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paganmomblog
07-07-2010, 10:40 AM
I have a "hearing" dyslexia where I hear things backwards so I often ask people to repeat themselves so I can try to get it right. On occasion I get my numbers switched up or even type words switched up but not as often as the hearing issue. My husbands brother also had dyslexia but his was of the more common reading variety. His was so bad he refused to read if he could avoid it. He wasn't so much illiterate just too impatient.

Bring in my son. I have already started going over lower case letters and phonics with him. I noticed he has a habit of switching up b and d & 3 and E when writing and identifying. I didn't think much of it at first because I understood it to be fairly common when first starting out. Both of his older sisters did the same thing. However I have noticed that he also will say w for m and has told me my lowercase t looks like a j. I have a tail on my t like it does here in type so I can see how to him it looks like a backwards j of sorts. I am wondering if I should have him tested though. I don't know how common it is for those letters to be confused together so maybe it's not anything to worry about?

Marmalade
07-07-2010, 11:10 AM
I tried to find a list of commonly confused letters but just found the really common ones (b and d, for instance)

I did find this article though:

http://www.dys-add.com/symptoms.html

ercswf
07-07-2010, 11:54 AM
My self and my older son are dyslexic. he writes his 6's like his dad only backwards so they look like 2's but if you don't know how he writes his 2's you will confuse them with his sixes. his three's are backwards and sometimes his 9's and other numbers. For letters and words there are to many to list. (yet the boy reads 3-4 grade levels ahead) As far as testing goes I was actually told by the one who does the testing at the public school that my son was in that she did not need to test him to tell he was dyslexic and that I was the best person to help him since I have already had to deal with and resolve (mostly) the issues he is having to.

Testing is a good idea if it really concerns you. We however are focusing on helping my son me more aware of what is going on so he can work on correcting and/or stopping some of the mistakes. (like I personally have to be on guard all the time in my writing I know I do so I never start writing for others (on paper not computer) unless I have the time to take to make sure it all comes out write. For me using the computer has made my written communications much easier.

Just gather as much info as you can on the subject.

paganmomblog
07-07-2010, 12:44 PM
I tried to find a list of commonly confused letters but just found the really common ones (b and d, for instance)

I did find this article though:

http://www.dys-add.com/symptoms.html

Thank you, that helps! Actually he shows very few of those symptoms. He can rhyme like crazy and is picking up phonics pretty well. I will just try not to stress over it and see how it goes.

paganmomblog
07-07-2010, 12:47 PM
Testing is a good idea if it really concerns you. We however are focusing on helping my son me more aware of what is going on so he can work on correcting and/or stopping some of the mistakes. (like I personally have to be on guard all the time in my writing I know I do so I never start writing for others (on paper not computer) unless I have the time to take to make sure it all comes out write. For me using the computer has made my written communications much easier.

Just gather as much info as you can on the subject.

I actually really don't want to have him tested if I can help it. The idea that it's something "wrong" with him just bothers me. I really hated how I was treated so differently once the discovery was made I had dyslexia. Not that we shouldn't have known or anything, it's just it went to extremes and I would rather him accept himself as he is and not view it as "wrong". LOL I hope that made sense. I will work with him on his areas and if he adapts new roadblocks along the way then we will tackle it best we can. Thanks alot for that, it helps to know that even if he will never master writing, he will have technology on his side and not struggle like our older generations.

SherryZoned
07-07-2010, 12:56 PM
Okay this is my thoughts of having no experience with Dyslexia at all!

Maybe wait to get him tested because he is still so young!

BUT even if you do test him remember you are homeschooling so therefore you don't have to deal with school politics but knowing could maybe help you determine how best for him to cope with his dyslexia? I don't know, do they let you know the severity or where you need to work on what more when you are tested?

knowledge is power and no one else has to know lol

paganmomblog
07-07-2010, 02:38 PM
!

