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  1. #1
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Default Please recommend early readers and CVC books.

    Are there any interesting early readers out there with mainly cvc words?

    DS4 basically cruised through the Bob lvl 1 and HOP k-1, the first package. He's really interested in reading the books, not so much the workbook lists. I'd like him to have some more easy practice, but if he reads one of these little guys more than once he has the whole thing memorized. He's motivated to read, but I don't want to go too fast. I don't want him to get frustrated.

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  3. #2

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    *Interesting* and early readers? Boy you want it all!

    I just cleaned out DS9's Kindergarten box - it had the rest of the Bob series (I think to 4), then the frog n toad / Mouse soup stories. Im remembering now we also revisited some of the earliest picture books - Red Fish, Blue Fish and Go Dog Go types. And the easier Dr Seuss books.
    The early readers also have number ratings on the back of them - Level 1, 2, or 3 based on difficulty.

    I know what you mean about memorizing the Bob books, though. And they arent the most interesting stories in the world. There is a Bob app, where the stories and reading levels cycle through in a game fashion. I think its not frustration inducing, as my non-talking, never went through the alphabet, 3yr old can complete the free version on his own.

    Speaking of whom, his OT recommended a couple of letter-drawing and recognizing apps for us that we have had lots of fun with. Letter School lets you pick which style you want to learn to draw letters (HWT, Z-Something, or some other one), and guides and lets you do it with your finger. DS3 loves it for the animated trains and rockets that follow the paths the letters take.
    The other is Letter Quiz, and it has letter identification games as well as sequential steps for making the letters - and it shows the actual lines your kid makes.
    (We are using these for fine motor skills, couldnt care less about letter recognition at this time - but DS3 absolutely loves the apps. Which is good, because many more Thomas apps and I will kill myself.)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3

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    Go Dog Go was a good one, interesting but repetitive. Also if he is into any disney stuff or Thomas, they have a lot of early readers with those. The library should have a good selection of early readers so you can see what will work. We usually went a bit harder, but then when he said can you read now Mom, I would take over to decrease frustration.
    Beth
    DS16 with ASD, DD12 and DS10

  5. #4
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Thanks, alexsmom! I'll check out the apps and the Suess books tomorrow at the library. He has memorized all three Frog and Toad, but we can do Mouse Soup! I think I even have that one boxed up somewhere. I know the easy readers are mostly mind numbingly boring. I was hoping for a miracle...

    It seems we are in the opposite situation. My DS has horrible fine motor, lol. Like he's still fisting his crayons. I told him to hold it like a T-Rex last week; we'll see if that takes. And omg scissors! He might as well be using a hoof. But he'll tear a book out of my hands and demand to read it himself. He's memorized almost every book we own.

    Thanks, HawaiiHS! Yeah I will def check out the Disney readers, then. He loves Mickey. Thankfully we have finished with Thomas. We'd read them and my DH would always remark how many derailments there are! Haha. Personally, I never thought id want to smack a train, but those diesels are downright naughty ��
    Last edited by TFZ; 04-08-2015 at 09:04 PM.

  6. #5

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    It's been a little while for me. The Dr. Seuss books are intended to be read BY the child, not TO the child.....those are fun and silly. I'll double Mouse Soup, Frog and Toad, Little Bear. We loved Nate the Great too, but that might be just a little too much already?
    Like I said been a while, but hope it helps.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  7. #6

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    LOL our fine motor skills are why we work on them. Our therapists say it will help him with his speech too. Some days I feel I have an OT office here at the house.

    Our OT suggested breaking regular sized Crayolas to *force* a pincer grip instead of the whole hand grip. We also do a lot of tongs, chopsticks, and tweezers work. Somewhere on the web is an OT Mom blog with lots of Fine Motor Skills suggestions. Maybe you would find it helpful.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Aw I forgot about Little Bear! Adding to my list, mudlilly! Thanks!

    Alexsmom is it mamaot or ot-mom? Doesn't matter, I'll subscribe to both! More blogs! I'm obsessed!

  9. #8

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    Maybe Dr Seuss?
    Robin,
    working-at-home mother of two.
    homeschooling the 11yo boy.
    the girl is 14 (8th grade) and loves her public school.
    they are very very different kids.

  10. #9

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    Usborne has some phonic readers- Ted and Friends is a combined volume, and they have another combined volume w/ a cow on the front of it. My boys liked Stone Arch Readers, they have serveral series about trucks, trains, and some about a Lizard named Larry? Just go to AMazon and type in Stone Arch Reader and some will pop up. Look to see what your library has. Mine has some w/ rockets the spine, that are leveled, on them most animals, which my boys have also loved! We still get some from the library most week, though they have already read them. My library has an entire wall of leveled readers, and while it does take some time to go through each one, you can probably find some series in there that are the right level.

    ALso, there are books/stories on starfall.com
    Mom to 5 great kids~

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    Awesome! Thanks

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Please recommend early readers and CVC books.