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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Ipsy View Post
    I would have never considered homeschooling either before my youngest came along.
    It's so funny how a completely different path can take shape. Mothers are so great at doing what their children need. I jumped in headfirst and was so scared but it has been such a wonderful learning experience and positive (most days).
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ejsmom View Post
    Asynchrony and frustration and giftedness are so misunderstood. It's NOT just "gifted" as in "high achieving". Sometimes the gap between the high potential on one end, and the struggle on the other, is a very extreme gap. I tossed out the idea of sending DS to a private school this week, and DH asked where would we possibly send him and what grade would they put him in? College level for his reading/vocab abilities? 4th grade for the one subject he struggles with (math)? High School for his history/science? His age level (12 years old) where he does almost no work at that grade level?

    There just is no good answer for that, and thus we homeschool.

    We are total accidental homeschoolers. DS was tested for K and the school flat out told us they did not have any idea what to do with him. He had intellectual gifts, yes, and severe challenges, as well. For the first time in 6 or 7 years we are going for a full educational assessment in a few weeks. To move forward into the second half of his education, I need to know more about his challenges and how to use his strengths to his best advantage. He reads and absorbs and processes information in a way that is so different, that I understand his frustration at times. What I don't know is how to best help him navigate all this. No one seems to.
    I love the phrase "accidental homeschoolers" - it is just so true! It can be such a struggle to educate an asynchronous learner. It is something that a lot of folks don't think about. I'm only at the beginning of this road but I can tell it's going to be a long one. I think you are wonderful for sticking with it and figuring out what works for you child. Please keep me posted on how your next eval goes and next steps. I am fascinated by these children and I love them dearly. I wish there was an easy way to figure out what would work best. Best wishes to you, and thanks for sharing your story!
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFoxZoo View Post
    Thanks for sharing this. Its difficult to see and hear people talk about gifted learners who don't have experience or knowledge about them. A lot of the time it seems like some parents or teachers are sarcastically saying, "Oh poor you with the high achievers, wah wah." But giftedness is an exceptionality that is widely misunderstood and frequently left unrecognized in public schools.

    Oh geez, I started writing this morning and refreshed the page and now I can't find the original post. Anyway, I'll go from memory. We started talking about HSing because I believe my DS4 to be gifted, and as a former gifted ps teacher, I believe he would be ignored and could be treated as a problem child for, at very least, his primary years. I know this because I was basically told to ignore my gifted students because they "would pick it up" without much help from me. I was repeatedly told to focus on the bottom 25% even though I had EPs to follow from both sides.

    I'm sorry I can't remember everything else you wrote, but it was like I was reading about my own kid. Sometimes it's like talking to a ten year old but caring for a toddler. At three he would get so frustrated because he didn't know how to read his books - he prefers dinosaur and space encyclopedia type reference books. He also became obsessed with extinction, but wasn't afraid. He's actually oddly stoic. His latest is an obsession with where our meat comes from. When the cow goes extinct we will eat him. When we go extinct who will eat us? Yikes!
    So sorry, The Fox Zoo. I had a technical situation earlier today but it's fixed now. Along with suddenly, unexpectedly homeschooling, I was also an unexpected blogger Sometimes I'm still baffled and will laugh that i have a blog. I am NOT tech-savvy.

    Anyway... I can appreciate your point of view. I went to Tufts for school psych and I did not receive sufficient training on giftedness, let alone 2e kiddos. And... I'm the one expected to ASSESS these children. Tufts is a fantastic school but I also asked colleagues who attended other schools. Not a single one had adequate gifted training. That speaks volumes. I wrote a post on what I wish I had learned for Gifted Homeschoolers Forum last September. Having trouble linking it here but it's a shame when our education system fails to teach those who need to work with these children.

    And I loved your comment about your son wanting to read his own books. I can remember my son BAWLING at 2. He could "read" the books from memory but couldn't actually "read the letters"- so hard for these kiddos! Thanks for sharing your story!
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by ejsmom View Post
    Asynchrony and frustration and giftedness are so misunderstood. It's NOT just "gifted" as in "high achieving". Sometimes the gap between the high potential on one end, and the struggle on the other, is a very extreme gap. I tossed out the idea of sending DS to a private school this week, and DH asked where would we possibly send him and what grade would they put him in? College level for his reading/vocab abilities? 4th grade for the one subject he struggles with (math)? High School for his history/science? His age level (12 years old) where he does almost no work at that grade level?

