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sb12345
07-06-2010, 01:57 PM
Vermont homeschooling laws allow it and I am all for it, I am just wondering who else has done this?

I just got licensed to be a day care provider from my home. I went to college for Special Education and early childhood development.
My oldest nephew is 8 and the youngest is 3.

I am just nervous since I will also be providing care for a 7 and a 10 year old. They will start in September and will only be here from 3-6, but my nephews will stay from 8-7 on most days.

My nephews adore my daughters and my son adores his cousins, so I am not too worried about them getting along, just all the work.

My sister just decided on this yesterday. We have been discussing it and I left the invitation open to her. I am most worried about the 8-year old. He is entering the 3rd grade and I am just so scared about everything. I was worried about my Kinder girl, now I'm even more worried about a 3rd grader. My sister will pay for everything her children need for school. My 3 yo nephew and daughter will be working Pre-K together so I am not too worried about them. Just the 8-year old.

Has anyone else homeschooled children who weren't their own? Any advice? Thanks.

SunshineKris
07-07-2010, 01:02 AM
I haven't done this so I have no advice in that arena. But if you are worried about teaching 3rd grade because you aren't sure what they should be learning or knowing, what's expected by the state (if you need to have an evaluatin at some point) I'd first check with state standards, then look for a book (I hear about the What Your Xth Grader Should Know series), then ask your sister what she's expecting. As for the two others who will be joining later in the day, I would figure that your "formal" school day will be over by the time they get to your house so maybe that could be time for them to do their homework (if they are public school kids) or time for all the kids to just chill out. Play, read stories, do crafts, get outside, go for a walk nearby, the possibilities are endless there.

Obviously your sister trusts you. Just ask what she is hoping for, learn about his age/grade, then go on from there. You are also obviously confident you can homeschool successfully otherwise you would not have chosen to do it for your own kids. I often have thoughts of earning a Master's in Early Childhood then opening my doors in order to homeschool other people's children (like running my own private school for younger kids without jumping through hoops for the state gov't). Good luck! I can't wait to hear about how it goes so I can follow in your footsteps, sorta.

InstinctiveMom
07-07-2010, 01:56 AM
We're kinda doing this... my niece is staying with us this summer (she's in a charter school) and since we school through the summer, she's doing school work, too. My brother and his wife are planning on building a house near us and my sister in law and I are planning to school all four of our combined kiddos together (and since I'm the planner, I'll plan and she'll help). It's an interesting dynamic, having more than just your own children in a learning environment. In some ways it's nice because you're accountable in a way that you're not when it's just your own. It's also stressful at times trying to balance out personality conflicts or bad-mood days when you have additional children underfoot. One of the best parts for us is being able to pick up and GO when things get frustrating cooped up at home (which thankfully we have had little of with all the summer stuff to so).

I agree with what Kris said - clarify expectations, keep communication open, and evaluate often (for your own peace of mind, and to make sure that the arrangement is still working for all of you). You sound well-qualified - but even with out all that, I bet you'd still create a great environment for the kids to learn in! And just think - everything you do now will MORE than prepare you for when your kids are in the upper grades. Confidence, mama!! :)

sb12345
07-07-2010, 11:55 AM
Thank you.

My sister is here with me now and we are going to making a 'plan of attack'.

I asked for previous report cards and sample of works. I also asked for his previous teacher's number so I can contact her and maybe she can emial me the scope and sequence of last year so I can see where he left off. I am thinking of just getting Horizons or another math program for him since it would take a lot of time to plan his math along with my daughters. I might just get them doing a math program also, supplementing with my own things.

wild_destiny
07-07-2010, 12:44 PM
I am intrigued by the talk of wanting to homeschool other people's children, because I have wanted to do something similar to this too. Currently, another mom and I homeschool the children from our two families together. She handles the math and science, and I do the other subjects. We have talked about how neat it would be if we were able to do this and get paid for it from our own homes for other children, but neither of us know how this would be regulated by the government and what credentials we would need, and so on. One of the things we like best about homeschooling is that we can teach what we want (more or less) with little government interference. We love the closeness you get to your students--and that the kids get to personal knowledge--that comes from the small size of a homeschool and the close teacher/student contact--or in other cases, the freedom of a student to lead his/her own learning at his own pace. Anyway, it is not that we are greedy (wanting to be paid), but that the amount of time that often goes into making lesson plans is extensive--and the books aren't cheap either. Does anyone know if this kind of thing is regulated, or how one would find out?

