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  1. #11

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    Dont forget to take the stuff out of the middle!

    (Do they still come that way? With a packet of innards some people eat?)
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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  3. #12
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    OH NO! Like a turkey?!? I can never find that bag!
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  4. #13

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    No, AM, generally they don't come that way. You're definitely thinking turkey! LOL!!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  5. #14

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    LOL shows what I know! I thought I remember my grama pulling out livers and neckbones and gibblets?

    And Ive gone to vegas for thanksgiving for at least 8 years now. I dunno what comes inside a frozen turkey.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  6. #15

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    Yeah, they stopped doing that with processed chickens in the late 70's/early 80's. Your grandma memory makes sense
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  7. #16

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    You can use the bones to make your own chicken broth. If you slow cook it by itself, save all the nice juices as those make a pretty good broth as well. :-)

  8. #17

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    Where I am at the giblet bag is still in the chicken! Here is how we do chicken in our house, slow cook it, in a crock pot. TONS of seasonings. I serve the chicken whole at dinner with potatoes and a fresh veggie. Take all the meat that you can off the bone. Take the bones and crack them, (may need to use a pair of scissors (I've been known to hit it with the meat tenderizer, I love the look on my kids faces when I do that!) put that in the crock with a little baking soda and fresh veggies (onion, celery, carrots and garlic coves) and more seasonings like a bay leaf or so and whatever you like. Cover with water and let simmer for hours. The baking soda will help pull out the minerals in the bones and the marrow from the broken ones will add a very rich flavor to it. Then you have bone stock to make whatever you want with it! My family loves it and it will freeze fine in a container. Oh and put those giblets back in with the broth! More meat in there more flavor!!
    (I am sorry if I was too graphic in nature for anyone out there!!)

  9. #18
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Lol there were giblets. They were sticking out, though, so easier to find than in the turkey - couldn't even figure out which end. I probably under seasoned it, but I'm seasoning shy. Stuffed a onion up its - butt? neck? - and propped it up on foil balls with a cup of water at the bottom. I'm going to try to put the carcass back in overnight tonight with the giblies.

    My back up is tuna casserole. The chicken should be done at five, so I've got an hour or so to make something else if I need to.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  10. #19

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    Here's a hack for a perpetual supply of the best ready-to-use homemade chicken broth for soups: Cook salt-n-peppered (and any other seasonings you like) chicken pieces (bone in, skin on) on something like 365, in an open glass rectangular baking pan in the oven, regularly (when you also put glass lidded casseroles full of vegetables, rice or potatoes, and one full of apples or other fruit with or without dough, to bake at the same time, and pull it all out at the same time, it will be like Aunt Bea came to your house, only YOU did it! but that's an aside)....and when your chicken has nice crispy lightly browned skin, it's done.

    After everyone has enjoyed that dinner, pour that fat-coated liquid in the chicken-cooking pan into a glass mixing bowl or other glass, widemouthed container, and chill in the fridge. Next day, peel off the thick chunk of solid yellow-white fat from the top and either keep it refrigerately separately to grease pans, or else toss it, your choice. Under it will be chicken gelatin in a solid mass. Keep that in the fridge, or if you're not going to roast chicken again and make soup that week, freeze it.

    Do that again whenever you oven-roast chicken (pour off the juices after, chill, pick off the fat slab, and chill or freeze the jello part) until you have enough aspic (the chicken gelatine) volume to make up the amount of soup you want.

    At the point that you're ready to make soup, collect all the leftover veggies from the fridge, whether they are casserole dishes of leftover vegetables from that time you filled the oven with baking dishes and everyone felt like it was dinner with Aunt Bea, or whether they are wilted specimens from a not-quite-finished veggie tray, or if you have no leftover veggies, you can chop some fresh ones up, and dump it all on top of the aspic in the soup pot, along with whatever leftover chicken and other meats and bones you may have in the fridge, and any leftover cooked potatoes, rice, or noodles, if desired.
    Add onions, garlic, parsley, kale, or whatever you like, if you want to. Add some water to cover if the aspic isn't enough to cover what all you've put in, but make sure you have at least as much aspic, as water, or it will taste thin and too vegetal and not brothy enough.

    Lid, turn on medium, wait for good smells. When it smells good, turn down the heat, stir down, taste, and adjust seasoning if needed. Then it can slowly simmer away until you're ready for dinner!

    I usually make soup weekly (more often in winter, when I also do a lot of that "fill up the oven" type of cooking and thus have lots of aspic reserved) and that's my chance to clean out the fridge and pull out all the leftover cooked veggies, wilting fresh veggies, and leftover bits of meat and bones, and dump it all into the pot with that precious aspic.

    We have almost zero waste this way, and turn what would have been a fridge full of unappetizing leftovers into a fabulous pot of soup or stew and I never need to buy solid fats anymore, because I have a ready supply.

    Also, if the kids don't feel like eating what I served for dinner one day, that's okay...it can just become soup, and the soup is often better. No waste.
    Middle-aged mom of 4 kids spanning a 10-year age range, homeschooling since 2009, and a public school mom also, since 2017.

  11. #20

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    I am waaaaay lazier than cruchynerd, so I often throw an entire seasoned chicken into my large crock pot early in the morning, and let it cook for 10 hours on low. After dinner I let the crock cool down, then retrieve all the remaining meat, leaving the skin, bones, and fat in the crock. Then I add herbs, aromatic veggies, and a gallon of water. If the boys have any abandoned apples or pears, they get thrown in too. I let that cook on low for 12-16 hours, then let it cool and strain it into jars. I'll use half to make soup with the remaining meat, and half to cook beans and veggies in other dishes.
    FKA Hordemama
    Stay-at-home-librarian parenting a horde of two sons: Marauder 1 (M1) born in 2007, and Marauder 2 (M2) born in 2012.

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