    There just is no good answer for that, and thus we homeschool.

    We are total accidental homeschoolers. DS was tested for K and the school flat out told us they did not have any idea what to do with him. He had intellectual gifts, yes, and severe challenges, as well. For the first time in 6 or 7 years we are going for a full educational assessment in a few weeks. To move forward into the second half of his education, I need to know more about his challenges and how to use his strengths to his best advantage. He reads and absorbs and processes information in a way that is so different, that I understand his frustration at times. What I don't know is how to best help him navigate all this. No one seems to.

    I am always frustrated about the achievement vs. gifted issue. So many educators fall into the trap and it makes public school especially challenging. Plus, like you said, how can you meet such asynchronous needs in that setting?

    Please let me know how the assessment goes! I love hearing about these kids!
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  6. #15

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    Ah. Asynchronous Development. I have a 12 year old who reads Homer and writes novels for fun, can't be left home alone while I run to the store for rug shampoo. There are stories.

    I always found it funny how when my daughter was diagnosed with ASD I was offered support and love, and when the IQ test results came in later, and I shared the information with the same group of people, the support evaporated and I heard a lot of comments like "Well, aren't you lucky?". I had no words to describe why high IQ and increased asynchrony might make life more challenging for her (At one point, in her 3rd grade year, I sat with functional test results in front of me with scores that ranged from 3.5 years to college age).

    "Gifted" is a loaded label. It's not that I want pity for having such wonderful and fascinating people as my children, but the lack of understanding of the challenges involved from friends, family and community can be frustrating at times.

    Cait--If you don't mind me asking, what materials are you using with your son? I'm still struggling to put together a plan for next year for my son (8 in a couple of weeks) and I'm collecting ideas.

    Anyone--I've seen the statistics for 2E students tracked as "normal" or "learning disabled only" in public schools for things like adolescent depression, drug abuse, suicide and self harm. It's not good and one of the main reasons I've resisted putting our daughter back into formal school during middle school (she's watched some shows about kids in highschool and wants that experience). Does anyone know if those outcomes are statistically changed when 2E children are home schooled? I'm not sure it's an area anyone would have bothered to do formal research, but I'm curious if I'm missing a study.
    AtomicGirl--Mom, old enough to know better
    Athena--13, 8th grade, home schooled, 2E, wicked cool
    Monkey King- 8, 3rd grade, home schooled, future owner of the galaxy

  7. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicgirl View Post
    Ah. Asynchronous Development. I have a 12 year old who reads Homer and writes novels for fun, can't be left home alone while I run to the store for rug shampoo. There are stories.

    I always found it funny how when my daughter was diagnosed with ASD I was offered support and love, and when the IQ test results came in later, and I shared the information with the same group of people, the support evaporated and I heard a lot of comments like "Well, aren't you lucky?". I had no words to describe why high IQ and increased asynchrony might make life more challenging for her (At one point, in her 3rd grade year, I sat with functional test results in front of me with scores that ranged from 3.5 years to college age).

    "Gifted" is a loaded label. It's not that I want pity for having such wonderful and fascinating people as my children, but the lack of understanding of the challenges involved from friends, family and community can be frustrating at times.

    Cait--If you don't mind me asking, what materials are you using with your son? I'm still struggling to put together a plan for next year for my son (8 in a couple of weeks) and I'm collecting ideas.

    Anyone--I've seen the statistics for 2E students tracked as "normal" or "learning disabled only" in public schools for things like adolescent depression, drug abuse, suicide and self harm. It's not good and one of the main reasons I've resisted putting our daughter back into formal school during middle school (she's watched some shows about kids in highschool and wants that experience). Does anyone know if those outcomes are statistically changed when 2E children are home schooled? I'm not sure it's an area anyone would have bothered to do formal research, but I'm curious if I'm missing a study.
    Three and a half to college- that's some asynchronous development right there!

    I, too, feel frustrated by the label and the assumptions and misconceptions. I feel like I'm forever explaining to no avail.

