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  1. #11

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    What I loved most about SOTW was the Activity book - the list of additional reading for each chapter was a gold mine of great books - lots of folklore and mythology for different regions. I started SOTW when my oldest was only 4 and all we did was read books from those lists and listen to the audio version of the textbook. When it comes to the few chapters that treat biblical stories as history I just explained they were also myths. Like others said, you won't find another spine that is has interesting for the younger crowd. Though there is a series of fun books : Good Times Travel Agency series by Linda Bailey are funny and educational - colorful picture books where the kids get thrown back in time and have to spend some time there before they can go home. Time Warp Trio books are a fun way to learn some history as well - my boys loved those when they were younger. There are cartoons/TV show that was made from them as well.

    Science books - Magic School Bus books are great for elementary age kids - make science fun and interesting, there are a few Ms Frizzle goes to... books that are history related as well.

    I second (or third?) DK books - they have some beautiful books - some of which are now ebooks on iPads which means there are cool movies too. I think we have the insect book.

    Other cool iPad books are anything by TOUCHPRESS - elements, solar system, beautiful! They also have some apps/books for younger kids.
    Stay at home physicist - Mom to C (18 & off to college)) and J (15)
    https://homeschoolsciencegeek.wordpress.com

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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScienceGeek View Post
    Other cool iPad books are anything by TOUCHPRESS - elements, solar system, beautiful! They also have some apps/books for younger kids.
    This is the direction we are going more and more. I don't think I will be dropping cash for reference books much in the future. I have too many of them sitting around getting little use. Some of the iPad apps are like video textbooks/reference books.
    Julie,
    Former Homeschooler to two daughters, age 20 and in college and age 12 back in ps.

  4. #13

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    My DS8 loves the Usbourne/DK encyclopedias.

    My other favorite that I will never part with is my Janson's History of Art.

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScienceGeek View Post
    What I loved most about SOTW was the Activity book - the list of additional reading for each chapter was a gold mine of great books - lots of folklore and mythology for different regions. I started SOTW when my oldest was only 4 and all we did was read books from those lists and listen to the audio version of the textbook. When it comes to the few chapters that treat biblical stories as history I just explained they were also myths. Like others said, you won't find another spine that is has interesting for the younger crowd. Though there is a series of fun books : Good Times Travel Agency series by Linda Bailey are funny and educational - colorful picture books where the kids get thrown back in time and have to spend some time there before they can go home. Time Warp Trio books are a fun way to learn some history as well - my boys loved those when they were younger. There are cartoons/TV show that was made from them as well.

    Science books - Magic School Bus books are great for elementary age kids - make science fun and interesting, there are a few Ms Frizzle goes to... books that are history related as well.

    I second (or third?) DK books - they have some beautiful books - some of which are now ebooks on iPads which means there are cool movies too. I think we have the insect book.

    Other cool iPad books are anything by TOUCHPRESS - elements, solar system, beautiful! They also have some apps/books for younger kids.
    I'll look into the SOTW activity books!

    Oh yes... our daughter loves Magic School Bus! Stories hold her attention more than anything.

    We don't own Apple anything. :-\ I wonder if any of the apps will eventually make it to other platforms, because they look great! They even have Theodore Gray's Elements, one of my own favourites.

  6. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Accidental Homeschooler View Post
    This is the direction we are going more and more. I don't think I will be dropping cash for reference books much in the future. I have too many of them sitting around getting little use. Some of the iPad apps are like video textbooks/reference books.
    This is what I'm afraid of -- books collecting dust! That's why I'm hoping to hear about indispensable, super-awesome nonfiction / reference books that get used often. Are there ones in your home that do get leafed through frequently?

  7. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ikslo View Post
    My DS8 loves the Usbourne/DK encyclopedias.

    My other favorite that I will never part with is my Janson's History of Art.
    DK/Usborne seem to be foolproof choices. We inherited a large collection of arts books, but I'll add Janson's to my Amazon list in case it comes in handy when the kids are older! Thanks :-)

  8. #17

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    For younger elementary we loved DK Eyewitness books and Usborne Encyclopedias.

    The DK books have so many vibrant pictures and the Usborne you can use for years to come. I bought our encyclopedias about five years ago and they've proven invaluable resources.
    S - '06 and G - '05 - always homeschooled

  9. #18
    Senior Member Arrived skrink's Avatar
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    Dd always loved this: http://smile.amazon.com/Anatomy-arti...for+the+artist When she was little - like maybe 4 or 5? - she was fascinated with human anatomy. She pulled this off the shelf daily and poured over the pictures. It still gets used pretty often as reference.

    We have used our children's world atlas a lot. Star charts, too.
    Skrink - mama to my 14 yo wild woman

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Misha View Post
    For younger elementary we loved DK Eyewitness books and Usborne Encyclopedias.

    The DK books have so many vibrant pictures and the Usborne you can use for years to come. I bought our encyclopedias about five years ago and they've proven invaluable resources.
    Can't go wrong with Dk & Usborne, it seems. We've been checking some out from the library, and I have a hard time deciding what to purchase and what to simply borrow :-)

  11. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by skrink View Post
    Dd always loved this: Anatomy for the artist: Jeno Barcsay: 9781566192453: Amazon.com: Books When she was little - like maybe 4 or 5? - she was fascinated with human anatomy. She pulled this off the shelf daily and poured over the pictures. It still gets used pretty often as reference.

    We have used our children's world atlas a lot. Star charts, too.
    Anatomy! We have a couple of general titles on how our bodies work, but I hadn't thought of getting something more in-depth. Thanks for the recommendation.

    We have a world atlas that we should probably update when the kids are older.

    Do you have a telescope? If so, any recommendations? Right now we just search for stars and constellations with our naked eye, not sure if we'll take it a step further yet or not.

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