sb12345
07-07-2010, 01:04 PM
I am intrigued by the talk of wanting to homeschool other people's children, because I have wanted to do something similar to this too. Currently, another mom and I homeschool the children from our two families together. She handles the math and science, and I do the other subjects. We have talked about how neat it would be if we were able to do this and get paid for it from our own homes for other children, but neither of us know how this would be regulated by the government and what credentials we would need, and so on. One of the things we like best about homeschooling is that we can teach what we want (more or less) with little government interference. We love the closeness you get to your students--and that the kids get to personal knowledge--that comes from the small size of a homeschool and the close teacher/student contact--or in other cases, the freedom of a student to lead his/her own learning at his own pace. Anyway, it is not that we are greedy (wanting to be paid), but that the amount of time that often goes into making lesson plans is extensive--and the books aren't cheap either. Does anyone know if this kind of thing is regulated, or how one would find out?

Different states have different laws regarding whether you can even homeschool someone elses child. In vermont, I am allowed to homeschool another families children along with mine, or a max of two children from two different families.
Some states don't care at all. Some don't mention it in their laws which usually mean it is forbidden. The states that don't require to even be notified wouldn't know either way.

If someone you know trusted you enough to homeschool their child without credentials (a sister, cousin, friend, etc) then you wouldn't have to worry about credentials as long as your state allows you to homeschool someone elses child/ren. Also, some states that do allow to homeschool other peoples children will require credentials of the teacher, even though you don't need them for your own child.

Looking at your homeschooling state laws, they don't mention anything about homeschooling someone elses child, so I assume it either isn't allowed or was never addressed. I would contact your school district and ask for the specifics since the state laws are just general. What you are doing now, homeschooling with another mother and splitting the subjects is perfectly fine. They don't need to know. But if you took on someone elses child by yourself without the parent involved, I don't know what they would do if they found it. I don't know how they would though.

I would definitely call your district for the specifics. They may require you to call yourself a day care center and you would have to get a license for that, but as far as I know credentials aren't needed if it is out of home. It wouldn't hurt to ask your district. If they don't know, maybe they'll at least be kind enough to point you in the right direction.

HTH :)

wild_destiny
07-07-2010, 01:50 PM
Thank you, Stephanie. That is very helpful! Good luck in your homeschooling ventures, too!

SherryZoned
07-07-2010, 01:54 PM
I was definitely thinking the same thing. Homeschooling other kids with mine so I do not have to stress about how to work and homeschool my kids. Lots to learn, lots to figure out. I think it definitely would be cool to homeschool with another mom though if I could get out of math lol!

Good luck with your nephew you will do just great

wild_destiny
07-07-2010, 01:57 PM
I hear you, Sherry. You know, most people just have no idea how much time, work, planning and outright effort goes into homeschooling!!! The easier path--hardly!!

SherryZoned
07-07-2010, 01:58 PM
lol Deanna no kidding! It is not the easier path for sure. I mean what our kids learn and don't learn we are responsible for. We can not blame the public schools anymore lol

wild_destiny
07-07-2010, 02:00 PM
You said it, Sherry. And the responsibility is as scary as it is staggering.

sb12345
07-08-2010, 05:27 PM
You said it, Sherry. And the responsibility is as scary as it is staggering.

Haha, exactly how I feel.
I was always worrying about the 'gaps' in my childrens' future education and then I realized, they can fill those gaps if they feel the need. Obviously, I'll be touching all the most important things they need to know because, well, they are the most important things. If I forget to mention President Nixon clipped his toenails every Tuesday night, or that Queen Anne was really a man, they'll fill in the spaces if they see fit.

I'm still nervous to say the least, but seeing my little girls run up to me every morning asking what letter we'll learn today or what song we'll sing, it makes it all worthwhile.