Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38
  1. #1
    Senior Member Evolved
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    825

    Default 'ADHD Does Not Exist' by Richard Saul

    AnonyMs commented in another thread about this book:

    http://time.com/25370/doctor-adhd-does-not-exist/

    I've read it and found it really interesting - probably one of the most thought provoking books on ADHD I've come across. I'd love to hear what others think of it, if you've read it, if you might...so I figured I'd bump it to a new thread. I'll post a comment of my own - but I'll need to take a minute to organize it so I don't ramble on!
    Last edited by pdpele; 04-14-2014 at 11:00 PM.

  2. Thank You Leaderboard
  3. #2

    Default

    I read a different article earlier this year about the doctor who pioneered ADD/ADHD and the gist of it was that he now believes that only a very small fraction of the diagnoses are correct and that the pharmaceutical industry is driving most diagnoses. I have worked with some kids who are so very classically and severely ADD that it do think it exists... But I've also seen so many kids who have it as a diagnosis where I don't see them as very different from other kids. Basically, I do think it is massively overdiagnosed and medicated...
    Want to read about my homeschool?
    http://farrarwilliams.wordpress.com
    Children's Books, Homeschooling and Random Musings...

    Want help homeschooling or sending kids to college?
    http://simplify4you.com/

  4. #3
    Senior Member Evolved Epiphany's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    376
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I have not read the book, but have a feeling that if little man were in ps, they would be pushing this diagnosis on him. To me he is just a very active little guy. He sits and does table work, but often talks through it, and is constantly needing to "fiddle' with something while we are working. He is out of his chair often etc. I am glad that he is learning in a setting where it is one on one and I can just let some of that stuff go. However, in a classroom, I am sure that it would not be tolerated.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Evolved Deli76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    953
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I don't believe in ADD/ADHD. Kids are naturally active and the youngest naturally have an attention span of 5 min or less because their brains are taking in so much and learning at a very fast pace. It makes no sense to sedate a child. I remember my mother had the doc put my little brother on rittilin (sp?) and he changed. It was the weirdest thing. As soon as we started our summer visit with my dad...he poured them all down the toilet. His customers ( physicians and psychologists) told him that stuff was bad news and it literally changed the composition of the brain. They were telling how addictive it was and how kids were becoming more psychotic and needed more meds to counter act the rittilin. And this was in the early 90's. And it just makes me so mad and sad to see these poor children on more and more meds because they think an active healthy child is "abnormal". I agree, there are some that are just a lot more active, but it just does not justify medicating and sedating children. But that is just my opinion.
    Bobo 13 yrs old - marches to the beat of her own drum, driven, out going and loud, yet she loves nature
    Booger Boy 21 yrs old - quiet, self assured, confident and laying his own path

    umbers cucumbers!!!!

  6. #5

    Default

    There's 'active child' and then there really is ADHD. My son cannot retain information, basically cannot learn, if he's left to his own devices and unmedicated. He's creative, yes, but he can't sit down and actually DO anything because five minutes in, his brain has moved on and he's forgotten what he was originally doing and can't focus. If he was in school and unmedicated, he would have been labeled #1: ADHD and #2: delayed in certain subjects because of his inability to retain information. By putting him on a nonstimulant, he's able to learn. He's able to progress. HE feels better about himself, and we don't have the struggles and periods of depression where he feels stupid and useless. Sure, he still struggles, and I know that I 'undermedicate' by public school standards, but by doing that, I like to think that he is able to learn to control his own impulses, bit by bit. It's hard sometimes. REALLY hard. I would love to not have him on meds, but I've tried it multiple times, and while he does okay for a little bit, maybe a couple of months, then it's like living a nightmare. Nobody should have to live a nightmare in their own brain...
    ---
    Sarah B., Oklahoma

    "By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the bitterest." - Confucius

    Blog: Our Sunnyview

    Less-than-Zenlike mother of:
    M1 - The Boy, age 11, home since 2009 - loves science, swimming, and folk music
    M2 - The Girl, age 9, home since 2012 - loves anatomy, the arts, and her violin

  7. #6

    Default

    What Sarah said.... times 100.

    ADHD goes waaaay beyond being "active" or "wriggly" or having a short attention span. It means that the brain is so overwhelmed by stimulation that sustained focus, impulse control, and even emotional control become very difficult. The problems aren't caused by unreasonable or inappropriate classroom expectations. They aren't cause by lax discipline or the wrong foods or lack of exercise. It's just the way they're wired and it is truly debilitating for some kids (like mine). Believe me, we tried the no meds route and it didn't work. My son had to leave a homeschooling group, almost got kicked out of his extra curricular activities, and couldn't even do the shortest and simplest assignment (even with me sitting beside him and leading him through every step). It was, as Sarah said, a nightmare that took its toll on the entire family. How do you think a kid feels when he's constantly failing at things and is seeing the people who love him frustrated and upset?

