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Thread: One Pot

  1. #21

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    Yep! Everyone eats what they want. Kitchen stays cool too I have to add though, that my boys have always preferred raw veggies over cooked ones.

    Pickled eggs!!! My folks owned a bar when I was a kid. Always a jar of pickled eggs around, in fact, always several jars of different pickled "things" around. Haven't had one in a Looooong time.

    And you're not alone on being over peeling everyone's eggs. I was so happy when they began to peel their own.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

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  3. #22
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    Oh yeah I forgot they'll be able to do that one day. Hahahaha I wonder if DS would be able to? He does oranges. I got the bag of pickleds when I was pregnant because I was craving hb eggs, but they were so small. I ate the dozen in two days. Just kept opening the fridge and popping.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  4. #23

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    My boys love deviled eggs, and DS4 peels 'em as part of his *fine motor skills* work. He loves peeling the eggs, and sometimes is better than others. Sometimes he tears the eggs, sometimes he gouges them...

    But yah, let your DS have a go at them!

    Salads in the house, though? Only kind that even gets tasted is chicken salad.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  5. #24

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    I put it out salad bar style....pick and choose....it's like heaven for my youngest

    Oh Deviled Eggs.....how I love thee....but boy do you make me gassy!! LOL!!!
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  6. #25

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    Oh my, you all are talking about such good sounding salads! If only I could convince my partner that salad or soup can actually be dinner, not just something you eat to hold you over until the "real" food shows up!

    TFZ, will your family eat leftovers? Or leftovers creatively rearranged into something less leftover-y looking? My partner's mom basically followed the rule that if it wasn't eaten at dinner, it got chucked (I've seen her throw away whole leftover baked potatoes, salad, pasta, etc, at the end of a meal) so I had to work a while to convince him that leftovers actually were good things, but now we typically have at least one or 2 meals a week based solely off of leftovers. It doesn't really solve the one pot issue, but at least you'd get several nights out of cooking one meal.

    As another suggestion (please ignore if it doesn't help you!) along kind of a leftover-y vein, what about cooking up a large amount of a number of basic components of meals (for example, chicken, pork, beef, several varieties of beans seasoned in various ways) whenever you get a free minute and then portioning it out and freezing them so that they were easy to pull out when needed? I'm not sure how old your kids are, and I did have some troubles pulling this off with a newborn (mine are now 5, almost 3, and 1.5ish), but I've turned to this method to try to address my inability to cook more than one thing at once. As you noted, TFZ, doing more than one thing at a time typically doesn't work so well for me either! As a disclaimer, this method works for several meals a week, but then I do need to do something else to keep people happy for a night or two, but I make enough for leftovers those other nights so even those more involved nights pay it forward on a later night.

    When I realize my freezer supply is running low, I try to find time to replenish it. Since I'm not planning on eating whatever it is I'm cooking at exactly that time, I can cook the food whenever I have free time, no matter what time of day it is. So, for example, if your family likes chicken - buy a decent amount of it and chuck it in the crockpot to cook. If you want to get fancy, throw in a bottle of barbecue sauce or some other seasoning. Same for beans - another day when you have some free time throw them in the crockpot and let the crockpot do its thing. Don't worry about lining up the cooking with a meal time; just make sure you have some time once it is cooked to package it up in a serving size that fits your needs and then either refrigerate or freeze it.

    When it's time for dinner, decide a little in advance what type of base you want (for example, rice, pasta, potatoes, lettuce, etc). We eat probably way too much brown rice (esp with the arsenic concerns) simply because it is so easy to throw it in the rice cooker and forget about it. While the base is cooking, pull out meat or beans and a veggie of your choice (I'm lazy and we typically do frozen veggies - no prep work - but if your kids don't like cooked then I guess you'd need to prep raw) and either reheat on stove or microwave your already cooked ingredients. Either let everybody assemble a plate or bowl with the items they want, or mix everything together into a rice or pasta or what have you casserole of sorts. Add a sauce or seasoning of your choice (pasta sauce, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, ginger sauce, any one of the multiple pre-made sauces you can buy in the store), sprinkle some cheese or sour cream or chopped olives, etc, on top if the meal would taste good with it, and voila, you're done. Definitely not 5 star cuisine and likely not even 3 star cuisine, but it is food, you've got most of the major food groups represented, and you haven't had to do anything more that night than cook the base, maybe boil some frozen veggies (or steam or roast them) and thaw anything else you might need.
    Last edited by Jill_; 05-09-2016 at 12:25 AM.

