Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11

    Default

    So far we have read the first two books of the Catwings series. DD5 loved it. She declared afterwards that she wanted to write stories about catwings. So I explained to her what fan fiction was. Then later when DH was home, she described Catwings to him and said "And I am a fan, and I am going to write fan fiction" (so funny). I also liked reading it. We could get through a whole book as a bedtime read, and it was a nice story.

    DH has been reading her My Father's Dragon.

    Still waiting on some of the others from the main library.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  2. T4L In Forum Sept19
  3. #12

    Default

    Another one of our favorite short books - Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

  4. #13

    Default

    Have you considered audio books? After picture books, it is difficult for me to read aloud for a sustained period of time. Audio books saved me. There are so many good ones. We download many of them from the library. It allows us to listen to stories that are above the reading level of my child, but with stories that are still age-appropriate topic wise.

    While we listen, we may color, draw or knit to keep hands busy.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  5. #14

    Default

    Yes, we do audiobooks as well. Mainly in the car, not much at home because they never seem to want to listen to them at home. We did have a really good one of Alice Through the Looking Glass by Naxos Audiobooks that they listened to everywhere, multiple times through. It was really well done and interesting. I guess that is the thing with audiobooks, sometimes the reading style just does not connect and they don't want to listen, but I will see if our library has more of the Naxos ones.

    The short chapter books are just what DD5 wants right now. She does not want to listen to picture books, and she wants better stories than the ones that are either mass produced fiction or written specifically for early readers to be able to read then. But she also wants something that can be read to her completely within 30–45 min, so we can finish the entire story in a sitting.
    New Zealand-based. DD 11 (year 6 [NZ system]) homeschooled, and DD 6 (year 1 [NZ system]) who is currently trying out public school.

    Freelance copyeditor, specializing in scientific text, who will make mistakes in my posts (I don't self-edit).

    That's a kea (NZ parrot) in my avatar. You can learn about them on Beak & Brain - Genius Birds from Down Under on Netflix.

  6. #15

    Default

    My kids love audiobooks produced by Radio Theater. They are pretty close to the original text, by have different voices for different characters and other sound effects.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/16...=ATVPDKIKX0DER
    mom to 3 girls: DD10, DD9, DD6

  7. #16

    Default

    I would also add the Magic Treehouse Series, I read them aloud to all my kids at that age and they loved them. They are quick and there are still facts that my kids remember from them. There are so many of them that you could find a topic your 5 yo loves and start there. They are not books that you would want to read by yourself, but they were huge hits for my kids.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  8. #17

    Default

    My daughter still loves the short stories of Joan Aiken as read-alouds (The Serial Garden collects some). Other shorter reads: The Lighthouse Family series, some of Gail Carson Levine, William Steig's Abel's Island,and the very quirky Earwig and the Witch by Diana Wynne Jones (her book The Ogre Downstairs is also short and fun--she is much loved at our house).

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Short but good chapter books for reading aloud