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schwartzkari
07-05-2010, 03:55 PM
I'm currently studying to finish my early childhood teaching degree, mainly for the purpose of opening my own daycare in a few years. I go to school online and this week we are suppose to discuss the school choice options available to parents. I started this class 3 weeks ago and so far there has been alot of "parent bashing" in the forums...basically my other classmates are blaming ALL parents for why the public school system often goes wrong. I held my tongue quite a bit the last 3 weeks and when I saw that we were going to discuss school choice options, I thought "oh great, here we go...I just know that homeschooling is going to get bashed!"

So I start reading the assigned chapters from my textbook...school choice options are listed: public school, charter school, magnet school, private school...and that is it. Homeschooling wasn't listed anywhere!

On the one hand, I am extremely relieved that homeschooling wasn't discussed anywhere in the text...on the other hand, I'm wondering why it wasn't listed as a school choice option?

The thought of discussing homeschooling with my fellow students scares me...mainly because one of my classmates insists that humans don't need the sun to survive and another claims that the world was created in the 17th century. lmao...I'm dealing with some interesting people in my class!

mommykicksbutt
07-05-2010, 04:28 PM
One of the things that we have noticed about college teachers (not all are "professors") in our cumulative 23 years of college, grad school, and med school is that to pass the class you only have to satisfy the teacher, not the textbook author, not the other classmates, and often not the administration. All essays and discussions only have to entertain/pacify/placate/bring joy to the instructor. What is the teacher's position on homeschooling? If he/she feels that it is not an option then you have two choices... 1) let is slide and slip under the radar and tell them what they want to hear or 2) educate the ignoramus but suffer the consequences.

Jilly
07-05-2010, 04:39 PM
I have been working on getting my teachers credential for the last year. I am almost done with the program, and I have come across both positive and negative feelings toward homeschooling. I have had two textbooks that discussed it in a positive light. One was a technology book that spent a good deal of time talking about virtual schools and homeschooling.

I have often brought homeschooling up to my fellow students and teachers and have received all kinds of reactions. Mostly they were positive, but I did have one very negative experience. I was student teaching, and I told my adviser that two of my kids were homeschooled, and she was stunned. She then went on to tell me that they all had to be in school, and that I was ruining them for life. Everytime she had to evaluate my teaching, she brought up the homeschooling issue. The worst thing about this is that she use to be the principal at the elementary school that my daughter goes to, and she threatened to tell the school about my boys being homeschooled. It wouldn't have mattered, but it made me uncomfortable, and I finally talked to my school about her. They gave me a new adviser and disciplined her, and I was much happier with my new adviser. She was considering homeschooling her grandchildren, and she loved talking about homeschooling. :)

schwartzkari
07-05-2010, 05:23 PM
So far, I have had more positive than negative responses to homeschooling. When I signed up to finish my associates degree, my enrollment counselor with the college was very helpful and also told me that I was not the first parent she had come in contact with regarding homeschooling and getting a teaching degree. That made me very happy.

In the online classroom forum, the only mention I've made of homeschooling was in the bio we were asked to post of ourselves. I only said that I had been homeschooling my daughter for 3 years and was enjoying it very much. No one has commented on it. I have already decided that I'm not going to start any conversation about homeschooling in the forum myself BUT if any of my classmates bring it up, I will probably throw my two cents in. With the way the conversations have already gone, I expect negative reactions. There seem to be alot of narrow minded people in my class who don't think before they type!

ercswf
07-05-2010, 05:39 PM
I have a theory as to why homeschooling wasn't listed as an option. In my state Homeschooling is subject to private school standards. That means that homeschooling families are considered a private schools here.

Personally I have had many conversations (not by choice) with my SIL about how homeschooling is not the fix to the education system (I have never said it is) and she is adiment that it is the parents fault (yeah, thats why the schools, refused to have my son do his work and sent it [U]all[U] home for me to do with him and wanted me to buy a copy of the math stuff). But I also have a aunt who just retired from being a school teacher and she has nothing but praise for those who homeshool and was one who advised me (after trying to help with my issues with the school) to just bring my boys home.

I have had many people support it and then others that know arguing with me is like talking to a brick wall and won't voice their negative opinions.:D

schwartzkari
07-05-2010, 07:57 PM
I have a theory as to why homeschooling wasn't listed as an option. In my state Homeschooling is subject to private school standards. That means that homeschooling families are considered a private schools here.

Personally I have had many conversations (not by choice) with my SIL about how homeschooling is not the fix to the education system (I have never said it is) and she is adiment that it is the parents fault (yeah, thats why the schools, refused to have my son do his work and sent it [U]all[U] home for me to do with him and wanted me to buy a copy of the math stuff). But I also have a aunt who just retired from being a school teacher and she has nothing but praise for those who homeshool and was one who advised me (after trying to help with my issues with the school) to just bring my boys home.

