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  1. #21

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    As far as interesting thoughts on ADHD I enjoyed reading Thom Harmann's book "The Edison Gene" I'm not sure how much of it I really believe, but it helped me embrace the idea of different-not-deficient when trying to work with some behaviors that I found frustrating.
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  3. #22

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    My sister and stepmom have it, it is real. My sister needs her medicine, but it is hard on her body. She is always going to the doctor to check her weight and other things. That said whenever they suggest my boy needs it, I don't see it. He can focus on something like a dog with bone if it interests him. If it does not interest him, then we pretty much move on. I consider this pretty normal. I do not want to sit and labor over something I hate. I get it done and move on quickly. Yes he is active, runs around, fidgets, likes to stand up to do his work, but he will also sit down when he needs to. I do not seem the same behavoris in my son as my sister had when she was his age. My stepmom told me she used to have problems sleeping because her brain would not shut off, so she would get up and clean her room, draw, or some other activity to try and stop her brain from going. There was no ADD/ADHD back then.
    My half brother does not have it, my son is probably closest in behavoir to him. He is the navy right now and is thriving. He began to calm his energy level down around middle and high school because of sports. I guess my point is that I am one of the believers it is over diagnosed by teachers and parents who don't want to deal with certain "normal" behaviours. There are doctors out there who do not do good exams and just take the parents or schools word for it because they don't see the child outside of the office. There are probably many who would not even know the right questions to ask to do a good exam.
    I would love to see more info on how the medicines work in kids who do not have it. I read an article recently on flip board about the over "drugging" of our boys for the sake of standardized testing. It was more of an opinion thing and did not have any hard facts in it other than number of kids prescribed these meds. it presented the drugs as mind-altering and dangerous, of course that is what the writer wanted you believe. They claimed they were/are destroying out kids minds and hurting them. While I am not familiar with the meds in question, other than what my sister takes, I wondered about the accuracy of his statement.
    I do not believe in giving meds that are not needed to my boy but I do believe there are people who need them. I would be interested to see some studies on the long term use of these drugs and if they really do have some dangerous side effects. It would be a good way for parents to be able to make more informed choices.

  4. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdpele View Post
    MrsLOLCat - that is really interesting that your DS' genetic panel thing came back 'clear'...
    To be fair, we weren't testing specifically for something for ADHD. What we were testing for had more to do with his ASD symptoms and/or familial issues (Marfan's), BUT those things could have affected his attention and caused other issues. I was just oddly hoping to have found a definitive answer and therefore a potential treatment. I'm really GLAD he doesn't have Marfan's or any of the other issues we were looking for, but it's kind of frustrating, too. The geneticist wants us to come back and see about more testing for some polydactyly syndromes, because some of those may be relevant, but I'm kind of waiting on the bill for this test to come in before we go back :/
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  5. #24

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    And yes, the drugs usually prescribed for ADD and ADHD help anyone who takes them to focus. College students found this out and have been using them to help study for finals. In that way, they are similar (IMO) to anabolic steroids. These steroids can help anyone gain muscle mass; you don't have to have a need/disorder for them to work. So what I'm saying is that just because they have what is considered a positive effect, that doesn't mean they were necessary in the first place.

  6. #25

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    Yeah... I really wonder how negative the long term effects of many of these drugs are and to what extent they're making it harder for people to develop needed coping strategies without them. I also have to admit that while, again, I think a few people need the meds, I don't really trust the self reporting of who needs it because nearly everyone will say they do. Statistically speaking, I don't really believe that.
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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AddlepatedMonkeyMama View Post
    Do you have my kid, pdpele?
    I think so! And here I thought my DS was one of a kind.

    Quote Originally Posted by AddlepatedMonkeyMama View Post
    I'd almost rather deal with the individual behaviors/issues and not worry about what to call them all together.
    I think this is a better way to go about it, too. But it is hard to not look for something that explains it all and (hopefully) promises more effective treatment/strategies.

