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  1. #11
    IEF
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    Morning read-alouds are absolutely delicious and one of my favourite things about having a grandkid-aged kid.



    We do schoolwork in the afternoons or early evenings before dinner so we don't have to rush through.

    I'm sorting through the millennials' old books and refuse to get rid of some downright cringeworthy twaddle, although I may hide it the worst of it from little ds until he's a bit older. I have one Babysitter's Club left for a souvenir, the complete set of the Anastasia books, two remaining Lurlene MacDaniels, and a bunch more cheap paperbacks that are too dated and too awful for anyone here to even remember.

    My mother saved all of her Penny Parrish books, which were the twaddle of her generation but quite interesting historical artifacts for millenial dd. My grandmother's beloved Little Colonel books had to be sold for groceries but are in the public domain now.

  2. T4L In Forum Sept19
  3. #12

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    I read aloud to my younger son until about a year ago, at age 12. The best book we read allowed was "It's So Amazing!: A Book about Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families" when he was about 10. That sure interesting bedtime reading. LOL.

    I miss reading allowed...He told me he was finally too old

  4. #13

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    So, are we weird? Anyone else still read fiction to their older kids? (and have them read to you) Funny thing is that the DH has been laid up for the past few weeks with a broken leg and other stuff, and has been listening in too. Trust me we really aren't, generally speaking, this hokey. But like I said, I was feeling silly and was starting to think I might stunt them in some way.

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaH View Post
    So, are we weird? Anyone else still read fiction to their older kids? (and have them read to you) Funny thing is that the DH has been laid up for the past few weeks with a broken leg and other stuff, and has been listening in too. Trust me we really aren't, generally speaking, this hokey. But like I said, I was feeling silly and was starting to think I might stunt them in some way.
    As homeschoolers go, Bella, you are not weird. I read aloud to my kids regularly until they were about 13, sporadically afterwards.

    FWIW, when my college-age daughter comes home on break, she heads to the library, selects books, then has me read aloud. There's just something about the plopping on the couch next to each other, quiet intimacy of read-alouds.
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

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