I have had many people support it and then others that know arguing with me is like talking to a brick wall and won't voice their negative opinions.:D

I think you made a good point, one I didn't even think about. I recently read a letter from the TEA (texas education association) that was addressing homeschools and Texas homeschooling is considered a "private" school. That makes sense to me then as to why the textbook didn't include homeschooling in the list.

SherryZoned
07-06-2010, 12:57 PM
Are you able to do your teaching degree fully online? This is something I have thought about..but frankly I despise going into a classroom.. so if I could not have to actuallly leave me house I could do this lol

SherryZoned
07-06-2010, 12:58 PM
Texas is so easy to homeschool in.

We are considered a private school, we do not have to register that we are homeschooling, the only mandates are is basically you teach the kid the basics plus health. But nobody checks on you. you don't have to fill out any paperwork. I only had to give my sons school a letter stating what I was doing just to cover my butt when I withdrew him.

schwartzkari
07-06-2010, 05:02 PM
Are you able to do your teaching degree fully online? This is something I have thought about..but frankly I despise going into a classroom.. so if I could not have to actuallly leave me house I could do this lol

Yes yes! I'm going to University of Phoenix right now. :)

schwartzkari
07-06-2010, 05:07 PM
Well, just as I suspected, the homeschooling debate has started in my teaching class. Nothing too heated just yet but I'm sure it'll get there. One classmate commented that she was agaisnt homeschooling because "homeschooling directly affects the rightful funding to public schools." I have never heard this stance against homeschooling before. Her idea is that because parents choose to keep their children out of public school, the schools don't recieve funding for that missing child and she claims that is "unfair" to public school students.

I guess I could understand that theory in rural school districts...but I really don't think that city schools are affected by homeschooling all that much when it comes to funding...

SherryZoned
07-06-2010, 06:16 PM
Well, just as I suspected, the homeschooling debate has started in my teaching class. Nothing too heated just yet but I'm sure it'll get there. One classmate commented that she was against homeschooling because "homeschooling directly affects the rightful funding to public schools." I have never heard this stance against homeschooling before. Her idea is that because parents choose to keep their children out of public school, the schools don't recieve funding for that missing child and she claims that is "unfair" to public school students.

I guess I could understand that theory in rural school districts...but I really don't think that city schools are affected by homeschooling all that much when it comes to funding...

Actually yes they are in the city! In the school district I am in..at least half the schools are Title 1 schools.. Which means that more then 50% of the children get free lunches. So when they lose a child it is very detrimental to the school when they already do not get enough funds. when the lose a child like MY child, they not only lose money for him as a warm body in a seat but because he tests well every time and they get funding based on how well kids are doing on the tests... HOWEVER, it is not like we as homeschoolers get tax breaks, we still have to pay our taxes for public schools whether they are there or not.

schwartzkari
07-06-2010, 07:19 PM
Actually yes they are in the city! In the school district I am in..at least half the schools are Title 1 schools.. Which means that more then 50% of the children get free lunches. So when they lose a child it is very detrimental to the school when they already do not get enough funds. when the lose a child like MY child, they not only lose money for him as a warm body in a seat but because he tests well every time and they get funding based on how well kids are doing on the tests... HOWEVER, it is not like we as homeschoolers get tax breaks, we still have to pay our taxes for public schools whether they are there or not.

I stand corrected then! LOL :)
I might have to mention in my class discussion that homeschoolers do not get tax breaks...

SherryZoned
07-06-2010, 08:27 PM
HEHE Sorry I just have had a lot of contact with my son's school before I started homeschool. Oh the things you hear! It is craziness!

schwartzkari
07-06-2010, 09:48 PM
HEHE Sorry I just have had a lot of contact with my son's school before I started homeschool. Oh the things you hear! It is craziness!

LOL, that is okay, I would rather have the right facts!
On the bright side of this teaching class I'm taking, I really am learning alot about the inner workings of a public school system and I gotta tell you, it makes my family's choice to homeschool sound better and better every day! I went to a public school until 11th grade. My daughter has never been to public and neither will my son. I can't believe the drama and politics that are involved while educating kids. No wonder alot of my teachers seemed "grumpy" during class... ;)

inmom
07-07-2010, 06:02 AM
Having taught physics and math for 10 years at both the middle and high school levels, I had to UNLEARN much of what I did in a public school setting when I began homeschooling my own two kids. What works to maintain crowd control and determine learning is just meaningless in homeschooling. Homework, tests, and worksheets were necessary when one has 120 students a day to determine who knows what. Totally unnecessary when there's only two!

