how we ended up quickly realizing we wanted to homeschool secularly since we didn't like any of the religious curriculums and we really do want to teach evolution, world religions, etc.
    I'm doing BYL K with my 5yo. I use it as a guide. I don't have a useful library here, so I do have to buy the books. A couple of them I skipped buying (like the cookbook and art book since the internet has so much). BYL K is written as 5 days a week for 30 weeks. We are defiantly taking it slower than written since we go off on tangents as my son desires and we rarely do school 5 days in a week. I do add in extra hands on projects I find online and break up the readings differently. It's worked out great for us and it's very flexible. I am not someone who wants everything dictated to me - just need some help focusing. Sometimes CurrClick will have some of them on sale.

    You sound like me. I like going off according to interest, but I also need a little focus so I know I'm hitting the big topics lol. Except I'm not as good about searching for hands on projects. I love doing them, just not searching for one I want lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by alwayssmile View Post
    Oh, before I decided on BYL I did look into Timberdoodle since they have their secular kits now. It's not really a curriculum as much as they just gather stuff up into a bundle. It's more of a "do 3 pages of math a week" than an actual curriculum. Seems like most people who like it really just look to them for hands on ideas to supplement.
    I also looked into MBTP and it seemed like a lot of worksheets for my us. Their overview just didn't fit for my family, but I do know a lot of others do enjoy it a lot.
    See I don't like the "do 3 pages of math" concept. They had so much hands in in their kits and they said their curriculum had checklists, so I was thinking it would be:

    Do xyz activity with the tracing do-hickey they have
    Play 3 little pigs game
    Get abc equipment from science kit and do this experiment
    (And since it isn't book heavy maybe just add in a storytime everyday)

    I saw the workbooks, but there is so much hands on stuff included I thought it would be much more hands on with the workbooks as supplements (more so than focusing on the workbooks and hands on as supplements).

    If it's flipped then it REALLY isn't what I was looking for


    Edit to add: mbtp I looked at and considered (and I only looked at their preK? K? Whichever has the letter of the weeks and holiday units) because it looked like it had some crafts-which is something dd is into right now. And the name of the curriculum makes it sound like it would be hands on.

    I'm pretty big on learning with fun and games-especially at this young age. I don't want something that feels like school (as in school I went through at public school), but at the same time I do want her to learn while we have fun (at least sometimes). I like crafts, and fun science experiments (like we played with magnets. She can take from it what she will) and finger painting (sensory, creativity) and field trips and dvds on in the background while she plays. I keep learning games available on her tablet and watch for things she may be struggling with (if there is a game that requires tracing and she is struggling, I download games that teach tracing). Kinda laid back, fun, not super stressed on WHAT she learns, as long as she learns. Love reading books to her.

    As she gets older though, I want just a pinch of focus to it, but lots of freedom that's our style over here though
    Last edited by Handsonmommy; 05-12-2016 at 08:24 AM.

  9. #18

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    You can browse the web for plenty of *letter of the week* plans... and its free! After you look at a couple of the sites, you will see that there are only so many ways to present the letters.

    You can also search for crafts the same way. When my oldest was PreK, I picked up a *Year of Crafts* book at Michaels or Target.

    There is a lot of *free* out there to be had.

    And it was offensive to imply that religion is needed to have morals. (Offensive and untrue.) Just sayin... that is how it comes across. Coming to a secular site and saying that is a bit impolite.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  10. #19
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    I didn't do BYL K (we have done 2 and 3), but it sounds like that makes a good fit with what you already do. You can slow it down, add extra activities if you want and string it out for a couple of years. I often find extra activities or books pop up, and it's lovely if you have the time to do them.

    We did some MBtP (5-7 and 6-8, so I don't know what their younger one is like) but I did find it a lot of worksheets, although there were some 'make things' projects in there. I really wanted lit based and BYL has so many more books, at least at the ages we did.

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  11. #20
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Moving beyond the page vs timberdoodle
    I got sucked down an endless hole of searching on the Internet for many months. It was fine for my first one, but with three kids all roughly two years apart, I won't have the time to waste with the next two.

    Here are the resources I narrowed it down to for prek. They will cover everything we want outside the library walls. I am done searching and pinning and bookmarking a million sites. Here are the results:

    Letter of the week: The Ultimate Letter Of The Week Resource For Preschool - No Time For Flash Cards

    Preschool weekly units (including color of the week): Celebrate the Color Blue Theme and Activities

    Shape of the week: Chalk Talk: A Kindergarten Blog: shapes

    Work shelf ideas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=102J4wQyXNA&app=desktop

    Rhymes: Preschool Fingerplays, Action Poems, Nursery Rhymes and Songs

    Songs and finger plays: http://www.district196.org/ec/parent...s/songbook.pdf

    A thread discussing how to homeschool preschool that I found very helpful: https://www.secularhomeschool.com/fro...eschooler.html
    Last edited by TFZ; 05-12-2016 at 11:53 AM.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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