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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by skrink View Post
    is the school truly ASD friendly? Are they willing to work with dd on necessary accommodations?
    I may not necessarily look for specifically ASD friendly but disability-friendly schools. Every school has a disability services office. (I realize the term disabled is problematic, but this is what it is called on most college campuses, through it is starting to change. So for sake of brevity I'm going with this.) While all colleges are required by law to provide accommodations to students who have difficulties, some are more friendly about it than others.
    A mama, who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.
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  3. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by skrink View Post
    I live in Big 10 country where people enroll at OSU just to get the student discount for football tx (and promptly drop out after the season is over). I grew up in PA and with PSU mania and thought I had seen it all, but if anything it's worse here. I'd be curious to see the budget but I think it would make me sad. And angry.
    I have two kids attending OSU now and one who graduated from there. The way the student athletes are treated vs. the regular students makes me ill.

    BTW, one thing I was worried about with an Aspie child was housing. At OSU, my son was able to get a single room which I think made a huge difference for him in how he adjusted. Of course, I'll never know how he would have done with a roommate. I don't know if this could be an issue for your daughter or not.

    Erica

  4. #13
    Senior Member Arrived skrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebh87 View Post
    I have two kids attending OSU now and one who graduated from there. The way the student athletes are treated vs. the regular students makes me ill.

    BTW, one thing I was worried about with an Aspie child was housing. At OSU, my son was able to get a single room which I think made a huge difference for him in how he adjusted. Of course, I'll never know how he would have done with a roommate. I don't know if this could be an issue for your daughter or not.

    Erica
    How did your son do overall at OSU? How were they in terms of accommodations beyond getting a single room? And yes, housing is a big concern. Dorm life in general may not be a great thing for her. I just don't know. Fortunately we have a few years between now and then, and what she is capable of coping with is likely to change a great deal.
    Skrink - mama to my 14 yo wild woman

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by skrink View Post
    How did your son do overall at OSU? How were they in terms of accommodations beyond getting a single room? And yes, housing is a big concern. Dorm life in general may not be a great thing for her. I just don't know. Fortunately we have a few years between now and then, and what she is capable of coping with is likely to change a great deal.
    My situation is different because my son hasn't been officially diagnosed with Asperger's. We knew something was different with him, but didn't figure out exactly what it was until he was 17 or 18 when I read the symptoms and was shocked at how most described him. We decided not to tell him because we thought it would upset him.

    I did contact OSU housing and tell them that we suspect our son has Asperger's and having roommates would cause him great anxiety and stress (we were told that most rooms were quads and I don't see how he would survive with three roommates in a small space). They asked for an official diagnosis, but I didn't have one and they accommodated us anyway. Maybe because they didn't want trouble in the future? I don't know, but I am very grateful. So, I don't have any experience with how OSU would help in other areas.

    My son is doing well at OSU. He is finishing his junior year. Academically, he's doing fantastic. However, I take care of a lot of non-academic things for him like helping him choose classes, scheduling courses, applying for internships, etc. I don't know if I am doing too much for him or not. He seems so clueless about everyday things, yet he functions extremely well in his classes without any assistance from me. He had a bit of a meltdown when we first left him there, but he's been in the same dorm every year and is very comfortable there.

    He has a summer internship with a big company that should lead to full-time employment after graduation. It is going to be very stressful for us because he is a terrible driver, bad with directions, and hasn't lived on his own before (not counting the dorm since he doesn't have to shop, cook, etc.) It's going to be a big job for us to settle him in his own place and make him comfortable with the route going to/from work and figuring out shopping and stuff like that. His job is in an extremely congested area in Columbus and he grew up in a semi-rural area so he has no idea what he's getting into.

    And, yes, your daughter has a lot of growing/changing to do in the next few years! It is hard to predict what she will be like when she is ready for college. I tend to underestimate/baby my son and he almost always surprises me in what he accomplishes.

    Erica

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