Sometimes the education degree, and experience, can be a detriment. Also, it does open your eyes to the "real" world of school and education. I'm thankful for the background, as I still use it to tutor local high school students after school for some extra income. But it certainly solidifies my reaons for keeping my own kids at home.

schwartzkari
07-08-2010, 10:42 AM
I'm almost done with this week long discussion on school options...just gotta get thru Sunday evening, LOL.
Anyways, I needed to rant a minute here. While no one in my classroom forum has specifically stated they disagree with homeschooling, many of them have agreed that children learn best in a classroom. This morning one classmate said (and I quote) "a child can ONLY learn BEST in a classroom setting with a teacher and students OF THE SAME AGE as them. They need the social interaction and the one on one face time ONLY a teacher can give a student."

I don't understand how someone can really believe that all students, especially K-5, all learn the exact same way. Like they are not individuals but sole property of the public school they attend. I'm trying very VERY hard to keep my homeschooling opinion out of my classroom forum BUT ridiculous statements like that really make me want to throw my pen and paper at the computer screen. It bothers me that future educators believe all children should fit inside a specific box, even if they are too big or too smart for that box. And don't even get me started on "face time" with a teacher...because we all know that a teacher with 15-30 students is really able to provide one on one time to each and every student whenever they need it *please read that in a sarcastic tone, thank you, LOL*

*deep breath*
Okay, I feel better now. :)

SherryZoned
07-08-2010, 10:46 AM
Not to mention it is not like the kids really get socialized in a school. They are micro managed, then when bullying happens the teachers do not take care of the serious problem. They get 30 mins for lunch and if they talk to loud nobody gets to talk and only 20 mins for recess. The rest of the time is basically sitting at a desk being quiet. How is that being socialized?

Jilly
07-08-2010, 10:55 AM
Have any of the students in your online class actually taught yet? I found that once my fellow students began their student teaching their outlooks changed greatly. You can read all you want and develop opinions based on that, but once you actually teach reality hits home. By the end of my student teaching almost every person in my seminar class agreed that the system was broken and that something needed to be done to fix it. At that point no one thought it was crazy that I home schooled.

schwartzkari
07-08-2010, 01:22 PM
Have any of the students in your online class actually taught yet? I found that once my fellow students began their student teaching their outlooks changed greatly. You can read all you want and develop opinions based on that, but once you actually teach reality hits home. By the end of my student teaching almost every person in my seminar class agreed that the system was broken and that something needed to be done to fix it. At that point no one thought it was crazy that I home schooled.

There are 20 people in my class, 21 if you include the instructor. The instructor and 3 other students have real teaching experience. The comment I qouted above was posted by an actual teacher! The rest of the class is full of future teachers or students like myself who want to run a small daycare...I am the only person who is homeschooling. I definitely value all sorts of opinions because I want my opinion to be valued by someone else...it just seems that such a broad statement should come from someone who has never taught before..not a teacher with years of experience! lol.

schwartzkari
07-08-2010, 01:25 PM
Not to mention it is not like the kids really get socialized in a school. They are micro managed, then when bullying happens the teachers do not take care of the serious problem. They get 30 mins for lunch and if they talk to loud nobody gets to talk and only 20 mins for recess. The rest of the time is basically sitting at a desk being quiet. How is that being socialized?

I have been trying to find a nice and polite way to discuss socialization in my classroom forum...but so far, everything I type up comes across as me being rude or seeming like a know-it-all. :D LOL! So, I delete it and never post a response.

SherryZoned
07-08-2010, 01:39 PM
Totally understand! most people just don't understand it! Not worth an argument really lol

hockeymom
07-08-2010, 01:48 PM
I think it's interesting how many of us here have our teaching degrees, are working toward one, and/or have worked in a classroom before becoming homeschoolers. To me, that speaks volumes. (BTW: I'm also working toward a teaching assistant degree, although I'm having a hard time finishing it up now that I know for sure that I could never work in a ps again).

Stay strong until Sunday! :)

hjdong
07-08-2010, 02:01 PM
How many of those students are parents? My sister thought hs'ing was nuts, although she (mostly) kept her opinion to herself. She was a teacher, then worked in D.C. at an educational "think tank," and now she is a professor. She admitted after I started hs'ing that it was working well "for us." Now that she has her own "quirky" (her words, I happen to think having an awesome imagination at 3 and wanting to wear dress up clothes everywhere is not quirky. Maybe I'm quirky) daughter, she worries about school "crushing" her. Again, her words, although this time, I agree.

edited because I can't type

schwartzkari
07-08-2010, 03:15 PM
I think it's interesting how many of us here have our teaching degrees, are working toward one, and/or have worked in a classroom before becoming homeschoolers. To me, that speaks volumes. (BTW: I'm also working toward a teaching assistant degree, although I'm having a hard time finishing it up now that I know for sure that I could never work in a ps again).

