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  1. #31

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    How do you introduce the issues and the history? How would it get incorporated into homeschooling? I cant really imagine it being meaningful to say *By the way, so-and-so that we just learned about is gay*. It seems like that would just foster a *those people are different, and it matters what your orientation is* attitude.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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  3. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    How do you introduce the issues and the history? How would it get incorporated into homeschooling? I cant really imagine it being meaningful to say *By the way, so-and-so that we just learned about is gay*. It seems like that would just foster a *those people are different, and it matters what your orientation is* attitude.
    To me I think it's just another interesting fact. If you don't say this person you just learned about is gay, do you just assume they were straight? It's like saying, this person we just learned about was left handed, it's an interesting fact that tells us a bit more about the person and goes against our natural inclination to think of that person as right handed. Or it's like saying, we suspect this person in history had autism. None of it really matters except to show that there are people in history that share things in common with people now. It may not be a direct relation to us personally or to our kids personally, but it's showing representation of these people in history. If all the great people of history, are cis gendered straight white men then that does more to make everyone not fitting in that small back seem very different and other. People are different, but that's a good thing. We all deserve to be treated equally but we also all deserve to celebrate our differences.
    Teemie - 11 years old, 6th grade with an ecclectic mix

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  4. #33
    Senior Member Enlightened Soulhammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miri Morgenstern View Post
    Would you consider beta testing some of our materials? We would love to get some feedback on a few stories and games we've developed for younger children. We also have materials we would like to beta test for 7th-12th grade.
    Would love to!

  5. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    How do you introduce the issues and the history? How would it get incorporated into homeschooling? I cant really imagine it being meaningful to say *By the way, so-and-so that we just learned about is gay*. It seems like that would just foster a *those people are different, and it matters what your orientation is* attitude.
    I understand your concern. Teaching LGBTQ history/content isn't about outing a historical figure. The term homosexuality wasn't even around before the late 19th century. Understanding of sexuality is dependent on time and culture. Instead it is about teaching that LGBTQ people have a history. Also, HUE believes that it is important for students to see reflections of LGBTQ people gender non-conforming people in history. For example, we have a QUE (Queer Unit of Ed Study) on Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, who was born during the Civil War period and became a Civil War soldier. Was she what we would today call transgender or was she gender non-conforming? My personal view (people disagree, to be clear)is that it doesn't matter. The QUE presents what we do know and allows the child the chance to explore the history and interpretation through discussion. One trans young man told me that he wished there had been something like that when he was in school because he certainly thought he was completely alone. I have much more to say! But I think this is long enough.

    History UnErased's board member and historian Warren Blumenfeld has produced a series of slides that offer a very complete and easily digestible history.

  6. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    How do you introduce the issues and the history? How would it get incorporated into homeschooling? I cant really imagine it being meaningful to say *By the way, so-and-so that we just learned about is gay*. It seems like that would just foster a *those people are different, and it matters what your orientation is* attitude.
    Sorry, I tried to reply to this earlier, but I included a link and I guess it was a broken one, so my response never went through. Let's see if I can remember what I wrote! Oh, I know! I gave you a link to a history slide show from our friend Warren Blumenfeld, a UMASS professor - you can search for his name and a 'history of homosexuality' and you should find useful presentations.

    But that isn't my reply to your question - LGBTQ history isn't about a mention, instead it is about the history of activism and/or how a person's identity informs their work. Quick example: we have HUEstory which focuses on the life of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman who became a soldier in the Civil War. We tell her story in a way that is accessible for younger children and then ask the children to grapple with the bigger questions. There is no answer; Sarah assumed the name Lyons and died and was buried with that name. Was Lyons transgender or a young woman seeking freedom from gender restrictions...or was joining the military a purely economic decision? What other intersections can we make to events in the past and what connections to the present can we find. What secrets do people have and why do they have them? This particular HUEstory has an illustrated story, map activities, vocab activities and a game that goes with it (please consider beta-testing it for us!).

    We're working on another HUEstory that is about Warren (mentioned above) - his personal story is so interesting and intersects with historical events when he became an activist as an adult.

    It is always fun to mention a personal tidbit about an historical figure, but LGBTQ history is so much more than that - it is about the development of personal, community and national identity.

