Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Chemistry

  1. #11
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    1,107

    Default

    We've been watching the Periodic Table of Videos and enjoying watching them set fire to everything (DH is a chemist, so not much of a surprise, but entertaining). DS has enjoyed the Bashar Chemistry book, too

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  2. T4L In Forum Dec19
  3. #12

    Default

    I had found a site with periodic table videos that I had forgotten about. We had seen a U tube on YouTube. I think that's what got my 8 (almost 9) year old son interested in chemistry to begin with. He doesn't even realize he is so interested in math in science. I am still checking out all the helpful suggestions and I think I even stumbled upon a few more.

    http://www.chem4kids.com (this was listed in the RSO sample pages)
    http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/chemistry.html
    and lots of books that for some reason I couldn't find before

    RSO doesn't look like something he would enjoy if he saw the book. Although, it looks like something I could use.

    Elemental Science is something I have seen before but I didn't notice the chemistry in it last time I looked at it. I keep going back to it though.

    The American Chemical Society looks promising too.

    I checked out Ptable.com and it looked like it links out to Wikipedia. I know some people think Wikipedia has become much more reliable since it was first started but I am still cautious to use that site for more that brainstorming and generating ideas.

    I definitely plan to buy a molymod kit as soon as I can.

    Thank you again for all of the helpful suggestions!

  4. #13
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    1,107

    Default

    At this age with RSO, you give them the notebook pages and lab pages and the rest is for you, don't know if that makes a difference

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  5. #14

    Default

    Your husband is a chemist? I don't suppose he's a chemist that might, occasionally, answer a question from an almost-7-yr old chemistry fanatic that has surpassed his own parents (and google's) skills?

  6. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SLP View Post
    I checked out Ptable.com and it looked like it links out to Wikipedia. I know some people think Wikipedia has become much more reliable since it was first started but I am still cautious to use that site for more that brainstorming and generating ideas.
    I think with Wikipedia, it very much depends on what sort of topic you're getting into. If you're dealing with something controversial, or cultural, or political, that's one thing. But if you are looking up the melting point of an element or the pKa of an acid, or clicking on the list of azo dyes, I really think you have nothing to worry about. You can use ChemSpider to look up compounds instead (it has more of them, but less info on them). My son does sometimes. Either way, it's really handy to have some way to check if that thing you built with the molymods is real and what it is, if so, and Ptable is the best I've seen for that (under the "compounds" mode)

  7. #16
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    1,107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mckittre View Post
    Your husband is a chemist? I don't suppose he's a chemist that might, occasionally, answer a question from an almost-7-yr old chemistry fanatic that has surpassed his own parents (and google's) skills?
    I don't mind asking. He doesn't actually do much chemistry these days, more in management

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  8. #17

    Default

    There's also the ACS's free programs. Inquiry in Action is for elementary school. It's free. The ACS's education philosophy is to let experiments lead.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  9. #18

    Default

    Oh, and while more of them are about physics, there are also a bunch of the old Eureka! videos free on Youtube that cover chemistry topics.
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  10. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ellycp View Post
    At this age with RSO, you give them the notebook pages and lab pages and the rest is for you, don't know if that makes a difference

    Elly
    That might make a difference. I'll take a look at it again. Thanks!

  11. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mckittre View Post
    I think with Wikipedia, it very much depends on what sort of topic you're getting into. If you're dealing with something controversial, or cultural, or political, that's one thing. But if you are looking up the melting point of an element or the pKa of an acid, or clicking on the list of azo dyes, I really think you have nothing to worry about. You can use ChemSpider to look up compounds instead (it has more of them, but less info on them). My son does sometimes. Either way, it's really handy to have some way to check if that thing you built with the molymods is real and what it is, if so, and Ptable is the best I've seen for that (under the "compounds" mode)
    That is good to know. I did like the interactive periodic table. Thank you!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Chemistry