Stay strong until Sunday! :)

Thank you for the encouragement :)
I started college 10 years ago with the idea that I wanted to be a teacher. Then I had my own kids and everything changed, LOL. I have no interest in working for the public schools systems anymore. I feel like it's important to finish my degree mainly because I want to be a good example to my children and I can't stand to leave anything unfinished. I also thought having a teaching degree would help me out incase homeschooling laws ever change, get modified...etc etc.

schwartzkari
07-08-2010, 03:29 PM
How many of those students are parents? My sister thought hs'ing was nuts, although she (mostly) kept her opinion to herself. She was a teacher, then worked in D.C. at an educational "think tank," and now she is a professor. She admitted after I started hs'ing that it was working well "for us." Now that she has her own "quirky" (her words, I happen to think having an awesome imagination at 3 and wanting to wear dress up clothes everywhere is not quirky. Maybe I'm quirky) daughter, she worries about school "crushing" her. Again, her words, although this time, I agree.

edited because I can't type

Based on the bios posted in my class, about half are parents. I believe there is one grandmother in my class and the rest are 18-23 year olds. Very diverse group of people discussing school options! I did get a response from a younger student who said that she disagreed with homeschooling/online learning programs EVEN THOUGH she has no idea what homeschooling is about or how it works. Yes, she admitted that in her post. I often wonder how people can form opinions on things that they don't have a clue about?

One of the reasons we are homeschooling is because my daughter is what I call a "free spirit." :) She also enjoys wearing dress up clothes out, she dresses herself and most of the time the patterns and combinations are completely mismatched. She's got an imagination that sometimes I think is beyond her, lol and she uses words you wouldn't expect a 5 year old to use (example: Mommy, your cooking is extraordinary! Mommy, will you buy me this shirt? The patterns are beautiful and made my eyes twinkle when I saw it!" I definitely feel that public school would crush her and she'd be branded as "that weird girl." I love her and all her quirks :)

SherryZoned
07-08-2010, 03:38 PM
Ummm how can that person say they do not agree with online education when they themselves are online? I am not understanding.. the only word I can come up with is moron but I know that would be rude.

Yeah i love that the kids feel more free. I understand school uniforms in school environment with the gang issues but kids have no creative outlet in a school environment.

schwartzkari
07-08-2010, 07:26 PM
Ummm how can that person say they do not agree with online education when they themselves are online? I am not understanding.. the only word I can come up with is moron but I know that would be rude.

Yeah i love that the kids feel more free. I understand school uniforms in school environment with the gang issues but kids have no creative outlet in a school environment.

The instructor asked how many of us thought online learning was acceptable and when was the best time to use it. She wanted us to go over each school level..elementary, middle, highschool, college. You wouldn't believe how many people responded with negative remarks, even for college! Myself, I am extremely happy with the school, with the exception of the forum conversation this past week, LOL. The following week, we are talking about religion in schools! That should be awesome...

hockeymom
07-10-2010, 10:11 AM
I'm doing an online teacher assistant course, and today I found some real gems in my coursework (of course I no longer want to work in the schools and hope to continue homeschooling, but it was something I started before we brought our son home and want to finish).

For example:

"The new math curriculum stresses the importance of
teaching students math skills". Oh phew! I was afraid the emphasis would be on learning Latin!

"The new math curriculum stresses that all students need
to know enough math to lead intelligent lives as citizens". What a great objective, hey? (*sarcasm inserted here*)

And the one that really baffles me: "For example, offering elementary classes in Greek may be an
interesting “plus” at a particular school, but if the teachers
and textbooks can’t make such a course understandable to
the students, it isn’t developmentally appropriate". So you mean to say that the educational policy is that developmental appropriateness is only related to what the teacher or text is capable of? The student, then, is simply held out of the equation? AAAARRRRGGGHHHHH!!!!!!

And this is why we homeschool.

Thanks for letting me rant!

schwartzkari
07-10-2010, 10:33 AM
hockeymom, is that from your textbook?
Because it sounds almost exactly like my textbook!
HA HA!

hockeymom
07-10-2010, 10:37 AM
Yep, no wonder we homeschool! Who ARE these people?!

noddyknitter
07-10-2010, 11:24 AM
In reading this thread, so many things were going through my mind. First of all good job not loosing it with your classmates. i probably would have made a comment that got me into trouble.

My family is very new to Home Schooling. In fact this will be our first year doing it. The process of announcing it to my family and friends etc... has been very informative. Most people look at me in shock and tell me the same arguments that everyone has. Mostly it's socialization. (which I now understand is a joke) The thing is I have to admit until a few months ago I was kind of in their boat... I knew next to NOTHING about home schooling. What I did know or thought I knew was full of LOTS of misinformation and negative prejudice. It was not until I really did the research and started to look into things for myself with an objective eye that I finally understood.

