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  1. #11

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    I'm so excited about this discussion. Richard Louv is one of my absolute favorites. I swear if everyone read Last Child in the Woods, the world would be a much happier place
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  3. #12
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    One fun way we integrated nature into our learning in the elementary years was that we saved all our dedicated science learning for the summer. Science was just made for outdoors, IMHO. So whether we were reading science books, doing experiments, or collecting specimens, it all happened during the summer, and it all happened outside - - in our yard, in parks, on hikes, etc. The house never got messy from too much vinegar and baking soda, it encouraged us to keep our brains active year round, and it forced the boys to be outside even on days when they might have preferred to be glued to a screen of some sort. Win/win.


  4. #13

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    Right?! Me too.

  5. #14

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    That's really smart for colder climates or people who can't get outside all the time.

  6. #15

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    We're way out on the edges of wilderness school here. Considering that our last couple months of "kindergarten" (for my 6yo) and preschool (for my 4yo) involved a 350 mile ski expedition on sea ice around a remote Alaska peninsula. But my husband and I were adventurers long before kids, and that's just how our family lives. Even at home, we live in a tiny town, not on the road system, right by the mountains and the ocean, and forests. One thing that I love about it is the opportunity to wonder and question and theorize without immediately being able to turn to Google. How finding old sod houses leads to long history discussions, and watching bird rookeries leads to discussions of flight patterns and body shapes and the different adaptations and feeding strategies of different birds. How creative the kids get, out in nature, and how adaptable. How much can be learned through long conversations.

  7. #16

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    Nope, not needed.

    I just read on a Facebook homeschooling page all we really need for homeschooling are workbooks from the discount store. Sure takes the pressure off of worrying about all this how to best implement all-this-outdoor-learning.
    Mom to:
    DS 7 (2nd grader, PS up until mid 1st grade)
    DS 5 (Kindergartner)
    DD 3 (Pre-schooler)

  8. #17
    Senior Member Arrived Elly's Avatar
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    I've been trying to include more outside time in our lives generally (aiming for the 1000 hours outside!). We are lucky being in Northern CA that we have weather that's mostly conducive to being outside much of the year. I remember the first time I took DS on a hike about 2 years ago, he was terrified of what might happen. Now, he's great at spotting all sorts of animals (rabbits last Saturday, he found a birds nest yesterday). I am trying to schedule our days so morning are work time and afternoons are outside time; we'll see how that goes next school year

    Elly
    4th year of homeschooling DS, now 9!

  9. #18
    Site Admin Arrived Topsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lohavio View Post
    Nope, not needed.

    I just read on a Facebook homeschooling page all we really need for homeschooling are workbooks from the discount store. Sure takes the pressure off of worrying about all this how to best implement all-this-outdoor-learning.
    LOL, Lohavio. Pressure off, indeed!


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