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  1. #1

    Default Using Youtube as your science teacher/inspiration for you and your children.

    Using Youtube as your science teacher/inspiration for you and your children.
    Teaching science is one of the hardest subjects for most homeschoolers for many reasons, one of which is that the parent feels inadequately prepared to teach science because it was so hard and/or boring when they took science in school. This is exactly why I hate teaching English/grammar/Literature and unfortunately my hatred for writing has rubbed off on my oldest. But you are not too old to learn science along with your children, and with the resources available on the internet, particularly youtube, it can be very entertaining. When people ask me if I feel like I’m wasting my degree in physics staying at home with the kids, I say NO! I’m still learning, in my first year of homeschooling alone, I learned more history than I ever learned in school. I’ve also learned Japanese, some basic piano (before my child shot past me on the learning curve), and a whole lot of science which I did not know 10 years ago.

    Even though I have a degree in physics, that does not mean I’m equally comfortable teaching biology, earth science or chemistry. So last year when I taught high school biology using a college textbook, I was basically one week ahead of the kids. I had never had biology in college and my high school biology class??? I guess I had one but I have absolutely no memories of it. So I was learning as I went and youtube was my hero. The text we used was really good and I understood most of what I read, but it was nice to go to Youtube and watch Hank Green, the Amoeba sisters or Khan Academy explain the concepts as well, not to mention its more fun to watch Crash Course than to read a textbook. Youtube is also a gold mine when looking for labs, especially labs you can’t or don’t want to do in your kitchen. We actually did quite a bit of dissecting in our biology class and I would watch videos on youtube as a preview so I would know what we were looking at in class. These videos are also great for the kids who just don’t want to dissect as they can watch somebody else do it without all the mess.

    The Royal Institution (RI) has some amazing videos, especially their Christmas lectures which I guess are special lectures for the public they do around the holidays that are just jammed pack with amazing demos. I was just going to show the first 30 minutes of RI’s Chemical Curiosities to my chemistry class and they begged to watch the whole show, so we did. The Science of Fireworks! is another fantastic one for getting kids interested in chemistry.

    One of my go-to favorites for chemistry is Tyler DeWitt, I really like the way he explains things, I’m thinking I may just use his videos for the lecture portion of my high school chem class this fall. Let the students watch the video lectures at home and do the labs in class. Doc Schuster does great physics lectures and he’s very entertaining as well. Physics Girl doesn’t have a complete class of lectures but its worth watching the ones she has made. Mr. Anderson’s videos at Bozeman science are useful as well and I think his videos have gotten better but sometimes his voice puts me to sleep. Arvin Gupta has series of videos called Toys from Trash and most of those ‘toys’ are actually science demos that you can make with stuff around the house, straws, soda bottles and plastic cups - useful when you’re doing science on a budget.



    So what are your go-to channels on youtube? Which subject do you dread teaching and how do you cope? What’s your favorite subject that you’ve learned since homeschooling?

    Last edited by Topsy; 05-17-2016 at 07:36 AM.
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

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    I don't mind teaching most anything - but in the science dept I'm much more comfortable with earth science and biology/ecology than physical science. And I am not a crafty/maker/builder type. But I can see that doing science activities and lab-type experiments is the best way to help DS learn. And of course I've got a kid who has gotten fascinated by all things invention/electricity/physics related! Murphy's law, right?

    My kiddo is almost 9 and we are unschool-ish. I am using Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding to help me chart a course through physical science - energy, force, movement, sound, light, electricity, are in the plans. He's up for most any interesting activity involving 'being a scientist.' And apparently I need to learn about dark matter and black holes, too. Not sure if that's a genuine interest or due to Star Wars and various YouTube videos, but he wants to investigate.

    So I'll be checking out the physics resources you mention here! Do you have any other favorite sources or ideas for physics that involves building/experimenting and have really good instructions for teacher/parents? And what kind of supplies (preferably cheap/re-usable) would be good to have on hand?

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdpele View Post
    And apparently I need to learn about dark matter and black holes, too. Not sure if that's a genuine interest or due to Star Wars and various YouTube videos, but he wants to investigate.
    A really good book for relativity, dark matter and black holes is the Horribly Famous (Dead Famous) Einstein and his Inflatable Universe book. Relativity has always been the one physics subject that I skip over but my son loves it and he told me to read this book and it does a great job explaining it, so even I understood.