I will admit I thought people who home schooled were off their rocker! Now most of the people I know look at me with that smile on their faces that you get when talking to some one unstable.

Interestingly enough, when I brought up to the principal of my kids school that we might pull our children this next year (at that point I thought in private school) she commented that anyone who had the opportunity to Home school or send their children to a private school should. Now what does that say?

Also don't feel bad for Title 1 schools. They get far more funding and are far better off than the non Title 1 schools. They may have a rougher student population, but they get all the best toys!

wild_destiny
07-10-2010, 11:58 AM
Kari, your daughter sounds like a delightful little girl. My own (just turned 7) daughter has the same "eclectic" style of dress, which definitely stands out in a crowd. :) And, hockeymom, you always crack me up--your little side comment about the Latin in math class. Too funny.
It does annoy me, though, when people bring up socialization as if that is the correct issue for a parent to be concerned with. If you really look at it, what passes as "socialization" in public schools is more often a pack mentality based on meaningless ideals like fashion and ridiculous concepts like "looking cool" or "fitting in". People do not seem to be too concerned with raising children who are well-mannered, polite, thoughtful, or independent learners with a social conscience. As long as your child goes to a public school and is getting enough poor quality "friend" time, then surely your child must be socialized properly. --Anyway, sorry about this little rant here, but I do get so tired of hearing the same ignorant words from people who do not homeschool, and who often have some of the brattiest kids around, but then they look down their noses at people who homeschool and use the "no socialization" excuse to justify their unfounded feelings.

SherryZoned
07-10-2010, 03:24 PM
noddyknitteer-- Not in this school district they don't get all the best. They do however have more opportunities for programs.. Rough! Is a kind word to what these kids are coming from in middle school and high school. The horror stories I hear and these are from people who work in the school

schwartzkari
07-10-2010, 05:15 PM
Kari, your daughter sounds like a delightful little girl. My own (just turned 7) daughter has the same "eclectic" style of dress, which definitely stands out in a crowd. :) And, hockeymom, you always crack me up--your little side comment about the Latin in math class. Too funny.
It does annoy me, though, when people bring up socialization as if that is the correct issue for a parent to be concerned with. If you really look at it, what passes as "socialization" in public schools is more often a pack mentality based on meaningless ideals like fashion and ridiculous concepts like "looking cool" or "fitting in". People do not seem to be too concerned with raising children who are well-mannered, polite, thoughtful, or independent learners with a social conscience. As long as your child goes to a public school and is getting enough poor quality "friend" time, then surely your child must be socialized properly. --Anyway, sorry about this little rant here, but I do get so tired of hearing the same ignorant words from people who do not homeschool, and who often have some of the brattiest kids around, but then they look down their noses at people who homeschool and use the "no socialization" excuse to justify their unfounded feelings.

I have honestly lost count of how many times the word "socialization" has been used in my classroom forum. That has been one of the main arguments FOR public school among my classmates: that public school provides the BEST socialization. I want to cry everytime I read that, LOL. Granted, I try to remember that 1. the classmates posting these comments are either younger than me and have NO kids or like my one classmate admitted, they have no clue what homeschooling is about. Feel free to rant! LOL, I feel the exact same way you do!

SherryZoned
07-10-2010, 07:15 PM
Okay I am going to try for the spring semester in getting my Teaching Degree.. UGH see what you did to me? I BLAME YOU HOMESCHOOLING!

wild_destiny
07-10-2010, 08:29 PM
Sherry, homeschooling will take the blame gladly. ;) And, wouldn't you know, Kari, that not 10 minutes ago, I was in a conversation with a very talkative extrovert ( a young woman about 20 yrs old with a 2 year old son, who is very well behaved for his age). The talk was going fine and I was commending her on her son's behavior and enthusiasm, when she out of the blue started telling me all sorts of things about homeschooling and how awful it is for the children, and how they all lack socialization skills and none of them can cut the umbilical cord and are all attached to their mothers. To be fair, she did not know that we homeschool. She went on further to say that all homeschooled students are severe introverts who do not have the ability to think for themselves and who can do nothing on their own. The irony here is that I am a definite introvert and I was public schooled. Apparently, she does not understand that being an introvert is a characteristic that one is born with. Anyway, what a talk. I just let her go on (mainly because my brain took a vacation and I couldn't find the words to adequately say, hey you are incorrect in a lot of your assumptions. So I went elsewhere. She is still sitting there with her misconceptions and I feel like I have missed an opportunity to set someone straight about an issue that matters to me. Thanks, brain. When I need you, you always go on strike!!

schwartzkari
07-10-2010, 08:38 PM
Okay I am going to try for the spring semester in getting my Teaching Degree.. UGH see what you did to me? I BLAME YOU HOMESCHOOLING!

