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Thread: One Pot

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    Default One Pot

    Anyone use One Pot type recipes? I friggin hate cleaning up, and my crock pot is buried in the low cabinet appliance graveyard.

    I've made this twice now - without the cheese or red pepper flakes. It's too easy. Italian Wonderpot - Budget Bytes
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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    Oh hell yeah! That's Martha Stewart's "genius recipe" and it was how I made pasta last summer with my fresh tomatoes and basil. Here is the backstory on it plus 6 other recipes. Food52
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

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    Mmmmmm bolognese.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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    So can you take things out of the pot, cook another thing, put the first thing back into the pot or is that creating the One Bowl Too Many thing ?? The reason I ask is I make a stewed chicken dish where I have to brown the meat (thigh/leg/breast chunk, skin on, of one of our birds), remove the meat to deglaze the pan with wine or balsamic, add onions/oil/garlic back into pan to brown, then add chicken to cook completely with some carrots, maybe some salsa if I have it. I add couscous near the end to soak up all the cooking liquid, sometimes some frozen peas. It ends up being one-pot(ish).
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

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    That sounds good. I make Mac and cheese every week and that's just one pot and the strainer. But even sometimes that feels like too much, lol. Yeah I wish I could just throw the Mac in with some milk and then 30 min later BAM mac&cheese.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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    If you ever consider taking your slow cooker out again, 365 Slow Cooker Suppers by Stephanie O'Dea actually makes me not hate slow cooker food. She is all about dump and go.
    Rebecca
    DS 14, DD 12
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    All of my one pot recipes are crock-pot ones. Though now that it is summer, the idea of cooking anything inside the house is too much. DH gets to BBQ once a week with the meat for the week and I will add it to salads.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

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    I bought this in ebook form:
    One Pot: 120+ Easy Meals from Your Skillet, Slow Cooker, Stockpot, and More: Editors of Martha Stewart Living: 8601410690571: Amazon.com: Books

    I was dubious at first because I thought Martha Stewart would mean overly fussy and pretentious, but in this case, at least, it wasnt.

    I was ebrowsing a Weight Watchers one pot cookbook this morning, and it seemed to have some tempting recipes too. (I dont care about weight watcher points, just was looking for healthier stuff.)
    So check overdrive, too.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

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    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

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    If you are interested in One Pot meals because of more than just the clean up issue (for example, speed of getting a meal together, no hassle cooking, etc) and you don't mind using a pressure cooker, I've had some luck adapting crock pot meals (like those by Stephanie O'Dea) to pressure cooker meals. It's a personal choice whether you like slow cookers or pressure cookers better (I don't like smelling dinner cooking all day) and the prep schedule is different (slow cooker at night or early morning, pressure cooker in afternoon before dinner although I also sometimes prep the night before if I can fit the prepped food into my fridge), but it might be worth considering. If you get an electric pressure cooker (something I swore I would never do until finally I gave in and got one last Thanksgiving) you can throw everything in, set it, go do other things, and never even turn on the stove. I carry it (very carefully) outside to vent if I am doing a quick release, so I don't even have the steam in the house. After wondering what the fuss was about electric pressure cookers for so long, now I completely understand why people love them - provided you don't mind the types of food you can produce in them (we do a lot with beans, vegetables, rice, pasta, only a little meat) they can really simplify your life. Many of the models sold today allow you to sear, simmer, etc in the pot (similar to the crockpot that Stephanie O'Dea recommends) so you can do more than pressure cook in it. You can even make one pot mac n cheese (you do have to stir in milk and cheese at end, but no straining). Instant Pot users have a facebook page where they post tons and tons of recipes if you wanted to see what people do with their pressure cookers.

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    AM if you want that WW one pot book, get it now on B&N. It's $4 because it's the old points system. They're rereleasing all the books with the new points a few at a time.

    I really should pull out the crockpot. I had it on the counter for a while and used it at least once a week. If it's out, I'll use it.

    Jill - I think the pressure cooker is beyond my skill level at this point. I have enough trouble trying to use a regular pot on the stove, lol. I've got a few go-tos now, but they're mostly kid food. We do love beans and rice here, though. I heart my rice cooker.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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