  7. #36

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    Alexsmom, as much as we hate to say it, ppl who are gay WILL have different life experiences MERELY because they are gay. The lucky few won't. But, in this country, most will. So, I don't think it's odd to say they are gay, anymore than pointing out they are female, jewish, white, tall, have curly hair, are blind, or anything. While it may not define them, as one thing doesn't define ppl, it will help shape them. They may face further discrimination for it. So, it might be nice to point out, "hey look, they are different than us, but THAT'S OK!"

  8. #37

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    Thanks, it totally makes sense to spotlight one of the over 400 (?) known women who fought in the civil war as men. There was an article I read about them, highlighted a variety of examples of women who joined up with their husbands, women who stayed on as men the rest of their lives, women who went back to gender-norm women roles, women who got outed, women who somehow made it through surgeries without being outed (how could that even happen! did the doctors and convalescent nurses conveniently not notice?).
    Me reading and enjoying an article doesnt mean the article would be so interesting to my boy though.

    We are approaching Civil War studies, then would we just annex on LGBTQ to that? Spend a day or two adding more color to personalities of the civil war?

    I really wasnt trying to be difficult about this, but the way I learn is by having it all laid out in front of me.

    If theres a link to civil war women suitable for my 10yo, Id appreciate it.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #38

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    @Aservarial,
    Last year, or a couple years ago, Tanaqui schooled me on my obliviousness to racism for young kids... I keep her post with me, its a reminder and I sometimes think *athiest* instead of black, to help me relate... I can just as easily put LGBTQ there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tanaqui View Post
    I'm just speculating here, I don't know what the majority of black people say to their kids, but it seems that the most obvious thing to say to a three year old is variations on "You behave, you don't want them to say black children don't know how to act". These are words the majority is never going to have to say.

    You might also have to say things like 'They called you a ****, because of your skin color. That's because they're not nice". Those things come up! I once had a woman on a bus call my kid a mulatto, right to my face. Uh, no.

    Oh, here's another one. "When people want to touch your hair, you tell them no. Your hair is beautiful, and they don't have a right to pet you like a dog, just because you're black." You would be surprised how often *that* comes up. Variation: "No, you're hair is just as beautiful as Elsa's/Cinderella's/Belle's/Ariel's. That woman was wrong to call it dirty/greasy/messy. She didn't say it because it's true, she said it because you don't look like her and she felt like being mean."

    Man, now that I think back on the preschool years, I can spin these out all day.

    "That flag on the car means you don't really want to talk to him. He probably doesn't like black people too much, and he might say something mean without thinking."

    "Look, most of the people on this TV show are white. That's not very realistic, is it?" (Once you start noticing it, it's hard to break the habit of counting up the minorities and being disappointed.)
    https://www.secularhomeschool.com/hom...t-graders.html
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  10. #39

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    It doesn't occur to me so often. I've had it reasonably easy. I'm the "easy" part of the LGBTQ equation (and no, I don't say that because it was at ALL easy at the time). I'm bi, but married a guy so totally pass as straight. I'm a white girl in the south. I'm an atheist but grew up highly religious so could easily fake it if I needed to.
    Discrimination isn't something I've ever really faced. But I have friends who have. Family who have. And if I ever came out as atheist to the known world, I would. I can't change the world. Really not trying to. BUT, what I can, and WILL do, is teach Tech that ppl are ppl, no matter who they love, worship, what color they are, whether they follow sports or are more likely to be found at a geek-con.
    We recognize that women got an unfair shake in history. We recognize that black achievements were white-washed. We are even starting to acknowledge that the Native American culture was incredibly more advanced and complex than we thought and that what we knew, isn't what we know now. One day, hopefully one day soon, we'll realize, as a country, perhaps as a world, that we've heteronormalized history and that, perhaps, many of the "greats" were a little less straight than previously thought.

  11. #40

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    I guess the conclusion I came to from Tanaquis post way back then was that it wasnt enough to teach my boy that we are all humans underneath whatever veneer we present to the world.
    I shouldnt just complacently sit back, content that my kid wasnt going to be racist, or prejudiced.
    He has to be made aware that its not the same for everyone, that people who dont conform to the dominant *way* are treated differently from a really young age. Thats got to be taught, and recognized.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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Is it Time to Include LGBTQ History?