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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    Sometimes parents in homeschool groups have special talents they can share. A mom in our group grew up as a missionary kid in Mexico. She was a great tutor when dd needed help in Spanish. I in turn help other kids with math.

    FWP, as you already know, my kids have done dual credit courses as well. And yes, typically the university or CC wants the kids to be at least a junior. HOWEVER, some do make unpublicized exceptions. If your child can score fairly high on the SAT or ACT, some places will allow the student to enroll. My son started dual credit as a high school freshman--just one class per semester, after taking the SAT at the end of his 8th grade year. (DD started as a sophomore the same year, taking the SAT as a freshman.)

    And collaboration is great, but there is also a lot to be said about letting the kid drive the learning at some point. For example, DS is entirely self-taught in programming. He learned far more on his own than I'd EVER be able to teach him. He used books, online forums, and open source ideas. He followed up by finding a local internship with a family acquaintance. Once a kid is 16, 17, 18 years old, I think it's even more important to let him/her drive the process.
    And sometimes the things kids choose to learn when they are "driving the learning" (I love that quote!) take them somewhere and connects them to areas you and others never intended or thought of when thinking of the course of study. For example, this year Sean chose a political candidate. He decided to start a Facebook Group for his candidate. Growing that has been a learning experience, as of today it has 750 members; he created it 1 month ago). He has decided he should network to grow it more, so he has written a letter to private message to other groups who support the candidate. So from the year devoted to American Government and Politics that I envisioned, has been added networking, advertising, starting a grassroots movement, some real world business issues such as how you present yourself (including why punctuation and spelling matter, if you want people to take you seriously ), how you can use your writing to get people to rethink their positions. These are things where Sean is driving the learning.
    Blair Lee loves to read, cook, laugh, hang out with friends, and homeschool. In 2015, she co-founded Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers, SEA Homeschoolers blog and SEA Homeschoolers on Facebook. Blair writes for the Real Science Odyssey Series, RSO, as well as blogs and magazines. Blair speaks about eclectic, academic homeschooling, science, and travel at homeschool conventions. You can follow her at blairleeblog, Twitter, Facebook, and Katch.

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  3. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blair Lee View Post
    I prefer in person tutoring sessions. I live in San Diego, so we have options. I have also hired a college student to help with one computer program Sean could not figure out. To find the tutor I am using for Sean's writing this year I searched through Google, and then chose someone who had great reviews. If you live in a more remote area, there are good online resources. Sean has taken classes with Brave Writer, and Crime Scene Camps with Thom Jones, Crime Scene Camps. Sometimes it helps to just ask. I noticed that Thom is a very good writer, so this year I asked Thom if he would give Sean some feedback on his writing, and he said yes.
    I was looking at both Brave Writer and Fortuigence for classes. They both look great! We live in a semi-rural area and I don't think there are a lot of options. I thought about contacting the writing center at the local community college for recommendations, though.

    Erica

  4. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by fastweedpuller View Post
    Thanks, Blair and Carol.

    A lot of my doubt is in the "too far in the future to see" category. Like Blair, I have felt pretty confident I could teach anything at the elementary level. And like you've often said, Carol, our kids are different kids entirely once they're about 15! Maybe the kid's stuck under her parental microscope but the changes I usually see in her academically/developmentally are just so gradual. Add it all up and yes she's been able to do so much more. But will all this incremental change mean she'll be able to take community college classes by 15 or 16? That's almost impossible to say, though I hope so!

    (And I am not trying to rush anything, necessarily. We're homeschooling because private school just didn't work for her distracted self...and we were unwilling to try public school. And I think I am always in the "am I doing enough, well enough" mode. I don't know if I will ever be fully comfortable with the "she'll get there in her own time" philosophy.)
    The incremental changes make me a nervous wreck sometimes! That is one of the main reasons I am a fan of keeping a portfolio. With a portfolio it is so much easier to monitor the progress. It also helps remind me that learning is a journey. When I focus on the journey instead of the destination the journey is better. It helps to have mini goals as a main component of the overall goal. That way you can feel real success with smaller bit-sized successes. I have to watch it when I get stressed with the question of, "Am I doing enough, well enough", which I do. The reason I have to watch it is Sean thinks I am questioning his over-all performance and not mine.

    I think it can help ease the stress and worry by answering the question, "What do you and your family think the purpose of an education is/should be?" There is no right or wrong answer to this question. For me the answer is that the main purpose of an education is that at the end of it a person is well-educated, with the caveat that we define what well-educated means in our house. We also think an education should lead to a person who loves learning and who understands how to learn. We are trying to figure all of this out organically using innovative and eclectic approaches. Will this approach allow my son to take college classes next year? Probably, but not definitely. We decided that the emphasis for his journey through learning would not be about how to get him into college. Getting into college will be a result of this process, but for the purpose of his education it’s not the purpose of the process we use. There will be colleges that don’t agree with me on this emphasis. That’s okay. Not every college is right for every person. Eclectic, academic kids should probably seek out eclectic, academic colleges anyway.

