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  1. #31
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    Sorry, folks, I have yet to figure out how to quote multiple comments in one reply!

    I think it's interesting that our collective thoughts here have kind of reproduced the whole debate about ADHD:

    1. Yes, the problems are real, and some people/kids really benefit from the meds.

    2. Lots of kids likely just need adults to have more tolerance for kid behavior and probably changes in the way kids live and are raised are the real problem for many diagnosed kids: Less active, outdoor, unstructured time; more 'academics' in school, etc.
    (This is a big problem, without an easy answer - I'd love to send my DS outside to play all day, but there's no pack of kids for him to run around with! My kid was in Kinder and only had 1 outside recess time in a 7 hour day. And the teach wanted to take that away as a discipline tool. Put a stop to that quick, but still. When I went to elementary we had 2 recesses a day through 6th grade. And 3 a day 3 times a week through 4th. Also, the playground area was huge - play equipment, basketball court, tether balls, a big hill and treed area to chase around and run up and down, etc. Not just a small little plastic play area.)

    3. Maybe there's more/other stuff going on that the label ADHD plus med and (sometimes) behavioral therapy/school accommodations isn't addressing and parents/docs should first go down a list of other possible causes for the signs/symptoms that are troublesome.

    But while all this is important, and clearly the world for kids would be a better place if we were the ones in charge, I'm still hoping for more better answers to: 1. why the increase (still) in "real" ADHD-Autism-like-SPD-type kids/problems? 2. what if you go down Saul's list and are still left with ADHD - type behaviors that are unexplained?

    Oh well. Off to go have fun with my little bouncy boy. And feeling extra grateful today that we can arrange our lives to save him from school.
    Last edited by pdpele; 04-17-2014 at 10:45 AM.

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  3. #32
    Senior Member Evolved BakedAk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdpele View Post
    But it is hard to not look for something that explains it all and (hopefully) promises more effective treatment/strategies.
    This is exactly true. I want there to be a pill to fix whatever the problem is. (Actually, Valium for DH might do the trick...)

    For those people with a genuine medical need for some kind of treatment (anxiety, depression, AD/HD, whatever), if my experience is any indication, it's a lot harder to get help that is not pharmaceutical. Insurance is not as generous for counseling (at least my insurance) as it is for medication. Alternative or natural therapies are hardly covered at all. Yes, I'd like to learn "effective strategies for dealing with problematic behaviors" (my own included), but when do I do that? Doctors offices are rarely set up with waiting areas designed for young homeschool kids, and office staff should not have to be babysitters. As an older, secular homeschooling mom, living thousands of miles from family, I am isolated enough that arranging childcare for clinical visits is difficult. None of this is to say that medication for Boy or myself is the answer, but if the problem is a lack of focus or "executive skills" like working memory, organization, task initiation and goal directed persistence, staying on task long enough to research and try out multiple possible solutions is about as likely as me actually having all the dishes and all the laundry done at one time (or anyone reading to the end of this awfully long sentence and rambling post!).
    Melissa

    Mommy to Girl-13 and Boy-11, trying to keep my head above water with farm, school, home and art.

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  4. #33
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    Absolutely the lack of insurance coverage for non pharm treatments is a huge issue. We are paying about 800/month for therapies to treat ADHD/anxiety for one kiddo right now, but the neuro feedback is not designed to be a life long therapy and should be done within the year. Not many people are fortunate to have extra money to pay for therapies out of pocket, and even with our decent income it is a stretch for us. The thing is some parents are wiling to shell out that kind of cash for braces but won't consider it for therapy. I think the brain is more important than teeth.

  5. #34
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    Dr. Seuss! I'll have to check that one out.

  6. #35

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    I think Melissa nailed another good point, that our society is extremely harsh on anything outside of a very, very narrow spectrum of 'normal.' Cases of ADHD, autism, etc. are on the rise not only because of a system that is better able to recognize them but also because of a system that wants to put everyone into a very narrow chute. It's all very Gattaca sometimes. I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to take DS in to a facility that uses alternative therapies. But it's horrendously expensive, and insurance for it? Not happening. So I buy the books and try to do the therapies at home the best I can, but sometimes there's just no way to work around what needs to happen vs. what can. My goal - fingers and toes crossed - is that one day DS will be able to cope without medication. It's a vague, fuzzy, weak hope, but it's a hope. One day he'll develop some executive function skills of his own, right?? *le sigh*

    There's another school of thought out there that has to do with epigenetics and the potential that those have for causing the rise in ADHD/ASD cases, but I'll let someone more educated speak on that. I only know the very vaguest of details and understand it only in the most layman-like terms.
    ---
    Sarah B., Oklahoma

    "By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the bitterest." - Confucius

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  7. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsLOLcat View Post
    I read something recently that said that kids without ADHD actually did do better on standardized tests (so take THAT for whatever it's worth) than unmedicated peers because it did improve memory, focus, etc. for much the same reason that some folks who take meth and other illegal stimulants find that focus and attention improve while the drugs are in their system. They do work for most everyone; some people simply need them to function. I wish I could remember where I read that; I think it was in a book, but don't hold me to it. I'll see if I can recall and find a link.
    I read an article last year (One of the tv stations ran a piece on it to) where lower income schools were encouraging parents to get their kids on adhd meds to up the test numbers. Some of the parents were basically saying, "We're low income. The only way this kid is going to get into college is with good grades and this accomplishes that."
    Tamarin - 7, Lemur - 6, Howler - 4, and Capuchin - 1.

    Six Monkeys in the Country, my blog about homeschooling, farm life, raising young children and my ridiculous opinions.

  8. #37
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    I also do not believe ADHD exists, except as an excuse for Big Pharma to make money.

  9. #38

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    My son was diagnosed with ADHD. At the same time as his diagnosis, he also started vision therapy because he couldn't get his eyes to focus on the same letter and he was seeing in double vision. If he moved, he saw one of things...so he moved....a LOT.

    The vision therapy helped his reading immensely. The strange thing was that it also helped a lot of his sensory seeking behaviors and his movement. He could see...so he didn't need to move. He also didn't need to touch everyone and everything, didn't need to put everything in his mouth, didn't need to spin for an hour on the swing.

    But...he still gets distracted. We deal with it. He is much more ADD now than ADHD. He does white noise generators and things like that to help him keep focused. He just can NOT NOT attend to everything that his happening around him. Last year he was in a room with other kids and couldn't do the work when the teacher was working with the other kids...he HAD to listen in. He finally asked the teacher if he could work in the hall. The teacher thought that was a horrible thing, but agreed. I thought it was a great thing that my son recognized that was what he needed. That was when we started the white noise.

    And I totally explain to people that because one sense was out of whack that it effected the others and his movement. I totally get how that can happen with other kids too. Time needs to be spent trying to find those other things. The doctor who diagnosed my son with ADHD did not "believe in" vision therapy....but it made a huge difference for him.

    At some point, my son may need meds, but he will need to go through the diagnosis process again. ADHD is real, but yes, other causes DO need to be ruled out too. The doctor who diagnosed my son needs to believe in other causes of symptoms just as much as he believes in ADHD though too.

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