BUT even if you do test him remember you are homeschooling so therefore you don't have to deal with school politics but knowing could maybe help you determine how best for him to cope with his dyslexia? I don't know, do they let you know the severity or where you need to work on what more when you are tested?
l

I have a hard time answering this question because I was diagnosed at 15 and I am more than twice that age now lol. Seriously though I just remember sitting with the doc and my parents. The diagnosis also came along with a bipolar disorder. The distinct sentence I remember most was "Angela should be in 12th grade as smart as she is" and my mom just start screaming at me because for the past 3 years I cut classes because I was bored out my skull. They made her and my dad leave because of her outburst (i was in a psychiatric hospital at the time). Next thing I know I am on meds. I didn't see any special teachers ever, not even when I went to summer school while in drug rehab the next year. No one ever told me how to deal, I just had to figure it out on my own. Ever since that moment and until I ran away all I heard was "you are so smart, just apply yourself more" and "stop acting like you have s--- for brains".

LOL this alone explains alot on why I have strong feelings about testing and even western medicines.

schwartzkari
07-07-2010, 04:04 PM
Angela, I'm really glad you started this thread. I've been wondering if I should have my daughter tested for dsylexia because she gets b and d confused, cannot learn how to tie her shoes and when she's reading, she often will replace words in the story or add words to the story. She also gets some basic numbers confused, like the number 12, 3 and E. She also cannot remember which hand is left and right.

My younger sister was diagnosed with dsylexia when she was in elementary school. She couldn't speak fully until she was about 4 years old. Myself, I often talk backwards or combine my words together and math is NOT my strong point. LOL. Other than what I mentioned above, my daughter is really bright and usually does an excellent job on her school work.

My question is, where would I take my daughter to get tested if I decided to? Is it something that regular health insurance would cover?

hockeymom
07-07-2010, 05:36 PM
Kari: I wouldn't worry yet. All those things you mentioned are totally normal for kids your daughter's age. My son never mixed up his bs and ds until kindergarten (he learned all the letters before he was 2 and was reading by the time he started K)--I can't figure out how they messed him up there but it's been surprisingly hard to shake. He adds words or replaces them too when reading aloud, and he's a very fluent reader. I started paying more attention to really listening to myself read aloud to him, and realize I do it too--I'm sure we all do a little bit, especially if we're really into a story (or really bored with it! LOL). Laces aren't always mastered until 7 or beyond (it's A LOT of coordination and hard work!), same with left hand/right hand. How many adults do you know who still have to consciously think about which is which? I try to tell my son "which hand do you write with? that's your right" (of course that won't work with lefties!). I know he KNOWS, it's just pretty low down on the list of things going on his brain to think about. I admit I don't have any experience with dyslexia but what you've described sounds like most all the kids in my DS's kindergarten and grade 1 classes.

BTW: Speech delay isn't necessarily connected with dyslexia or anything other "learning problems". My son was diagnosed with severe apraxia when he was 3, but DH and I felt very strongly that it would work itself out on its own. The speech therapist warned (actually threatened) us that if we didn't try to correct it immediately he would always struggle and might never have normal speech, but we followed and our gut. It took some time but today you'd never know--actually it was really neat watching (listening) him figure it all out on his own, in his own time and space.

schwartzkari
07-07-2010, 05:48 PM
Thanks hockeymom :) I'm definitely feeling the same as Angela here...not knowing if certain behaviors are common in every child. I'm always leary to consult a doctor on these kinds of issues because 1. we homeschool (and that means we are automatically weird, right? LOL!) and 2. I feel like the answer is always "let's put them on medication!"

My sister was diagnosed with dyslexia about 11 years ago, at the time the school blamed her speech problems directly on it. I'm sure research has come a long way in the last 11 years.

paganmomblog
07-07-2010, 06:07 PM
That automatic need to medicate really bothers me. If I can spend my time patiently working with him then why do it, ya know? I mean I am already patiently working with him when we assume he is "normal" so why not give that a whirl if he wasn't.

Kari- given that we are already recognizing that their could be a problem, i am going with not stressing about it too much. We aren't quite like those parents who say "oh no, not MY child" and ignore the issue. I think if all the current roadblocks are still present in a couple years with no progress in the right direction, then testing would be beneficial so that you know for sure. And from what I have read, research has changed quite a bit and there are tutors who specialize in dylsexic kids who use different techniques to help them get through.

