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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miri Morgenstern View Post
    Would you consider beta testing some of our materials? We would love to get some feedback on a few stories and games we've developed for younger children. We also have materials we would like to beta test for 7th-12th grade.
    I know you were asking Soulhammer, but I'd love to test out the high school materials. My daughters are both advocates for marriage equality and gay rights. We've all championed for the LGBTQ community in our area. I love the idea of this entire thing! I just posted on my Facebook page a link to the HUE site yesterday saying I hope something like this could come to Idaho.
    Homeschooling Mamarama
    Native Idahoan Atheist
    Eclectically homeschooling since 2006.

    Son (20) - Class of 2014
    Daughter (17) - Class of 2016
    Daughter (15) - Class of 2019

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  3. #22

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    How does a casual parent teach or incorporate LGBTQ awareness with their kids?
    I vote for marriage equality, and have no trouble with the genderly obscured workers at our local starbucks (other than not having any visible social cues for me to guess their gender identity).

    Do I wait until my son is old enough to be interested in gender differences, until he grows armpit hair?
    Is the best approach to set aside a month each year to actively discuss it? For all that there is Black History month, most of our discussions about racism take place in the middle of January for MLK day.
    Is making a big production over the differences counterproductive to fostering an attitude of indifference about other peoples sexual and gender orientations? Just as I dont really care about the color of a persons skin, I dont really care what a persons gender or sexual preference is, as long as they give me my starbucks with a smile.

    Im open minded to suggestions, but like racism, its not a huge issue for me. Boy / Girl / Other works fine for me. (Other than a logistic issue about bathrooms - and if youre in a stall, that doesnt really matter to me either.)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #23

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    I like the idea of an LGBTQ History Month. I'm not entirely sure we would talk about it during that month. Cosplay has a LOT of gender bending, gender swapping, ambiguous gender, costumes, so it will probably get discussed leading into a con. Or going to visit his aunts. Or if the aunts decide on a legal ceremony.

    But I think ppl, kids especially need to learn about things like the Stonewall Riots, and Matthew Shepherd and other notable moments in recent LGBTQ history. I didn't even know anything about any of it until I was out on my own, and it was a bit of a shock.

  5. #24

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    The Civil Rights movement can (and should) start it include LGBT facts and major events.

    October is National LGBT month in the US because of the National Coming Out day on the 11th. I think it gets down played because of breast cancer and since Hispanic History Month is partially in Oct too.
    ~*~*Marta, mom to 5 boys.
    DS 1 ( 19, has his associates' degree and is off to college)
    DS 2 (17 and dual enrollment in college)
    Keegan (15 and enrolled in a PPP but still has home classes)
    Sully (10 years, 4th grade)
    Finn, (9 years, 3rd grade)

  6. #25

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    Thank you for sharing her blog! Love it! My trans daughter and I started a local LGBTQ Youth group and I'm always looking for interesting things to share. This is perfect.

  7. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    This might help. My dd (now a college freshman) blogs frequently about LGBTQ literature. This link will take you to a regular feature she does reviewing books with LGBTQ characters or themes.

    She also writes quite a bit about LGBTQ issues in general. Feel free to poke around her blog a bit.
    Thank you for sharing her blog! Love it! My trans daughter and I started a local LGBTQ Youth group and I'm always looking for interesting things to share. This is perfect.

  8. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexsmom View Post
    How does a casual parent teach or incorporate LGBTQ awareness with their kids?
    I vote for marriage equality, and have no trouble with the genderly obscured workers at our local starbucks (other than not having any visible social cues for me to guess their gender identity).

    Do I wait until my son is old enough to be interested in gender differences, until he grows armpit hair?
    Is the best approach to set aside a month each year to actively discuss it? For all that there is Black History month, most of our discussions about racism take place in the middle of January for MLK day.
    Is making a big production over the differences counterproductive to fostering an attitude of indifference about other peoples sexual and gender orientations? Just as I dont really care about the color of a persons skin, I dont really care what a persons gender or sexual preference is, as long as they give me my starbucks with a smile.

    Im open minded to suggestions, but like racism, its not a huge issue for me. Boy / Girl / Other works fine for me. (Other than a logistic issue about bathrooms - and if youre in a stall, that doesnt really matter to me either.)
    Kids are aware of gender differences from a really young age. There are some great children's books out there that address issues like being transgender, like I am Jazz. I think a lot of it is just keeping an eye out for sources that show a variety of families, partners, gender expression etc.

  9. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by hippiebutterfly View Post
    I know you were asking Soulhammer, but I'd love to test out the high school materials. My daughters are both advocates for marriage equality and gay rights. We've all championed for the LGBTQ community in our area. I love the idea of this entire thing! I just posted on my Facebook page a link to the HUE site yesterday saying I hope something like this could come to Idaho.
    Yes! We are looking for people who would like to test out some of our products. Just shoot me an email([email protected]) and I will send you pdfs of a case study - with a video available on youtube. Thank you!

  10. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by teglene View Post
    Thank you for sharing her blog! Love it! My trans daughter and I started a local LGBTQ Youth group and I'm always looking for interesting things to share. This is perfect.
    You're welcome. Feel free to leave comments on her blog--she loves them!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter (22), a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son (21), a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  11. #30

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    Maybe it is time to extend the discussion from is it time, to how will you or do you do it? (Include LGBTQ history, content, connections)

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Is it Time to Include LGBTQ History?