  7. #26
    Senior Member Arrived ejsmom's Avatar
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    We live on crock pot and salads here. DH makes a fantastic Cobb salad. I try to pre chop raw veggies once or twice a week so I can make salads quickly and easily. I usually have leftover roast chicken and season it different ways to add to salads. I try to eat at least one meal as a large salad every day. And almost always have one with dinner. DS will eat a salad, but he drowns it in dressing. Hard boiled eggs are great snacks. We cook up at least a dozen or 2, every week (for 3 of us.) I love deviled eggs (with horseradish added to the yolk filling), but they are such a PITA to make, so I rarely do.

    We buy our meat direct from the farm in CSA shares, so I get a ton of roasts, which do better in the crock pot and I love having leftover broth for soup base. I always brown the meat really good stove top first, though, and deglaze the pan to get that good stuff, and dump it in the crock pot. In the fall I like to do pork roasts with apples, onions, and sweet potatoes, bourbon to deglaze the pan, veggie broth, basil, garlic, smoked salt, and cinnamon.

    I get tired of cooking 3 meals a day from scratch, day after day. So I like to do everything in the slow cooker early in the day, and then just do smoothies for breakfast and a salad for lunch and dinner is essentially ready (maybe some rice or baked potatoes) - less cooking! DS now cooks most of his breakfasts. He likes a full meal - sausage (I make patties from ground turkey and freeze them), eggs, fruit, or sometimes he uses leftover mashed potatoes to make egg/potato cakes. We usually have leftover roasted veggies that he can crisp up in a frying pan and put an over easy egg on top.

    Leftover quiche is delicious and easy. Just slice and warm it up. If you are gluten-free use shredded potatoes for the crust. If not, crust is easy to make in big batches in the food processor and freeze ahead. Or use premade from the refrigerated grocery section. It's a cheap and easy way to use up whatever veg and meat you have leftover from anything else. Eggs, milk, cheese, and seasoning are things most people have on hand - and then ham and asparagus, chicken and tomato slices, bacon, onion, and peppers, crab and mushroom if you want to dial it up for guests - the options are endless. And quiche works for any meal - breakfast to dinner.
    homeschooling one DS, age 13.

  8. #27
    Senior Member Arrived TFZ's Avatar
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    We do pretty well with leftovers. DH is only home three nights a week on average. So there are lots of nights when one kid gets leftover Mac and cheese, one wants pbj, I eat a turkey sandwich, and the baby gets a bit of everything.

    Jill I love that idea of cooking extra meat. We get ground turkey a lot at Costco and only eat part of the little bag thing. Usually I just leave the rest raw, but I could cook it all and save it. Easy, thanks! Not too much freezer space, but I'll keep that in mind too.

    Ejsmom, I gotta get on the meal prep bandwagon and start prepping and portioning veggies, at least. We go through so much produce. There are days I'd eat a side salad, but I can't fathom getting all the stuff out and fixing it up for myself (and the kids to push around on their plates).

    I love deviled eggs. I can't figure out how to get the yolks in the middle. Mine are always way on one side. Last time I tried I ended up with half as many whites and a ton of yolk. Doesn't matter anyway. i won't be making them any time soon! Ha.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  9. #28

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    Poke a tiny hole (I use tip of steak knife) at the skinny end of your eggs before you boil them, and make sure there is enough water to cover them. The hole lets the gases escape, and you get beautifully centered egg yolks.
    if the hole is too big, a bit of the whites will stream out, which makes your water reminiscent of egg drop soup.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  10. #29

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    My go-to meal when my DD and I are home alone is scrambled eggs and toast, quick and easy! Also, I got one of those little veggie spiral cutters and I've been spiraling zucchini and sautéing it in olive oil with a bit of salt and pepper for 5 minutes and topping it off with spaghetti sauce and some Parmesan cheese. No waiting for the pasta to boil or straining, etc. Another quick and easy meal. Pick up some large baking potatoes and stuffings (bacon bits, broccoli, onions, cheese, etc.) have a baked potato night!
    May my heart be kind, my mind fierce, and my spirit brave. Learning at Home with Me
    Homeschooling DD (13)

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