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  1. #1

    Default Need Help with finding good language arts curriculum

    So, we are in the second year of homeschool. My daughter is 10 and would be in the 5th grade. She is pretty advanced in reading and writing--or so the public schools she attended have said--being a teacher myself and a pretty hard critic, I think she is average or maybe a bit above. Anyhow, we are doing grammarlogues and I am also doing some of ellen mchenry's basement workshop english study. I have looked at Moving Beyond the Page literature study units--I think we would pick and choose from the 10-12 concept. I have also been looking at Learning through Literature the tan book. Does anyone have any experience with either of these or have any other recommendations for language arts? I don't want anything religious based. She is already writing in a Journal and working on her own short stories on the computer but I feel like maybe she needs to do something literature based so I can easily see her comprehension and get her writing in different styles etc.. ahh..please help, I feel like I just keep researching and researching on the computer and can't get satisfied--am also thinking of doing the Great Editing Adventure series--any thoughts on any of this long rambling post would be greatly appreciated! Oh, and she reads a lot on her own already. And last but not least, we want to do spanish and are thinking of Rosetta Stone but it is so expensive at 600.00--does anyone have experience with it? Maybe we should just get the first level--but it's still expensive
    Last edited by Journey of Life mama; 08-25-2010 at 05:32 PM.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Arrived Teri's Avatar
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    We are doing the 10-12 MBTP level this year, but I have used it every year.
    The literature units are very comprehensive. They involve reading one book for every unit (12 for a full year's curriculum). It includes language arts (how to write a paragraph, multi-paragraph paper and a research paper, grammar, etc.)
    There are usually 2-3 chapters to read for each lesson, questions to answer, grammar lessons to complete and projects.
    Today was lesson two for People of Sparks. We read the first three chapters, did a grammar exercise to review pronouns (identified them in a paragraph and then sorted them on a chart by Subjective, Objective, Interrogatory, Demonstrative, etc.), then we had to predict five things that Lina would find about life above ground that were different than living in Ember.
    ETA: I forgot to say that they answered comprehension questions about the first three chapters.
    The 10-12 level is equivalent to 6th grade and definitely secular.
    Teri
    Joseph (5/00), Libby (10/01), Caroline (9/02) and Alex (4/89)
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    Senior Member Arrived dbmamaz's Avatar
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    i use micheal clay thompson's language arts, which i love, but you have to assign literature to read outside of the program. he uses literature for his language examples, but does not have reading assignments. He has a book called Classics in the Classroom, which has some ideas, tho.
    Cara, homeschooling one
    Raven, ds 10, all around intense kid
    Orion, floundering recent graduate
    22 yo dd, not at home
    Inactive blog at longsummer

  5. #4

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    I am doing MBtP with my 10 year old - but I haven't used it before so I can't give you a review. My daughter is an advanced reader and an excellent writer. I'm planning to use MBtP but having a list of additional reading for her to work through as she usually reads a book or more a week in addition to school work (she's currently reading 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea). Teri was very helpful to me when I was deciding about programs this year (thank you Teri!). I've received our materials and I'm liking what I see - and my daughter is completely excited to begin the year. She's read some of the books but I explained that we'd be going into greater depth with them and she isn't worried about re-reading some.

    We are doing Spanish as well - decided to go with Auralog's Tell Me More vs. Rosetta Stone. But again, it's brand-new for us so I can't give a review. I just set up the program last night and so far it looks good, but that's before my children have actually used it. lol.

  6. #5

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    Wow, thanks everyone. I am so excited to get so many responses. I think we will try one individual unit in MBTP to see how we like it and I will definitely look into Michael Clay Thompson as well. I have not heard of Auralog but will research it later on today. Willow took off a bit from reading in the summer but she still averages a book a week or so. I just wish there were some comprehension questions out there somewhere for the books she reads that we could just download MBTP looks promising though--I think we will try the People of Sparks and put the Albert Einstein package of the list too--she is very interested in him

  7. #6

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    You know, I've had good luck finding some questions guides on CurrClick and then sites where teachers post their lesson plans. I think out of the 40 books we did last year, I found stuff for at least 1/3, maybe more... It's worth looking into. The CurrClick guides were so inexpensive (a couple of dollars) it was worth it even though we didn't use them in their entirety. And then on the teacher sites, I found so many cool ideas for out--of-the box "book reports" - for example, a 3-d cube that had different information on each side and then an illustration on the inside; a paper bag oral presentation; etc. My DD got a kick out of that stuff and always asks to do more projects like that.

    Hope that helps!

  8. #7

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    I really liked MBTP but wasn't sure my 5th grader would like it since he really loves picking and choosing his books to read. We did many lit studies from Currclick last year to go along with whatever book we was reding that week. This year one of teacher friends recommended what she uses in her classroom. Its "Independant Reading Management Kit:Genre" from Scholastic. Its a reproducible book that has 9 different projects/activities for different genres of reading. Historical fictiom, mystery, adventure, Fairy tales, Fantasy, realistic Fiction, Biography, Science Fiction, and nonfiction. Its working for us - although we are only two books in so far this year Its set up for the teacher to have a reading station with the reproducibles ready to go and the student picks three activities for each book s/he reads instead a traditional book report. It's normally around $15-I picked a copy up on Ebay. Its recommended for grades 4-8 so I think its a great resource for a few years.
    Jeannette
    Mom to 11 yr old Lego Maniac son and 5 yr old Self proclaimed Future Rock Star Daughter
    Gearing up for our third year of homeschool

  9. #8

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    I was just looking at Sandi Queen's Language Lesson Series (CM inspired), it sounds great, so far, but I can't find out the religious content
    Brandi
    Alabama Gulf Coaster,
    Learning and loving life with DS 6 and hubby of 21 years

    DS is in public school, but we enrich and expand at home

  10. #9

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    thanks everyone--gonna look into currclick and would like any feedback on michael clay thompson if you know much about it--do you only need the teacher manual and practice book?

  11. #10
    Senior Member Arrived dbmamaz's Avatar
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    MCT teachers manuals contain the entire student book so yes, you can share them with your kids, aside from the practice books. Its a very different approach, but thats usually what i like
    Cara, homeschooling one
    Raven, ds 10, all around intense kid
    Orion, floundering recent graduate
    22 yo dd, not at home
    Inactive blog at longsummer

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Need Help with finding good language arts curriculum