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  1. #1
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    Default International Holiday Cuisine

    Anyone have a delicious international recipe for the holidays? We are very bland, traditional American cooks. I'd like to start introducing some new flavors and see if it sparks some interest in DS. He loves to "cook."

    I never really learned how to cook, but I swear I can follow a recipe. Apparently, I choose the absolute worst recipes from the Internet.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

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    Hmmm. Not sure if this is what you had in mind - its not holiday recipes, per se. But its international *lite*... and friendly for your DS4. (We used this book when DS was in K, learning about food from around the world. Emeril's There's a Chef in My World!: Recipes That Take You Places: Emeril Lagasse, Charles Yuen, Quentin Bacon: 9780060739263: Amazon.com: Books

    I like that it doesnt use any ingredients too exotic, and the flavors are softened.

    Are you looking for Hanukkah food? Matzah ball soup, and potato pancakes with apple sauce? That stuff English people eat for xmas? I have a Romanian friend who cooks a yummy sweet bread with dried fruits for xmas.

    Heres a list of Diwali recipes, but Id be pretty hesitant to try authentic ethnic food on kids. Diwali Recipes | Diwali Dinner Menu | Deepavali Dinner Menu Ideas ~ Indian Khana

    I think Chicken Mole is a popular mexican xmas dish, but I dont think its for novice chefs.

    Oh, that emeril book has a recipe for the thai coconut lime soup... tom kah gai. Mmmm.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  4. #3
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    Yum I love mole!
    I'm getting more and more suspicious of food bloggers, which is where I get most of my recipes. Oooooooo that picture looks yummy... Then, bummer. I donated all of our cookbooks to the library when I was prego with #2 on a huge nesting jag.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  5. #4

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    Tamales....xmas favorite for us!!! I have great memories of Grandma, Mom and Aunts making em and gossiping about everyone's personal business in Spanish, so the kids couldn't listen. To this day, I understand Spanish....but don't speak it very well.

    TFZ, can I piggy back on your question and specifically request Udon????? Udon is a fun, easy, kid-friendly choice.......don't know about the holiday aspect, though. And I don't mean Ramen
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  6. #5
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    Yes I would be interested in Udon, too. DS will basically eat anything noodle based.
    Yum tamales. How do you make them? Have a good recipe to share or link? DH would get into some Mexican holiday yumminess.
    I'm a work-at-home mom to three, homeschool enthusiast, and avid planner fueled by lattes and Florida sunshine. My oldest is 6 and is a fircond grader (that's somewhere between first and second, naturally), my preschooler just told me she wants to learn how to read, and my toddler is a force of nature.

    I gather all kinds of secular homeschool resources and share them at TheHomeschoolResourceRoom.com.

  7. #6

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    Tamale Recipe

    Grandma didn't use recipes, of course. But my mom and two aunts checked this online option for me and a few cousins and said, "Sure, give it a try...looks pretty close."

    I've followed it, and yeah, it's pretty spot on! I keep it bookmarked and make them twice a year. It makes a lot, and they freeze nicely Add some mole on top if you want.....mmmmmmm
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  8. #7

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    Those look sort of smaller than most Tamales Ive seen, ML. Not to go all Ron Jeremy on you. But. Do yours come out that thin? (Those look like theyre not more than an inch or so wide. Like taquitos, more than tamales.)

    Not judging, just asking.
    Homeschooling DS13, DS6.

    Atheist.

    My spelling was fine, then my brain left me.

  9. #8

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    Unless you get some huge ass corn husks....yeah, they are about 6 or so inches long and about 1 1/2 inch wide. Depends on the husks really, but you could fill them a bit more if your disapproving eyes are too accustomed to American restaurant portions. Lol!!

    Okay, so here's the thing.....it's a ratio thing. Meat to masa, when you're assembling. Most restaurants give you a big masa bomb.....stingy on the meat, kwim? Just like in the tutorial, I go easy on the masa. Remember it puffs a bit when being steamed. That's what I grew up with.
    Homeschooling two sons (14 and 16) from day one. Atheist.
    Eclectic, Slackschooler covering 8th and 10th grades this year.

  10. #9

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    LOVE tamales. We did some Diwali things last week because my kid finally can handle more spice. (It's a gradual thing, spice-introduction. I realize I have the highest tolerance for heat in my house and I am the cook so...too bad, tender tongues. Just kidding. You have to at least TRY a bite or two.)

    Back to Diwali: Basically I made a saag paneer and something pakora-like. Have to say the NYTimes Cooking site is my go-to because they're really well-tested and try to get you to step outside of your old East Coast white person comfort level indicative of the typical reader of said paper.

    Anyway, yeah, when DD was your son's age we did a lot of homemade sushi. She was the bomb with rolling. Swear she was a stoner in her last life. So those little hands can really do some great things, so little wraps (anything ravioli-ish like pakoras or pasties or the beloved tamales) or mini bites/canapes, things with toothpicks, all = FUN kid food.

    Not sure about "holiday" but thinking more what your kid can do.
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  11. #10

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    This post is a bit OT but,
    This thread reminds me of my childhood. My dad was an amazing cook. While our neighbors had traditional 'American' meals, my dad was always looking through cookbooks to find recipes from around the world. (Mexican was a favorite at our house and all the neighborhood kids wanted to come over when he cooked Mexican food. This was the early 70's in the Midwest - not to much diversity in our area.)

    Anyway, on Christmas Eve he typically made a meal from a different country. It wasn't necessarily their Christmas menu. Some of the years he made - Hungarian, Cajun, German (his family heritage), Slovak (my mom's family heritage), Mexican, Swedish, etc. We had open house on Christmas eve so my parents had a lot of friends stop by and enjoy the food throughout the evening. I really miss those times and for many years got a bit down over the holidays. It took me years to accept the fact that my family will never have those types of celebrations and that we need to find our own traditions. (I don't like cooking, am an introvert without many friends, and we have very little family.) So, our traditions are simple and, in contrast to my entertaining loving parents quite boring, but my children still love them.
    finished 8th grade (our fifth year homeschooling)
    Dumplett (girl - age 14) and Wombat (boy - age 14)

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