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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
    There were no days that felt "off" because I was always either doing homeschool-work, house-work, or paid-work. Since I started working part-time outside of the home, I really feel like I can goof off in the house now, which I never used to do.
    I understand this all too well. I realized early on that because I was working from home, I had to dictate my free time just as much as I had to dictate my work time. I have DAYS when I do NOTHING! Sunday is my "leave me alone" day! My husband is off and generally ignore everyone so that I can recharge. He handles my daughter, housework, cooking, etc. It's my relax day. The rest of the week I ensure that I work no more than 6 hours a day (in two hour blocks). It's so important to remember the we control the amount of time that we allow "doing things" to take over our lives. Setting boundaries is a necessity.
    Kristina Brooke Classical Eclectic Homeschooling mom to The Tornado (11 yrs old). Blog: For Love of Education

  2. T4L In Forum Nov19
  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MissLemon View Post
    I run a small ebay business, in addition to homeschooling, and taking care of the house and animals. I realized a few weeks ago that "5 a day" was my magic number for how much work to do. I can't list more than 5 items a day in my store AND get everything else done, (cleaning new inventory that I buy at estate sales, packing and shipping items that have sold). I was trying to keep a pace of 10 items a day, and it's too much. It may seem like an easy thing, but ebay selling can be a huge time sink. But it's great, because I can work after the kiddo is in bed, so I always feel mentally "there" with him, (not thinking about work). Plus, I have started to have him help me with little things for the business, like bringing packages into the post office and helping to put labels on boxes.
    Setting a limit on what we focus on is so helpful! Thanks so much for sharing your experience.
    Kristina Brooke Classical Eclectic Homeschooling mom to The Tornado (11 yrs old). Blog: For Love of Education

  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norm Deplume View Post
    I've been working from home for 13 years. Homeschooling for 3 (started when younger child was in 3rd grade). I still have not found the secret to "keeping my sanity." I suppose my ADD doesn't help things-- it seems that I am allergic to routines and schedules.
    Thanks for commenting Robin. I too have ADD and it takes a lot to get my crap together. I have been using the tips here: Get Organized with Adult ADD | ADDitude - Attention Deficit Information & Resources.

    Routines are hard but I find them much easier to stick to now that I have simplified.
    Kristina Brooke Classical Eclectic Homeschooling mom to The Tornado (11 yrs old). Blog: For Love of Education

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Topsy View Post
    Routines are definitely the single most important way I keep my sanity. Nature has unchanging cycles and rhythms, and I have learned over the years that I must have them too. If I've only gotten three hours sleep, but the alarm goes off, I still have to get up and go through my morning routine. If I hit off the alarm and try to catch a few more z's then the next thing I know I've drifted off to la-la land for two more hours and the whole day feels shot. My natural instinct is to just let things "come as they may" but it never, ever has worked out. Either the family gets shortchanged or the work gets shortchanged, or my personality gets shortchanged because I'm trying madly to play "catch-up." Instead, if I stick to a routine - - even when it feels unnatural - - I somehow manage to get a lot more time for the people and things I love. It's been a constant battle, but one I can honestly say that I'm mostly winning and in the process I'm feeling a little more in tune with the world's natural rhythms.
    Yes! Routine feels unnatural to me too at times. I want to just go with the flow. But if I am honest with myself then I must admit that I am less productive when I move from my routine. In fact, I am quite ineffective! Thanks so much for sharing your experience.
    Kristina Brooke Classical Eclectic Homeschooling mom to The Tornado (11 yrs old). Blog: For Love of Education

  6. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by kristinabrooke View Post
    Routines are hard but I find them much easier to stick to now that I have simplified.
    My current struggle is that my old simpler routines have become obsolete, as my child has gotten older and my job has morphed into something different from when I started. But I haven't yet figured out how to re-simplify my days. It's like I need a vacation when all I do is get re-organized, but it never seems to happen. I post not for sympathy so much as for commiseration with others who are struggling.
    Robin,
    working-at-home mother of two.
    homeschooling the 11yo boy.
    the girl is 14 (8th grade) and loves her public school.
    they are very very different kids.

