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EnchantedSchoolroom
02-15-2013, 01:47 PM
I was checking out the posts in Hybrid Homeschooling, and about what "style" works best, and I was wondering, anyone out there who mostly just supplements the schooling that their kids receive in an outside classroom/school?

Both my boys go to a fabulous play-based preschool. I just adjust, supplement, enhance, and occasionally introduce new subjects.

Like Montessori style continent box when my 4.5 year old was doing "Around the world" for their summer school, learning about different cultures/countries from around the world.

Or playing with Montessori Alphabet boxes when the 3 year old kiddo is doing beginning sounds at school!!!

I hope I can find a few others :)

dbmamaz
02-15-2013, 02:12 PM
if i understand what you are saying, that is generally called 'afterschooling'. But also be aware a lot of people dont consider it homeschooling or afterschooling until your child is old enough to be legally required to go to school.

hockeymom
02-15-2013, 02:23 PM
I never considered preschool to be part of my son's education when he was that age, it was just another activity like so many others he was involved in. I guess what you are describing just sounds like parenting to me; the alternative being sticking a kid in front of cartoons all day, I guess. I hope that doesn't come off as snarky; I just don't see it as homeschooling until a child is actually school age like Cara said. But hey, call it want you want and have fun! There are endless things to with preschoolers.

RTB
02-15-2013, 10:20 PM
Yes, afterschooling. I don't know how many ASers there are here, but you can always try a web search.

mpippin
02-16-2013, 02:53 AM
In grades that are compulsory, I never found that there was enough time for this "afterschooling" I hear about. The kids were so exhausted and bogged down with homework (that was confusing enough as it was) that even if there was extra time for adding in material, I never would have done, because it would have taken away what precious free time they had.

MrsJadeDragon
02-16-2013, 03:44 AM
In grades that are compulsory, I never found that there was enough time for this "afterschooling" I hear about. The kids were so exhausted and bogged down with homework (that was confusing enough as it was) that even if there was extra time for adding in material, I never would have done, because it would have taken away what precious free time they had.

Oh, this validates the concerns I have. Even just in preschool, finding time to supplement is impossible. When I discuss the possibility of homeschooling with friends and family, most (who do not have kids themselves) are often pushing for supplementing. Very little sympathy for "lack of time" because so many of my friends got tiger-parented into tons of school work and supplementing with little to no downtime. But it seems so unfair to me to theoretically put so many demands on my daughter's afterschool time.

rueyn
02-16-2013, 06:54 AM
Oh, this validates the concerns I have. Even just in preschool, finding time to supplement is impossible. When I discuss the possibility of homeschooling with friends and family, most (who do not have kids themselves) are often pushing for supplementing. Very little sympathy for "lack of time" because so many of my friends got tiger-parented into tons of school work and supplementing with little to no downtime. But it seems so unfair to me to theoretically put so many demands on my daughter's afterschool time.

By the time I would pick up my son from even a HALF day of preschool, he was so exhausted, he'd sleep most of the afternoon, then just want to play with toys and be left alone. Every kid is different, obviously, but that was our experience :)

farrarwilliams
02-16-2013, 08:44 AM
I know there are some after schoolers around, but I will admit to being another who doesn't get it. I do think homeschooling begins when you say it does - and, at least in my area, everyone goes to preschool at age 3, so you pretty much are starting homeschooling, even if you're not doing anything you wouldn't have done just as a parent a generation or so ago. But when a child is in school, I think it is just parenting. And then later, every parent adds some enrichment I hope. I think homeschoolers know all the best enrichment materials since its our bread and butter, so I do get that though.

Of course, real afterschoolers do a lot more than a little tutoring and arranging for music lessons or something, but I never could understand how it wasn't robbing the kids of needed free time, as others are saying. I'm a firm believer in free time as a really important learning tool.

Stella M
02-16-2013, 08:54 PM
I thought I would afterschool dd last year. Ha! Gave up on that on day 2.

OP, I guess I would also consider supplementing preschool as "just" parenting...good, awesome parenting though! There's no hurry to label what you do or don't do.

Once your children are of school age and if you are still supplementing their education, you might consider using the label of 'afterschooler' to identify yourself. There is another homeschool forum with an afterschoolers section - they tend to be the school age crowd though.