    This is not directed at you, OP, but to the doubters who have not lived with someone with ADHD.
    Mother of two monkeys...daughter age 10 and son age 11.5.

  8. #7

    Default

    I think that the "ADHD is real" vs. "ADHD is not real" distinction is obsessing about the wrong question. If a child exhibits behaviors that satisfy the diagnostic menu list for the disorder, he or she has the disorder as it's defined. That says absolutely nothing about the cause, the pathophysiology, the appropriateness of medications, etc. Only that the child meets the diagnostic criteria.

    I also don't completely fault the pharmaceutical industry for driving the ubiquity of the diagnosis. If over-diagnosis and over-medication exist (it probably does), the problem is multifactorial.

    Personally, I think there needs to be much more rigor in how well and how objectively kids on medications are evaluated. When I was practicing, I'd see people on these meds, and have no way of evaluating in an objective fashion whether they should be continued, because nothing was being tracked. We have to do a better job of making the benefits of these medications measurable in some way so that we can do a better job of assessing the tradeoffs (in terms of adverse effects; and there are always tradeoffs.)
    DD age 9, Grade 4ish

    Eclectic. We do music, math English, history/geography/culture, Russian and science. Lots and lots of reading. I blog at suzukiexperience.com

    WARNING: Unwittingly, I may occasionally say things to which you take offence.

  9. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MNDad View Post
    Personally, I think there needs to be much more rigor in how well and how objectively kids on medications are evaluated. When I was practicing, I'd see people on these meds, and have no way of evaluating in an objective fashion whether they should be continued, because nothing was being tracked. We have to do a better job of making the benefits of these medications measurable in some way so that we can do a better job of assessing the tradeoffs (in terms of adverse effects; and there are always tradeoffs.)
    I've always been curious how kids who are misdiagnosed are benefiting from medications. Is it really helping them? I think people have misconceptions about how the medications affect kids--they're not turned into catatonic, submissive zombies. My son is chatty, active, and happy when he's on his meds (my only experience is with stimulants). He's also calmer and able to follow directions better. I wonder if stimulant meds have the same effect on someone who doesn't really have ADHD.

    My son's pediatrician sits down with us a couple of times a year to discuss dosage and managing side effects (weight loss, difficulty sleeping, etc.). She really relies on my observations, so I'm not sure if that is what you would call a rigorous or objective system for making decisions about medications.
    Mother of two monkeys...daughter age 10 and son age 11.5.

  10. #9

    Default

    I may have a somewhat skewed view because the cases I consulted on were usually young adults where I could simply not tell whether stimulant meds were helping, harming, neither, or both.

    It sounds like you have a great pediatrician.
    DD age 9, Grade 4ish

    Eclectic. We do music, math English, history/geography/culture, Russian and science. Lots and lots of reading. I blog at suzukiexperience.com

    WARNING: Unwittingly, I may occasionally say things to which you take offence.

  11. #10

    Default

    I read something recently that said that kids without ADHD actually did do better on standardized tests (so take THAT for whatever it's worth) than unmedicated peers because it did improve memory, focus, etc. for much the same reason that some folks who take meth and other illegal stimulants find that focus and attention improve while the drugs are in their system. They do work for most everyone; some people simply need them to function. I wish I could remember where I read that; I think it was in a book, but don't hold me to it. I'll see if I can recall and find a link.

    Anyway, I agree with AMM about what it does to a truly ADHD child. Right now my son is downstairs fixing lunch for me, his sister, and himself. He's delighted to be able to help. If he forgets his meds for a day or two, he would be running amok and lunch - especially for anyone else - would be the furthest thing from his mind. I keep hoping - truly do - that they can figure out a neurological exam or some objective way to diagnose ADHD and/or figure out a root cause. That was one of the reasons I had genetic testing done for DS a month or so ago - I was hoping to find a cause for his ASD, ADHD and other issues. Frustratingly (but positively?) the panel came back clear. But I keep hoping, because I would have DS in there in a heartbeat.
    ---
    Sarah B., Oklahoma

    "By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the bitterest." - Confucius

    Blog: Our Sunnyview

    Less-than-Zenlike mother of:
    M1 - The Boy, age 11, home since 2009 - loves science, swimming, and folk music
    M2 - The Girl, age 9, home since 2012 - loves anatomy, the arts, and her violin

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
'ADHD Does Not Exist' by Richard Saul