Awesome! You won't be sorry :) I am learning so much...with the exception of the "interesting" classmates I'm dealing with, LOL.
:D

schwartzkari
07-10-2010, 08:45 PM
Sherry, homeschooling will take the blame gladly. ;) And, wouldn't you know, Kari, that not 10 minutes ago, I was in a conversation with a very talkative extrovert ( a young woman about 20 yrs old with a 2 year old son, who is very well behaved for his age). The talk was going fine and I was commending her on her son's behavior and enthusiasm, when she out of the blue started telling me all sorts of things about homeschooling and how awful it is for the children, and how they all lack socialization skills and none of them can cut the umbilical cord and are all attached to their mothers. To be fair, she did not know that we homeschool. She went on further to say that all homeschooled students are severe introverts who do not have the ability to think for themselves and who can do nothing on their own. The irony here is that I am a definite introvert and I was public schooled. Apparently, she does not understand that being an introvert is a characteristic that one is born with. Anyway, what a talk. I just let her go on (mainly because my brain took a vacation and I couldn't find the words to adequately say, hey you are incorrect in a lot of your assumptions. So I went elsewhere. She is still sitting there with her misconceptions and I feel like I have missed an opportunity to set someone straight about an issue that matters to me. Thanks, brain. When I need you, you always go on strike!!

My brain leaves me too when someone starts in on homeschooling face to face. Over the computer, I'm okay talking about it because I have time to sit and think about what I want to say. There have been several times that I've been caught off guard, like at my daughter's dance class. One of the other mothers asked me what school Eliana was going to in the Fall. I said "We've been homeschooling for almost 3 years, she'll be at home this year." and she said "Oh! I'm so sorry. *insert nervous laugh here* I know a family on my street that homeschools...we never see their kids outside. You must have all the patience in the world, I could never spend all day sitting around a table and teaching my kids."

Comments like that make me want to carry around homemade info brochures on homeschooling...and hand them out when needed!

I think it is okay you didn't continue the conversation with that woman. Sometimes it is just better to let it go!

wild_destiny
07-10-2010, 08:55 PM
Thank you, Kari, your response has helped. I was feeling a little bitter and down from that conversation. Keep you the good work you are doing with your own children! :)

belacqua
07-10-2010, 09:42 PM
The talk was going fine and I was commending her on her son's behavior and enthusiasm, when she out of the blue started telling me all sorts of things about homeschooling and how awful it is for the children, and how they all lack socialization skills and none of them can cut the umbilical cord and are all attached to their mothers. To be fair, she did not know that we homeschool. She went on further to say that all homeschooled students are severe introverts who do not have the ability to think for themselves and who can do nothing on their own.

The logic of this is eluding me. If homeschoolers are such severe introverts, yet they cannot think independently, where are they getting their thoughts?

Just stay the course, Kari. And next time you're subjected to this, play Homeschool Ignorance Bingo. Somebody says "socialization?" Mark the square! "All children learn best in the classroom." Mark the square! "Homeschoolers are all introverted weirdos who will never, ever learn to stand in line." Mark the square! And let them wonder why you suddenly yell BINGO in the middle of class.

schwartzkari
07-11-2010, 12:10 AM
The logic of this is eluding me. If homeschoolers are such severe introverts, yet they cannot think independently, where are they getting their thoughts?

Just stay the course, Kari. And next time you're subjected to this, play Homeschool Ignorance Bingo. Somebody says "socialization?" Mark the square! "All children learn best in the classroom." Mark the square! "Homeschoolers are all introverted weirdos who will never, ever learn to stand in line." Mark the square! And let them wonder why you suddenly yell BINGO in the middle of class.

I am laughing so hard I'm crying! You are hilarious! I could have yelled "BINGO" about 5 or 6 times now :)

schwartzkari
07-11-2010, 12:11 AM
Thank you, Kari, your response has helped. I was feeling a little bitter and down from that conversation. Keep you the good work you are doing with your own children! :)

Same to you! :)

schwartzkari
07-11-2010, 10:41 PM
Well, my week of discussing school choice options has ended and not on a good note! Our initial responses to school choice options were actually due this past Tuesday. One student was extremely late posting their response in the classroom forum. I was working on my homework last night and saw it. The way the class works, you get points for every post you respond to. Well, I couldn't let this one slip by me because I was so offended. They started off by saying that public school should be MANDATORY for all children ages 5-18 and that all other school options should be ILLEGAL, including private schools, magnet schools, charter schools and of course homeschooling. So they listed everything they found wrong with each type of school (apparently private schools are funded by the socially elite who want to "remove" the lower social classes...) and when they got to homeschooling they stated "ALL HOMESCHOOLERS ARE SOCIALLY AWKWARD AND BEHIND IN AGE APPROPRIATE SKILLS." (and yes, they typed it in capitals.)

