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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by skrink View Post
    I cannot fathom the parents calling professors thing. I would have been mortified if my parents had attempted to intervene, ever. They were barely aware of the classes I was taking, and that's the way I liked it - it was MY deal. What happens when these snowflakes enter the workforce? Is mom following them there, too? How appalling. I'm going to guess that since undergraduate degrees are becoming so common, and so expensive, parents feel more personally invested and determined to make sure jr has that piece of paper in hand, no matter what.
    One better: my friends run a tiny husband/wife architecture firm in town and she told me about the not one but two recent grads who came into the interviews this last spring...with their parents! (In fairness it was not both parents for both interviewees, but one parent actually did quiz them about compensation and overtime. OMFSM)
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

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  3. #22
    Senior Member Arrived skrink's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastweedpuller View Post
    One better: my friends run a tiny husband/wife architecture firm in town and she told me about the not one but two recent grads who came into the interviews this last spring...with their parents! (In fairness it was not both parents for both interviewees, but one parent actually did quiz them about compensation and overtime. OMFSM)
    Holy crap!! How to ace yourself out of a job offer - bring your flipping parents along! Either mom/dad are hella controlling, or kiddo was born with an overinflated sense of entitlement and no backbone. I would bet these are the kind of people who would sue if their kid didn't get an offer. *shiver*
    Skrink - mama to my 14 yo wild woman

  4. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by inmom View Post
    According to dd, you'd be surprised how many of these parents are out there!! Geez, they're adults, PEOPLE!!
    Actually all it takes is a bit of reading on the Chronicle of Higher Education - In the Classroom - message boards to realize how many are out there. That is the board where the professors vent. Some of the stories are really funny.
    Mom to two boys
    14 year old/9th grade homeschooler
    Non homeschooled son heading to Reed College this fall, and proudly wearing his Reed/Atheist t-shirt.

    I spend a lot of time sitting in an ice skating rink - still

  5. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by skrink View Post
    Holy crap!! How to ace yourself out of a job offer - bring your flipping parents along! Either mom/dad are hella controlling, or kiddo was born with an overinflated sense of entitlement and no backbone. I would bet these are the kind of people who would sue if their kid didn't get an offer. *shiver*
    Yeah like I said it was quite a headscratcher for my friend. She doesn't have kids and is all like "kids these days but WTF Parents?" and yeah crayzay. Another anecdote: a poster on this very website would often talk about correcting her daughter's papers...college papers... But I am with you, my mom wouldn't even pick me up from college when school was finished for the semester (Find a ride yourself, you're resourceful) so there would be no way I coulda/woulda ever asked her for help.
    Eclectically homeschooling 8th grade dd, who likes science as much as art...

  6. #25
    Senior Member Arrived Avalon's Avatar
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    All this talk about "top tier" universities makes me feel like I'm on a foreign planet. I was the first person in my family to attend university at all. None of my grandparents, parents, or siblings attended. I did have a couple of older cousins who went, but I didn't know them. I was the first person for whom it was even possible. Simply graduating from university was "top tier" in my family. No one ever talked about which schools were "better." I wasn't really aware such a thing existed.

    25 years later, I hope my kids realize that I expect them to get a degree, but I'm really not fussy about what degree or from where. A heck of a lot of people don't actually work in the area they studied in. I see a degree as what a high school diploma used to be - it's just your basic education, to get you started somewhere. Lifelong learning, re-training, and graduate degrees seem to be the way the world works now, so don't blow all your resources on what amounts to a "starter" degree.

  7. #26

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    Avalon, same was true for me and my siblings. We were the first generation to go to college. I think what some of our own kids may feel is a societal pressure (from news, social media, peers) to try for the "top tier" schools. It wasn't a problem for my daughter, but for some reason my son feels that pressure. I'm trying to talk him down, really I am!!
    Carol

    Homeschooled two kids for 11 years, now trying to pay it forward


    Daughter -- a University of Iowa graduate: BA in English with Creative Writing, BA in Journalism, and a minor in Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies

    Son -- a Purdue University senior majoring in Computer Science, minoring in math, geology, anthropology, and history

  8. #27

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    Oh, the helicopter parents in college. It is aways nice to get a phone call from parents to challenge my assessment that their child plagiarized or to ask about their grades. Fortunately there are laws in place, FERPA, which forbids me from discussing work with anyone else. If I wanted to deal with parents I would have taught high school.

    Students can sign a wavier. For example college athletes on scholarship sign a wavier that I can talk to anyone at the college about their grades. (I don't like that either, especially when I know the coach is reviewing everything I say and do. )

    I had one parent who apparently had their kid sign the waver (not an athlete) and I told her I didn't have the paper on my desk and as a result I couldn't going to talk with her.
    A mama who teaches college writing, as well as help her 11-year-old in
    choosing his own life adventure. Using Global Village School to support our desire to develop a sense of social justice and global awareness.

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