Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4
Results 31 to 38 of 38
  1. #31

    Default

    I know this is an old thread - but like other posters recommended, my son absolutely loved the Frog and Toad books and Henry and Mudge.

    For non-fiction, have you tried the "We Both Read" books? I don't know if they are still around, but they were great little non-fiction books that my son enjoyed. The parent reads one page and the child reads the next page that is written at a lower reading level. The books had great photos and were interesting to my son. I'm not sure if they've changed over the years; my son used them in first grade when he was in school. I think most of the books we read were about animals, insects and ecosystems.
    finished 8th grade (our fifth year homeschooling)
    Dumplett (girl - age 14) and Wombat (boy - age 14)

  2. T4L In Forum Sept19
  3. #32

    Default

    My DS1 is at a similar reading level, so I'm really interested in all your recommendations. I ordered a truckload of books the other day (mainly early readers), so I'll see if there are any I can add to the list when they arrive and we get the chance to use them.
    I was wondering about your opinion of boxed sets of phonics readers in general. Have you found these useful in the past? Or would you avoid them in favor of regular picture books for early readers? Thanks!

  4. #33
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,609
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    We read a ton of library books. DS picked out all different kinds from National Geographic easy readers to Dr. Seuss. We bought some of his favorites, but there are so many that he'd just read once and never again. If you're buying, I'd stick to picture books or the series that you'd both love to read over and over. I regret some of my first purchases - the Marley books I bought which he ended up hating, a set of Ameila Bedelia that he just couldn't get into, ugh and a big set of Dick and Jane that was a gift I should have returned. We have a bazillion picture books and stories, though. All different kinds. Those are more enjoyable to go back to.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  5. #34

    Default

    I have done the same thing as TFZ, purchase a few books that DS did not like. He did not like Dr. Seuss. Who would have thought! After I invested in books that did not work, I have moved to another system.

    What I have done is try the books out from the library and if DS really likes the series, then I will buy others that the library doesn't have. Or for series that I would like to try out, I would purchase one of them, if DS keeps asking for more then I will add to it.

    I have piles of barely touched books.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

  6. #35

    Default

    How I wish we had easy access to a library with English books!
    It's definitely in the top 10 of things I miss here in Japan.

    It's so hit and miss with kids. I'm often surprised by the lack of interest in something I'm sure they'll like, or vice versa.

  7. #36
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,609
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Oh yeah that is a rough one. Maybe preview some on Amazon to see if it sparks their interest first?
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  8. #37

    Default

    Or preview / read them as e-books. Im amazed at all the picture books the libraries have in eformat.
    A big library with a pay-for membership (seem to be about $50/year) that has a large selection of kids and young reader books might be worthwhile. If I remember rightly, Philadelphia Free Library, Houston Library, and St Louis all have huge collections of around 100k books. Or if you have friends in the States, that dont mind sharing their library card with you (you cant accumulate overdue fees or anything). (New York City, Los Angeles, and San Francisco have free cards to residents... and huge collections.)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #38

    Default

    Some beginner readers that my daughter liked were ones by Andy Griffiths. If you can stand his humor, I know not everyone can, you can get some of them as e-books through the apple store - 'Frog on a Log in a Bog', 'Duck in a Truck in the Muck'. We also had 'Ed, and Ted, and Ted's Dog Fred', and 'The Cat, The Mat, The Rat, and The Baseball Bat'. I think all of four of the above books may be in 'The Cat on The Mat is Flat', which is available as an e-book.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us

SecularHomeschool.com was created to provide information, resources, and a place to share and connect with secular homeschoolers across the world. Secularhomeschool.com aims to be your one-stop shop for all things homeschool! We will be highlighting information about wonderful secular homeschool resources, and keeping you up to date with what is going on in the world of secular homeschooling. But that is only the beginning. SHS is your playground. A place to share the things that are important to you. A place to create and join groups that share your interests. A place to give and get advice. There are no limits to what you can do at Secular Homeschool, so join today and help build the community you have always wanted.

SecularHomeschool.com is a community and information source where secular homeschoolers ARE the majority. It is the home for non-religious homeschoolers, eclectic homeschoolers, freethinking homeschoolers AND anyone interested in homeschooling irrespective of religion. This site is an INCLUSIVE community that recognizes that homeschoolers choose secular homeschool materials and resources for a variety of reasons and to accomplish a variety of personal and educational goals. Although SecularHomeschool.com, and its members, have worked hard to compile a comprehensive directory of secular curricula, it does not attest that all materials advertised on our site, in our newsletters, or on our social media profiles are 100% secular. Rather, SecularHomeschool.com respects the aptitude of each individual homeschool parent to fully research any curriculum before acquiring it, to ensure that it holistically meets the educational, personal, and philosophical goals of each homeschooler.

Join us
Please recommend early readers and CVC books.