    I think Saul's book leads to thinking more like this. And that's the point, maybe, of setting aside the ADHD label in favor of looking for more precise causes for issues.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsLOLcat View Post
    What we were testing for had more to do with his ASD symptoms and/or familial issues (Marfan's), BUT those things could have affected his attention and caused other issues. I was just oddly hoping to have found a definitive answer and therefore a potential treatment. I'm really GLAD he doesn't have Marfan's or any of the other issues we were looking for, but it's kind of frustrating, too.
    Not an odd hope! But, yeah, glad you were able to rule out other not fun stuff, too.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnonyMs View Post
    New Attention Disorder Spurs Research, Debate. It is impossible to trust pharmacriminals. Your kid doesn't have ADHD? Then, step right up for a 'sluggish cognitive tempo' diagnosis! Anybody else reminded of Sylvester McMonkey McBean?
    Saw this a short time ago, and I guess I glazed over it with a sigh...Who is Sylvester McBean?

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicgirl View Post
    I have two kids, and both have been diagnosed with ADHD. One has also been identified with AS/ASD, giftedness, sensory-processing disorder, and anxiety disorder-nos (all except the giftedness likely due to brain trauma secondary to an underlying medical condition). She needs meds. If you met her when she was just getting up and ready for breakfast, before medicine, and then again 3 hours later you'd be shocked to be told that you'd just met the same girl twice. Barely functional vs. bright, curious and engaged. I have no question that she needs the medicine she takes, and that it greatly improves her quality of life.

    My son, on the other hand, only received his diagnosis because I consulted my daughter's therapist after multiple reports about his school behavior and lack of focus. He is of the classically over-diagnosed population: bright, energetic, male, 6. He's also a predominantly visual-spatial learner. I refused to give him medication because helping him learn some behavioral control, and changing his learning environment was all we needed to improve his access to grade level material (well, above grade level material outside of his old classroom) and let him make friends and feel socially competent.

    My thoughts on the situation outlined in the article are:
    (1) Just because it's over-diagnosed doesn't mean it's not a real disorder
    (2) Our public education system that caters primarily to a single style of learning, and most highly values quiet, calm, compliant learners, created the culture of over-diagnosis for which parents take the blame. When my son was in school the teacher, principal and other parents from the class all pressured me (and 2 other families of young boys) to "do something" and "talk to his doctor". The message was clear: A good parent, and a good member of that community would medicate my son and the other boys.
    Wow, Atomicgirl, this and other people's stories of kids that only run into issues when sent to school make me so sad. I mean, even the ADHD checklist (which Saul and other people complain about being way too broad and vague) says that the "dysfunction" should be happening in at least two major life areas - like school and home. I mean, here you are homeschooling in part due to this (I'm assuming), but how many others can't/don't and end up starting on meds? Well - I guess most - given the explosion in meds that we are all talking about...

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by murphs_mom View Post
    After my mother's stroke, she was having a hard time speaking without slurring her words (think 'incredibly drunk' sounding individual), and her doctor prescribed Ritalin. We all pshawed it and laughed, but after just a couple of days of being on the Ritalin and then adjusting her dosage down (she was having trouble w/sleep) it was amazing how clear her speech was and how alert she was. It's been 2yr since the stroke, and I can tell 95% of the time when she's either too tired or missed her Ritalin. She sounds slurry and groggy. She has never had ADD/ADHD or anything close to it, so the Ritalin may be primarily affecting the parts of her brain that were affected by the stroke? IDK for sure. The clot was in the base of the basal ganglia, and they were able to remove most of it, but a tiny part couldn't be reached. Just based on personal observation, the Ritalin seems to be speeding up my mother's processing which leads to clarity.
    Wow, that's interesting...glad your mom made it through the stroke...

    Quote Originally Posted by murphs_mom View Post
    When I pointed out to the evaluator that my Kindergarten teacher noted on my report card 400yr ago that I had a hard time sitting still and focusing but that I was able to self-correct by the end of the year, the evaluator tried to pin an ADHD label on me. DH thought that was hysterical.
    Goodness sakes.

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'ADHD Does Not Exist' by Richard Saul