KittyP
02-21-2013, 12:33 PM
Kiddo is 4 and this is what we're doing in right now. He's in a co-op preschool that's just for playing with other kids his age and then at home we do fun educational projects to get him excited about learning. It's not schooling really, just trying to get him acclimated to something a little more structured so when we do start it won't be a big transition. It's also helping us get our feet wet so we know what we're doing and what does/doesn't work for us when the time comes. It's a giant experiment and we're all having fun figuring it out now when there's no stress or rush rather than waiting.

Mslksdh
02-21-2013, 01:26 PM
We fully homeschool our 6 year old. While our 4 year old attends a Montessori program twice a week, the other 5 days in a week he is homeschooled. I don't consider anything we do with our 4 & 1 year old supplementing. But then again I am a retired Montessori preschool teacher and I believe that education of the young child is very important. You are building a solid educational foundation. Feel free to pm me.

EnchantedSchoolroom
02-22-2013, 02:26 PM
That's the important part! Having fun.


But hey, call it want you want and have fun! There are endless things to with preschoolers.

EnchantedSchoolroom
02-22-2013, 02:42 PM
OK, I am officially calling what I am doing as parenting!! :)



OP, I guess I would also consider supplementing preschool as "just" parenting...good, awesome parenting though! There's no hurry to label what you do or don't do.


Anyway, my kids are not old enough for homework, and what little (the exact right amount) my older one (5) does get, he loves doing!!

I am not a tiger mom, pushing her kids relentlessly from one "enrichment program" to another! I don't get that either. I always wonder if those are supposed to benefit the kid or the parent?
Completely agree about free play.

What I mean are instances like this - the kiddos are playing with the Valentine's Day Sensory box (Enchanted Schoolroom: Spread the Love! (http://enchantedschoolroom.blogspot.com/2013/02/spread-love.html)) for 1.5 hours now, happily building and serving sparkly cupcakes, when I join in the fun, and ask them to make some patterns with the pink and purple hearts, and request my 3-year old to put only 12 beads on the pink pipe-cleaner please, as more might give me a tummy ache, or talk about candy cane recipes with my 5 year old (pink pompoms in the box triggered some memory!)

It is not structured, it goes with the flow, and last but not least, it is fun!

But as I said, just call it parenting :)

leakyowl
03-18-2013, 09:46 AM
I started out as an after-schooler (though this is the first time I've seen the word). My son adores science, and our science curriculum is a bit weak in the public school, so every weekend, we'd do an experiment or two, watch a science documentary, whatever sounds like fun. On Friday, my son and I will learn about a concept together and set up an experiment, then on Saturday, my nieces come over and he teaches them the concept and we all do the experiment together. It's a lot of fun for us and certainly doesn't feel like school. If I were to add on history or writing or math, my son would have thought it was punishment. But writing a lab report, doing calculations related to his experiment, or learning about historic science concepts was fine!

Our heaviest learning time was actually in the summers, when I'd put together unit studies for my son, step-son, and nieces. Those covered everything, not just science. It was a great dress-rehearsal for actually homeschooling. It also helped them fill in the gaps for the things they struggled in during the school year.

CrazyCatWoman
03-18-2013, 04:08 PM
When my oldest was 4 and 5, we lived in CA. I would go to the park and the other moms would say "Where does your daughter go to preschool? She is so smart, well spoken and well mannered!" I would say "She doesn't. She stays home with me." And...the conversation would end there and the other mom would slide quietly away from me. :-)

Finally I started saying that we homeschool. Even though we did nothing organized. I read to the kids, had art supplies available and we went to the beach and walks and stuff. We counted, said the alphabet when I pushed them on the swings and did random things. A friend had workbooks her kids loved to do but mine never liked them. I felt I was just being a good parents for what I could afford (which was not preschool!) But, when I said that we homeschooled, then the other mothers were JUST FINE! No more making excuses to go talk to someone else. I, "Was a Good Parent" now in their eyes.

Yes, my father wanted me to afterschool instead of homeschooling, but as my kid was already getting meaningless homework in Kinder and 1st grade, I knew that that was not an option. My daughter was tired and wanted to zone out. Weekends I wanted time to spend with her and her father in ways that were actually educational, but would not be recognized by other people as being so. (Well not then. Now, they have the Antique Roadshow spinoff about going to flea markets.)