    We are a big fan of academics and learning in our house. I do choose some rigorous coursework and hold him to a standard of work I know he is capable of. Sean and I are in a partnership as far as his education goes, but I am the overall boss. Like I have told him a time or two or even three ;-) I have a lot more insight into why he needs to learn something. “No, Sean a 10 year old cannot stop learning math, because he does not find it a creative endeavor!” I have stopped worrying though, if his standard doesn't match with someone else's. After all, he isn’t someone else.
    Last edited by Blair Lee; 11-03-2015 at 02:12 PM.
    Blair Lee loves to read, cook, laugh, hang out with friends, and homeschool. In 2015, she co-founded Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers, SEA Homeschoolers blog and SEA Homeschoolers on Facebook. Blair writes for the Real Science Odyssey Series, RSO, as well as blogs and magazines. Blair speaks about eclectic, academic homeschooling, science, and travel at homeschool conventions. You can follow her at blairleeblog, Twitter, Facebook, and Katch.

  5. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    To be completely honest, I wasn't 100% comfortable that our decision to homeschool our kids was the right one until they hit junior year!! We viewed it as an experiment that worked at that point. We were constantly re-evaluting if a brick and mortar school would be better at some point.
    This year 10th grade was the first year I was absolutely positive we got it right all along! The self-doubt, my self-doubt about the quality of the job I am doing, is gone. Homeschooling parents care so much about their child's education I think the doubts are inevitable. I also think they are beneficial, because they keep us paying attention to this very important responsibility we have taken on. One thing to remember though, no one cares more about your child's education than you do, including the employees of the brick and mortar schools.
    Blair Lee loves to read, cook, laugh, hang out with friends, and homeschool. In 2015, she co-founded Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers, SEA Homeschoolers blog and SEA Homeschoolers on Facebook. Blair writes for the Real Science Odyssey Series, RSO, as well as blogs and magazines. Blair speaks about eclectic, academic homeschooling, science, and travel at homeschool conventions. You can follow her at blairleeblog, Twitter, Facebook, and Katch.

  6. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebh87 View Post
    I was looking at both Brave Writer and Fortuigence for classes. They both look great! We live in a semi-rural area and I don't think there are a lot of options. I thought about contacting the writing center at the local community college for recommendations, though.

    Erica
    I would definitely contact the local CC. You might even snag an adjust professor.
    Last edited by Blair Lee; 11-03-2015 at 02:15 PM. Reason: typo
    Blair Lee loves to read, cook, laugh, hang out with friends, and homeschool. In 2015, she co-founded Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers, SEA Homeschoolers blog and SEA Homeschoolers on Facebook. Blair writes for the Real Science Odyssey Series, RSO, as well as blogs and magazines. Blair speaks about eclectic, academic homeschooling, science, and travel at homeschool conventions. You can follow her at blairleeblog, Twitter, Facebook, and Katch.

  7. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blair Lee View Post
    I would definitely contact the local CC. You might even snag an adjust professor.
    Thank you! Because of your encouragement, I just did that.

  8. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebh87 View Post
    Thank you! Because of your encouragement, I just did that.
    Yeah! I know I am not alone in wanting to know how it goes
    Blair Lee loves to read, cook, laugh, hang out with friends, and homeschool. In 2015, she co-founded Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers, SEA Homeschoolers blog and SEA Homeschoolers on Facebook. Blair writes for the Real Science Odyssey Series, RSO, as well as blogs and magazines. Blair speaks about eclectic, academic homeschooling, science, and travel at homeschool conventions. You can follow her at blairleeblog, Twitter, Facebook, and Katch.

  9. #28

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    Blair, did you find it hard to find secular materials when you started homeschooling, way back when? How do you adapt religious material?
    Right now Im using a music appreciation curriculum that gets too religious for me, but I havent found anything secular that I like. Am I spoiled nowadays with secular options for almost everything else?


    (Waving to you from San Marcos.)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  10. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebh87 View Post
    All great ideas that I hadn't thought of. Thank you! I did just get a name of someone who is interested (a graduate student majoring in English). If she doesn't work out, then I will definitely use your other ideas. Thank you!

    Here in Ohio, students can start taking CC classes in 7th grade! One of my older children went to CC full-time in his junior and senior years and it was a good experience for him. I'm not sure when I should start my daughter. I like the idea of just having her take one class in her freshman year.

    Erica
    7th grade? That seems early for someone to start college. I had two high school students take chemistry classes from me, and they both struggled big time with the content and work load. The father of one of the students came by to talk to me after class one day to discuss his son's low grades. I had to tell him I couldn't talk to him about a student in my class. He pleaded with me to pass his son, because it was the only way his son could get into the college he most wanted to go to. Talk about a dilemma! I told him the only way I could give his son a good grade in the class is if he earned it. I suggested intensive tutoring.
    Blair Lee loves to read, cook, laugh, hang out with friends, and homeschool. In 2015, she co-founded Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers, SEA Homeschoolers blog and SEA Homeschoolers on Facebook. Blair writes for the Real Science Odyssey Series, RSO, as well as blogs and magazines. Blair speaks about eclectic, academic homeschooling, science, and travel at homeschool conventions. You can follow her at blairleeblog, Twitter, Facebook, and Katch.

  11. #30

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    Real world work seem to be becoming a big part of ds' education ( secular, eclectic, not super duper academic but good enough )

    He's an assistant drama teacher once a week, he hosts and moderates on a gaming server thingy most days and he fundraises for animal charities.

    As long as we get daily maths and English/reading in there, and hit science and history a couple of times a week, plus PE and social time, I feel like we're adding in enough 'academics' to round out his education.

    The most valuable parts of his education still come from his real world stuff and books. I'm looking forward to seeing what he explores during his teen years.

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