I don't know about anyone else in this forum, but every time someone says something about socialization and homeschoolers, it hurts my feelings. I try to have a tough skin, I really do...because I understand that what we are doing as homeschoolers is deemed "different." I'm fine with being different, but it really bothers me when people make obviously false statements like they are the know-all-be-all about anything and everything to do with education.

Anyways, I did my very best to let the person know that they were being a complete jack-ass in their post. By the time I was done, I was shaking! And then of course I was angry because this person, who I don't even know...via the internet had gotten under my skin!

I'm super glad this week is over! We do not have any discussion questions to reply to this coming week, just essay writing. I am thankful for that...I need a break from the bias!

SherryZoned
07-11-2010, 11:16 PM
Wow! So much misinformation out there. I am sorry someone got to you but so glad your awful week is over!

hockeymom
07-12-2010, 06:14 AM
Oh Kari--I'm so sorry that you had to go through that! Did you ever come clean and tell the j.a. that you ARE a homeschooler thankyouverymuch and have very well socialized kids? I would have a hard time with hearing that too and dealing with such self righteous ignorance (and I've been known to be awake all night obsessing over mean forum comments!). I'm glad to hear it's over anyway!

*hugs*

schwartzkari
07-12-2010, 08:39 AM
Oh Kari--I'm so sorry that you had to go through that! Did you ever come clean and tell the j.a. that you ARE a homeschooler thankyouverymuch and have very well socialized kids? I would have a hard time with hearing that too and dealing with such self righteous ignorance (and I've been known to be awake all night obsessing over mean forum comments!). I'm glad to hear it's over anyway!

*hugs*

Yes, I told them that I had been homeschooling my lovely daughter for 3 years and in my experience the homeschooling community is a very diverse crowd with many options and chances to "socialize."

Thanks for letting me rant this past week! :)

Busygoddess
07-12-2010, 09:25 AM
I'm doing an online teacher assistant course, and today I found some real gems in my coursework (of course I no longer want to work in the schools and hope to continue homeschooling, but it was something I started before we brought our son home and want to finish).

For example:

"The new math curriculum stresses the importance of
teaching students math skills". Oh phew! I was afraid the emphasis would be on learning Latin!

"The new math curriculum stresses that all students need
to know enough math to lead intelligent lives as citizens". What a great objective, hey? (*sarcasm inserted here*)

And the one that really baffles me: "For example, offering elementary classes in Greek may be an
interesting ďplusĒ at a particular school, but if the teachers
and textbooks canít make such a course understandable to
the students, it isnít developmentally appropriate". So you mean to say that the educational policy is that developmental appropriateness is only related to what the teacher or text is capable of? The student, then, is simply held out of the equation? AAAARRRRGGGHHHHH!!!!!!

And this is why we homeschool.

Thanks for letting me rant!

Actually, those do kind of make sense.

Some Math programs put too much focus on memorizing the facts & fact families and not enough emphasis on understanding HOW the problems are done (aka: the skills). So, as ridiculous as it seems, you do need to specify what the focus of a given Math program is.

As for the Greek, well try using a boring high school level textbook to teach a foreign language to your 7 year old & you'll see what they mean. The materials have to be developmentally appropriate for a typical child in the target age range. Also, the teacher has to be comfortable with the subject & materials if they are going to be truly effective. While it's ok for us to stay one step ahead of our kids or learn/relearn the material right along with them, that wouldn't really be appropriate for a teacher with 20-30 students & a limited amount of time to work on that subject with them. So, in a classroom environment, the text used & the ability of the teacher to teach a subect so her students can truly understand it are larger parts of the equation.

Busygoddess
07-12-2010, 09:42 AM
Well, my week of discussing school choice options has ended and not on a good note! Our initial responses to school choice options were actually due this past Tuesday. One student was extremely late posting their response in the classroom forum. I was working on my homework last night and saw it. The way the class works, you get points for every post you respond to. Well, I couldn't let this one slip by me because I was so offended. They started off by saying that public school should be MANDATORY for all children ages 5-18 and that all other school options should be ILLEGAL, including private schools, magnet schools, charter schools and of course homeschooling. So they listed everything they found wrong with each type of school (apparently private schools are funded by the socially elite who want to "remove" the lower social classes...) and when they got to homeschooling they stated "ALL HOMESCHOOLERS ARE SOCIALLY AWKWARD AND BEHIND IN AGE APPROPRIATE SKILLS." (and yes, they typed it in capitals.)

I don't know about anyone else in this forum, but every time someone says something about socialization and homeschoolers, it hurts my feelings. I try to have a tough skin, I really do...because I understand that what we are doing as homeschoolers is deemed "different." I'm fine with being different, but it really bothers me when people make obviously false statements like they are the know-all-be-all about anything and everything to do with education.