    If he likes legos there are some nice lego education sets for building that would be very hands off for you. If you click on this site, https://education.lego.com/en-us/mid...nd-engineering and scroll down to the Simple & Powered Machines. This is a great curriculum for hands on gears, levels, etc. You can get a preview of the curriculum on the page above. My kids thought they were just playing with legos and didn't realize it was 'school'. The set is expensive, $165 but it comes with a motor and a nice selection of technic bricks so he can build his own stuff, not just whats in the curriculum. Here's a direct link to the page. https://education.lego.com/en-us/pro...-base-set/9686

    There are some books called "Teaching Physics with Toys", Teaching Chemistry with Toys, etc. Amazon.com: Teaching Physics with Toys: Activities for Grades K-9 (9780070647213): Beverley Taylor, James Poth, Dwight Portman: Books
    I used these when my kids were younger to come up with activities.

    I haven't used RSO Physics but I enjoyed their earth and life science curriculum. They're pretty easy to put together and straight forward to implement, usually with just a page or two for the kids to read and then an activity/lab.
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

  5. #4

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    English, Latin and Music are my worst subjects. I'm totally incompetent in music and so of course that's my 13 year old's specialty. He wants to compose music for movies and tv shows. Luckily his piano and cello teachers are willing to help with that. Latin I know nothing so I just sit and watch the videos with him and trying to learn along with him. English I just can't stand so all we do is read books. We did spelling briefly in elementary but they read so much they have no trouble with spelling so we quit wasting time on that. Did just enough grammar so they can ace their standardized tests - though I supposed we're getting lots of grammar with foreign language (Japanese and Latin).
    Anybody have suggestions Great Course that involve music? Thinking about doing the subscription service.
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

  6. #5

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    Im wondering if you have sources of other great free streaming videos?

    For history I scour the PBS site and Amazon Prime before hitting youtube.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  7. #6

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    Anybody have suggestions Great Course that involve music? Thinking about doing the subscription service.
    It's not a Great Course source, but my son liked Professor Carol's music course: Discovering Music. She was a previous poster on Soup to Nuts a few weeks ago. It's a combo of music, culture, history, and art. We used it as a history credit, but it could be used for a music credit instead. You can get it hard copy or online.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    Im wondering if you have sources of other great free streaming videos?

    For history I scour the PBS site and Amazon Prime before hitting youtube.
    I usually hit youtube first and if I find something that's a clip from BBC, NOVA, or something like that, I'l head to netflix/Amazon to see if I can stream in higher quality. I looked at Curioristy stream, had the free subscription for a month or so but didn't watch anything, kind of disappointed by the look of the shows - too much fluff, but I didn't really give it a fair try. I'm usually looking for something short and to the point to show in class before a lab or to help with a particularly difficult concept.

    The thing I like about youtube is that my kids go to it automatically and have subscribed to things like SciShow and Veritasium on their own.
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

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    I'm a big fan of song-based learning (huge auditory learner here!!) so we've used science songs our whole homeschool career. They just stick with you for some reason. On YouTube, Science4Us has some great ones: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...hwk4xzR-QfqGjs And then Learning Games for Kids has quite a few that we've used so much they will still get stuck in my head to this day! Science Songs - Learning Science with songs | Learning Games For Kids


  10. #9

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    Using Youtube as your science teacher/inspiration for you and your children.
    Quote Originally Posted by Topsy View Post
    I'm a big fan of song-based learning (huge auditory learner here!!) so we've used science songs our whole homeschool career. They just stick with you for some reason. On YouTube, Science4Us has some great ones: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...hwk4xzR-QfqGjs And then Learning Games for Kids has quite a few that we've used so much they will still get stuck in my head to this day! Science Songs - Learning Science with songs | Learning Games For Kids
    YES!! I hadn't seen Science4Us before, we absolutely LOVE the horrible history music videos. We were so bummed when BBC started pulling them off youtube. You can still find some here and there. There is a teacher in San Jose, Science with Tom, who has his kids make Rap Battle songs with history/science figures and I show those in class a lot. Here's one about plate tectonics. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC1E...bwk5bCdJby68zw. Whoa, I just looked at his channel and he's stepped it up a bit and done a lot more videos.
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

  11. #10

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    Another song based channel is Smart Songs - they have songs about governent, voting, politics, geography, etc.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS1...OzG5wQEFpcNHOw
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

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Using Youtube as your science teacher/inspiration for you and your children.