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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soulhammer View Post
    I'd pay money for more well-written literature for kids and young adults that includes central LGBT characters. I'd buy picture books that celebrate gender fluidity, esp. for my youngest. I'd pay money for unit studies that focus on Stonewall, marriage equality, and specific LGBT figures. I'd also pay for materials to help educate my son about how to be a better ally in some of the extremely conservative spaces in which we function as homeschoolers.
    This might help. My dd (now a college freshman) blogs frequently about LGBTQ literature. This link will take you to a regular feature she does reviewing books with LGBTQ characters or themes.

    She also writes quite a bit about LGBTQ issues in general. Feel free to poke around her blog a bit.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

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  3. #12

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    And for a more varied group of posts, check starting here . She blogged through the entire month of June about LGBTQ issues, including some history.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  4. #13

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    There are so many LGBT figures in history.....

    Gay Kings, Bi Kings, Gay Rulers, Gay Authors, Gay President, Lesbian/Bi First Lady......

    These parts have been written out of histories, or have became jokes.

    So many of them met with terrible ends because of their sexuality. (A few didn't) I guess if we concentrate on who they were, how they lived and changed things instead of their ends, it would be "easier".

    And it was "hidden" in so many cases. We can guess and speculate, but there is not a lot of proof (through out history) I guess we study the proofs we do have.
    Personally until the 1900's being LGBT is just a footnote. (Mostly, there may be a few examples that are otherwise) The real change and history starts with the LGBT movement and living out.

    I don't stray away from it especially starting during the Middle school ages. My kids (who have had a mixture of homeschool and public school) have gay classmates and friends. To them it is not a big deal (at all).
    ~*~*Marta, mom to 5 boys.
    DS 1 ( 19, has his associates' degree and is off to college)
    DS 2 (17 and dual enrollment in college)
    Keegan (15 and enrolled in a PPP but still has home classes)
    Sully (10 years, 4th grade)
    Finn, (9 years, 3rd grade)

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miri Morgenstern View Post
    No, the question isn't just about fear from religious groups - we've surveyed many teachers and parents and there is a generals concern among some that children will be confused. Teachers fear offending students/parents. They also lack resources. Of course, I am sure that there are many homeschooling families who would object to teaching about LGBTQ activism/history!
    The problem I see is that if you don't teach LGBTQ inclusion along with everything else, from the beginning, you will end up having to teach it when you least expect it and things can go very wrong. This is exactly what happened to my son when he was 10. (I may have talked about this here before.) When he was in 5th grade he made a survey asking people their favorite color for a science fair project and threw in a question asking if the person answering the question was a boy or girl. He got over 1000 responses from my sister's fan fiction blog, but got many many complaints about the boy/girl question because it was required and people were unable to finish the survey. After reading several comments from those who objected to the question, my 10 year old had no problem understanding that he needed to add an "other" option to the question. However, one school administrator had a problem and refused to display his project - almost turning an elementary science fair project into a media mess when I got very very angry.

    What I have found was that younger kids had absolutely no problem with the idea that some people did not identify as a boy or girl. All it took was a simple and easy explanation. They have questions, sure, but young kids don't get confused. They just tuck new knowledge away for future use. But adults had issues and a lot of trouble understanding.

    I think that it is less about including LGBTQ history, and more general inclusion. History is just one part of inclusion. Why not include math word problems? Why not stories in early readers? Why not science fair questions with an other option for gender?

    This is the story of how my kid learned about the T in LGBTQ. He had 5% of over 1000 responses choose other in his science fair project. Now he just automatically includes an other option. It is no big deal to him now, and it was not then. https://thefourthvine.dreamwidth.org/100942.html
    Mom to two boys
    14 year old/9th grade homeschooler
    Non homeschooled son heading to Reed College this fall, and proudly wearing his Reed/Atheist t-shirt.

    I spend a lot of time sitting in an ice skating rink - still

  6. #15

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    I was fortunate that DS gave me the opening I needed to talk about this topic. When he was 3 we were at the market and he noticed a family with two daddies! For about a year, he would point out every family that had two mommies or two daddies. (Not sure what the fascination was, but I took it.) That gave me the opportunity to talk about different kinds of families. We read Tango Makes Three and we have continued to discuss how families all look different.

    Since then I have been incorporating LGBT into our readings.

    I have found GLSEN to have great resources for education. They have a list of books for elementary aged kids on their website.

    http://www.glsen.org/article/celebra...ons-grades-k-5
    Last edited by Mariam; 02-09-2016 at 11:04 AM.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  7. #16

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    Oh wow LKnomad, you hadnt shared the story, only that you were (he was) being audited on the science fair project he didnt have in the essay.

    How did that work out?
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #17

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    AM - I was not sure how much I shared. Last we heard the UC system had rejected his first attempt at verification. He sent them the blog links that I posted above, which pretty much proved his essay was legit. They asked for the actual surveys. Luckily I still have them on Survey Monkey. He took screen shots and we got a "verification received" email then nothing. I assume all is well.

    The situation made a fabulous essay. He talked about the importance of trying to give people a voice and how having that "other" is one way for people to be heard. He sent this essay to every college he applied to. This was a pretty eye opening experience for him and for me as well.
    Mom to two boys
    14 year old/9th grade homeschooler
    Non homeschooled son heading to Reed College this fall, and proudly wearing his Reed/Atheist t-shirt.

    I spend a lot of time sitting in an ice skating rink - still

  9. #18
    Senior Member Enlightened Soulhammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    This might help. My dd (now a college freshman) blogs frequently about LGBTQ literature. This link will take you to a regular feature she does reviewing books with LGBTQ characters or themes.

    She also writes quite a bit about LGBTQ issues in general. Feel free to poke around her blog a bit.

    Thanks! That's awesome.

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by hippiebutterfly View Post
    I have a hard time believing that secular families would object to teaching about the LGBTQ activism/history. Most I've known have been pretty open minded. I feel like it is the conservative groups in our country that find such issues offensive. Fear drives their motives out of ignorance. I wonder if the fear the teachers express about offending comes from the closed mindedness of the families of whom these children belong? We aren't talking about discussing the sex lives of the LGBTQ individuals (of which conservatives find so offensive), we are talking about the major contributions and societal changes they have influenced. I guess I don't understand how including their stories in the rich history of humankind would offend.
    Teachers are worried about parents. And you are right, secular families are very open-minded about LGBTQ content and history.

  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soulhammer View Post
    I'd pay money for more well-written literature for kids and young adults that includes central LGBT characters. I'd buy picture books that celebrate gender fluidity, esp. for my youngest. I'd pay money for unit studies that focus on Stonewall, marriage equality, and specific LGBT figures. I'd also pay for materials to help educate my son about how to be a better ally in some of the extremely conservative spaces in which we function as homeschoolers.
    Would you consider beta testing some of our materials? We would love to get some feedback on a few stories and games we've developed for younger children. We also have materials we would like to beta test for 7th-12th grade.

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Is it Time to Include LGBTQ History?