Anyways, I did my very best to let the person know that they were being a complete jack-ass in their post. By the time I was done, I was shaking! And then of course I was angry because this person, who I don't even know...via the internet had gotten under my skin!

I'm super glad this week is over! We do not have any discussion questions to reply to this coming week, just essay writing. I am thankful for that...I need a break from the bias!

You can always tell when someone has no idea what they are talking about. I'm sorry that this person got to you. Something that has helped me not be bothered by people's negetive comments about homeschoolers is to look at my kids & remember some of the times they've utterly surprised people or regular events that disprove the stupid stereotypes. For example, when my son was 3 and someone at Walmart thought he was in Kindergarten because of how well-spoken he is, his large vocabulary, and the fact that he started a conversation with her, or the fact that the neighborhood kids knock on our door multiple times a day asking to play with the kids, etc. SO, maybe if you think about stuff like that, it'll help you to not be so offended when some jerk, who quite possibly is using homeschoolers they've seen on 'reality tv shows' like Wife Swap as their basis for their uneducated opinion, makes some ridiculous comment about homeschoolers being behind academically, socially awkward, etc.

wild_destiny
07-12-2010, 11:14 AM
Brandi, I can see what you are saying that those specifications (for teaching math and Greek, etc.) do make a kind of sense. But Hockeymom's take was just too funny to me!!
Kari, so glad your week of hell is over. Maybe in the long run this will turn out to be a good experience for you and help make your skin thicker, so that you can weather any other dismal remarks with calm (like I am one to talk), although it sounds like you weathered these storms just fine!! :)

schwartzkari
07-12-2010, 03:37 PM
You can always tell when someone has no idea what they are talking about. I'm sorry that this person got to you. Something that has helped me not be bothered by people's negetive comments about homeschoolers is to look at my kids & remember some of the times they've utterly surprised people or regular events that disprove the stupid stereotypes. For example, when my son was 3 and someone at Walmart thought he was in Kindergarten because of how well-spoken he is, his large vocabulary, and the fact that he started a conversation with her, or the fact that the neighborhood kids knock on our door multiple times a day asking to play with the kids, etc. SO, maybe if you think about stuff like that, it'll help you to not be so offended when some jerk, who quite possibly is using homeschoolers they've seen on 'reality tv shows' like Wife Swap as their basis for their uneducated opinion, makes some ridiculous comment about homeschoolers being behind academically, socially awkward, etc.

I was actually getting on here today to post about how my daughter made me proud today, lol! She has been working really hard on trying not to be so shy. Before, she would actually scowl and refuse to talk to anyone she didn't know. Today, we went to my old workplace to visit for a few minutes and a couple of the girls started talking to her. No one there knows we homeschool and one of the girls asked my daughter what grade she would be in, in the Fall. My daughter said "I'm in 1st grade and my mom homeschools me." and then she proceeded to tell anyone who was listening all about the butterfly unit study we were working on AND that she could read on her own. LOL! She was still talking when I told her it was time to go. She seems social enough to me :D

Busygoddess
07-12-2010, 06:41 PM
I was actually getting on here today to post about how my daughter made me proud today, lol! She has been working really hard on trying not to be so shy. Before, she would actually scowl and refuse to talk to anyone she didn't know. Today, we went to my old workplace to visit for a few minutes and a couple of the girls started talking to her. No one there knows we homeschool and one of the girls asked my daughter what grade she would be in, in the Fall. My daughter said "I'm in 1st grade and my mom homeschools me." and then she proceeded to tell anyone who was listening all about the butterfly unit study we were working on AND that she could read on her own. LOL! She was still talking when I told her it was time to go. She seems social enough to me :D

That's awesome! What a great proud mommy moment!

wild_destiny
07-14-2010, 11:13 AM
That is a terrific improvement for your daughter, Kari!! It is SO hard for a shy person to just get over it, so kudos to you for working with your daughter in a thoughtful way that helps her learn better social skills in a way that works for her (and you). Good job, Mom!! :)

hockeymom
07-14-2010, 01:09 PM
I wish my parents had taken my shyness seriously when I was a kid. It was debilitating until I was in my mid to late 20s and finally learned to work through it. Parents--and other well meaning adults--have no idea the damage they do when they laugh at a child's seriousness and shyness. I agree, major kudos to you Kari!

schwartzkari
07-14-2010, 04:33 PM
Thanks everyone!
I was super shy as a child...pretty much up until I met my husband. LOL. He helped me alot with meeting new people. I wanted to make sure my daughter didn't have the same issues as me, especially since we are homeschooling. I started just by introducing her to new people but not begging her or forcing her to talk back to them. Slowly, she started opening up...and within this last year and her taking dance class, she talks so much that sometimes I have to ask her to quiet down AND we had to have the "stranger danger" talk! :)