  7. #16
    Junior Member Newbie rnetwill's Avatar
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    May 2016
    Location
    NC
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    I have been working from home for the last 10 years with no success. Most of all the training i received ended up being very frustrating and not worth it. I have now decided to home school as i can no longer watch my child struggle with the end of grade tests. Do you know of any work from home jobs that are hiring that actually train you before pushing you out on the phones.(thats what type of work i've done-) or i would be interested in any Virtual Assistant jobs. Or any you know of? Thanks.
    Nanette Williams

  8. #17

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    I worked from home since before we started homeschooling. I've tutored since my younger was 2 years old (he's now 18!!). While we were homeschooling and they were young, we HAD to have some sort of routine at least in terms of their schoolwork requiring my help had to be done before 3 pm (when I started my "work day"). It also put a damper on field trips and outings that would occur in the afternoons and evenings. At the time, I put together our curricula; I had to plan the entire week on Sundays since I didn't have that much time during the weekdays. Routine was definitely my friend. The tutoring definitely helped during the times my husband was between jobs, keeping us from dipping into savings too much.

    However, as they got older, my time and tasks became more free and more fluid. The kids did most of their work on their own, freeing me up to continue tutoring and tackle necessary house projects that built up along the way. Sometimes simple passage of time makes things better.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  9. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by rnetwill View Post
    I.Do you know of any work from home jobs that are hiring that actually train you before pushing you out on the phones.(thats what type of work i've done-) or i would be interested in any Virtual Assistant jobs. Or any you know of? Thanks.
    Unfortunately, if you are doing customer service jobs, then that is par for the course. Unless you sign up with an Arise partner or something. The down side is that you have to pay for Arise Training and that training is often 6-8 weeks long.

    You may have better luck with NexRep (although when I worked for them answering calls for GrubHub, training was only a week long). I worked for Uber and Training was a week but we were answering email tickets. I did not have a good experience with Uber as a company though and that's all I can say about that.

    Here are some places you can find other work from home jobs, but if you don't want to feel like you are being thrown to the wolves, customer service may not be the best choice. Try for jobs in a more specialized field: teaching/tutoring, transcription, social media, writing, marketing, sales, etc.

    VIP KID
    A friend teachers through them. I interviewed but I decided against it because of the time difference. Please use this link to apply as she gets a referral bonus and she is the one who told me about it. VIPKID Teacher's Recruitment

    Places to search for Jobs
    FlexJobs:
    I highly recommend this. It is a pay site. do what I did and sign up for the month and apply for everything you can find. I applied for almost 180 positions. This is not an exaggeration although I am sure I applied to some twice. It's how I found my current job and it has been a HUGE blessing. https://www.flexjobs.com/
    Work At Home Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com
    Remote Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com



    Others
    Work at Home Mom Revolution - Work at Home Jobs for Moms
    http://realwaystoearnmoneyonline.com/

    HTH!
    Kristina Brooke Classical Eclectic Homeschooling mom to The Tornado (11 yrs old). Blog: For Love of Education

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    I've tutored since my younger was 2 years old (he's now 18!!). While we were homeschooling and they were young, we HAD to have some sort of routine at least in terms of their schoolwork requiring my help had to be done before 3 pm (when I started my "work day"). It also put a damper on field trips and outings that would occur in the afternoons and evenings. At the time, I put together our curricula; I had to plan the entire week on Sundays since I didn't have that much time during the weekdays. Routine was definitely my friend. The tutoring definitely helped during the times my husband was between jobs, keeping us from dipping into savings too much.
    Thanks for the insight. It's nice to see that others have made it work for them too.
    Kristina Brooke Classical Eclectic Homeschooling mom to The Tornado (11 yrs old). Blog: For Love of Education

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