As the old Virginia Slims ad went "We've come along way baby!"

schwartzkari
07-07-2010, 08:03 PM
That automatic need to medicate really bothers me. If I can spend my time patiently working with him then why do it, ya know? I mean I am already patiently working with him when we assume he is "normal" so why not give that a whirl if he wasn't.

Kari- given that we are already recognizing that their could be a problem, i am going with not stressing about it too much. We aren't quite like those parents who say "oh no, not MY child" and ignore the issue. I think if all the current roadblocks are still present in a couple years with no progress in the right direction, then testing would be beneficial so that you know for sure. And from what I have read, research has changed quite a bit and there are tutors who specialize in dylsexic kids who use different techniques to help them get through.

As the old Virginia Slims ad went "We've come along way baby!"

LOL, my grandma smoked Virginia Slims years ago...

I think you are right, nothing to be alarmed about, just keep an eye on things. :)

SunshineKris
07-09-2010, 02:30 PM
I haven't read through all of the responses. I just wanted to say that at nearly 10 years old my daughter still sometimes mixes the lower case b and d. And 2 and 6. and p and q. She reads well, I think. She loves to read but I sometimes wonder if she is just skimming words and not saying anything about it. But her spelling is generally awful She'll spell it for the test but never again. I think to myself that she's learned to short-term some things. But maybe not. I do know that Phonics isn't taught often in schools anymore and teachers now let poor spelling slide (you know, we don't want to hurt their feelings, nor does spelling matter but the point trying to be made does). I am a speller and a reader. I can't stand it when she does these things but I am not fully sure it's her own fault or laziness. DH didn't read well. He memorized what words looked like to read, not how they were pronounced. He thinks he may have been dyslexic, or maybe he just wasn't taught (he barely graduated high school; he is now an AF officer with a Master's degree and teaches for Embry Riddle; he read well though out loud he is still slow).

If the backwards letters and numbers continue well into the elementary years and you are truly worried, then have him checked. But at 4 years old this is common.

Firefly_Mom
07-15-2010, 04:25 AM
Just an FYI (since if you have your kids tested at some point, you'll be hearing these words anyway): Dysgraphia is the term for problems with writing, dyslexia is the term for problems with reading, and dyscalculia is the term for problems with math. ("Problems" being defined as switching letters or symbols, skipping words altogether, etc). Dyslexia used to be the catch-all term, but as with everthing else, they like to change things up :) You can often tell how long it's been since a person had any training by whether or not they use the catch-all term, or if they seperate them out into individual issues. Since not everyone has every issue, I prefer to have them seperated. No sense working on a problem you don't have! Most testers worth their salt won't test kids before about the age of 8, as number and letter switch-ups are pretty common before that age and generally work themselves out.

As for finding a tester, I really can't stress enough my abhorance for being tested through the school district. I have seen *way* too many families walk away in worse shape than when they went in, simply because the testing was offered for free. I've even talked to parents who allowed their kids to have psych evaluations done, simply because the school district told them it was "required:. *stepping off of soap box* :)

I recommend checking this site: http://www.brightsolutions.us/ Even if you don't choose to use a tester who has been trained in her methodology, there is some really good info on the site.

Fiddler
07-15-2010, 08:20 AM
This is a bit of an aside, but still somewhat related. :)

A SF/Fantasy book I read earlier this year called Spellwrigh (http://www.blakecharlton.com/)t, in which the main character is a cacographer (i.e., a wizard who can't spell his spells right, LOL), was written by a dyslexic author/med student at Stanford.

As far as diagnosing dyslexia goes, I still wonder about Jazz, but won't have him tested as I think that would crush his already fragile self-esteem. He started reading "late" (8 or so--but that's on track for right-brained or visual-spatial learners who typically learn to read around ages 8-10), and quickly jumped years ahead, reading-level-wise, but until this year still switched b and d and wrote 3 and 6 backwards. He has definitely grown out of a lot of his more unusual habits in the past year or so, including swapping "later" and "earlier," and using adjectives after nouns (I used to joke to myself that he must have spoken a different language in the life previous to this one), unless he is extremely tired.

This article by Brock and Fernette Eide is truly interesting to me, and bears further exploration on my part: Stealth Dyslexia (http://www.davidsongifted.org/db/Articles_id_10435.aspx).