    Regarding your last point, I have not seen a study but am curious, too. I would think homeschooling has a better outcome, if only because you are meeting those unique needs better than they would otherwise be met in a school setting. But I also want to think that outcome would be better so I'm biased

    Oh, materials... I use so many. When I first started homeschooling, I met a neighbor who has been homeschooling her teenage son for several years. She is the most generous woman and she gave us all of her old curriculum. Just handed it over and would accept nothing, just told me to pay it forward one day (and I sure will!). So, I have a bunch. My guy is seven and this was our very first year so we were sort of all over the road, trying a little of this and a little of that, including (but please let me emphasize that this is not every day- we are very relaxed but this guy blows through material and then will refuse others after liking it):

    MOST of what we do is based on library books. I let him dive down rabbit holes so he might be heavy into science for a few weeks and then switch to poetry. Etc. We've also used:

    - Singapore Math
    - Bedtime Math
    - Life of Fred
    - Just started Beast Academy
    - EPGY (now giftedandtalented.com- we signed up last May and probably won't renew although it was helpful for both math and language arts, especially starting off)
    - a little Bravewriter
    - Draw Write Now
    - Handwriting without Tears
    - Brain Pop
    - The horrible histories, geography, science, and math series
    - Story of the World (he likes to listen to it on audiobook and follow along in text)
    - All the Usborne internet linked texts and encyclopedias
    - Science experiments

    That's off of the top of my head. I'm sure I'm forgetting others but let me know if you have questions on any!
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  8. #17

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    So, do you consider what you do unschooling? The subject matter, and some learning materials we use, are student led, but I do focus heavily on meta-skills they need to succeed beyond my dining room (particularly things that fall into the executive function realm) and that is all very driven by me.
    AtomicGirl--Mom, old enough to know better
    Athena--13, 8th grade, home schooled, 2E, wicked cool
    Monkey King- 8, 3rd grade, home schooled, future owner of the galaxy

  9. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicgirl View Post
    So, do you consider what you do unschooling? The subject matter, and some learning materials we use, are student led, but I do focus heavily on meta-skills they need to succeed beyond my dining room (particularly things that fall into the executive function realm) and that is all very driven by me.
    So funny you should ask this, atomicgirl. I have a post that has been in my drafts forever about this topic. I tend to say that we are unschool leaning. My son is very self-motivated right now and he learns SO MUCH when I let him do his thing. I make sure (because I'm paranoid) that we're still covering math but most days we do without my trying to make sure we do- if that makes sense. He gets so much from reading alone that I'm always amazed.

    That said, when I say I'm unschooling here in NH, I am sometimes met with confrontation from the local unschoolers who say that I'm not unschooling. I think it gets tricky when you have a kid that loves textbooks- it's not a typical unschooling approach. So I'll often say that we are unschool-leaning or student led so as not to stir the pot.

    This brings up a completely different topic as to why some homeschoolers are so territorial about their philosophy that they actually divide the homeschool population. We all have different kids, so we should all do what those kids need. I have two more kids who I will likely homeschool at some point. Will they benefit from an unschool leaning approach? I have no idea, but I'll cross that bridge when we get there.

    I'm rambling but the short answer is I think I'm unschooling until I meet certain local unschoolers
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cait @ My Little Poppies View Post
    ... I think I'm unschooling until I meet certain local unschoolers
    Oh, I know this feeling! When I started this adventure I signed up for some listservs on homeschooling and teaching 2E kids. One sounded perfect from the description, but had almost no activity. I joined anyway and asked why there were so few messages. The reply was something along the lines of "We all took our kids out of PS, started unschooling, and now there aren't any problems to discuss." That sounded just like the solution I needed, so I started looking into it. Unfortunately, I realized that I'd never be able to do what the local people called "unschooling", but child-led sounded perfect. Suddenly, I discovered that I fit in nowhere.
    AtomicGirl--Mom, old enough to know better
    Athena--13, 8th grade, home schooled, 2E, wicked cool
    Monkey King- 8, 3rd grade, home schooled, future owner of the galaxy

  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicgirl View Post
    Oh, I know this feeling! When I started this adventure I signed up for some listservs on homeschooling and teaching 2E kids. One sounded perfect from the description, but had almost no activity. I joined anyway and asked why there were so few messages. The reply was something along the lines of "We all took our kids out of PS, started unschooling, and now there aren't any problems to discuss." That sounded just like the solution I needed, so I started looking into it. Unfortunately, I realized that I'd never be able to do what the local people called "unschooling", but child-led sounded perfect. Suddenly, I discovered that I fit in nowhere.
    I think that's just the thing. These kiddos don't fit in any box. I had a local girl get angry with me for writing about a summer computer program that my son was excited to try. She actually contacted me to tell me I wasn't unschooling. Unschool leaning, child led, ecelectic... whatever!
    Cait Fitz @ My Little Poppies

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Asynchronous Development: Many Ages at Once