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farrarwilliams
01-13-2013, 05:14 PM
If you had to label your homeschooling method, what label would you choose? Just curious how it breaks down.

Stella M
01-13-2013, 06:35 PM
Eclectic unschool-influenced Charlotte Mason style. Lol.

I predict there will be plenty of 'eclectic' and 'school at home', quite a few unit studies and classical ppl, fewer CM, unschool and Waldorf.

Batgirl
01-13-2013, 07:00 PM
I prefer the term, Traditionalist, since outside of that I don't view us as similar to school at all. But that's us, at least so far. My guess is that the group will be overwhelmingly eclectic.

farrarwilliams
01-13-2013, 07:11 PM
I prefer the term, Traditionalist, since outside of that I don't view us as similar to school at all. But that's us, at least so far. My guess is that the group will be overwhelmingly eclectic.

Good. I wasn't totally sure how to describe that because "school at home" is a term full of baggage and different conceptions. But some people think that the basic progressive-influenced standards model that schools use is basically the way to go, they just need to do it at home for some reason or want to because they think they can deliver it better from a practical standpoint.

Batgirl
01-13-2013, 09:09 PM
Yeah, it's institution that fails my kids, not the methods of instruction. Mostly. (I just realized I needed to qualify that, since I dislike busywork and Everyday Math as much as the next person. Crappy textbooks, too.)

lakshmi
01-14-2013, 12:01 AM
Eclectic unschool-influenced Charlotte Mason style. Lol.

This! But with MBTP because I can't think enough to organize too much.

But thanks to Stella, I love the narration, nature of Charlotte Mason. And when I read that she recommended REAL supplies for children I jumped on that wagon.

I can't manage to stay on any schedule for long. So love that my kids are perfectly capable of spending o 6 hours doing something on their own, like Origami.


NOT surprised by the eclectic approach. Just toooooo hard to find ONE thing that fits. (And that goes for my closet as well.)

Oceanseve
01-14-2013, 12:45 AM
Where's the "I'm whatever works this week" :p

blasphemoushomemaker
01-14-2013, 03:24 AM
Montessori for some things, Waldorf for others, unschooling-ish depending on the day, whatever works best for each child.

hockeymom
01-14-2013, 06:24 AM
Raising hand for eclectic here.

crunchynerd
01-14-2013, 07:55 AM
I like the term eclectic because it covers anything you want it to mean, and no one seems to question it much. It's like saying you're Agnostic. Or else, Undenominational. At least, I think so.

We have such a laid-back approach most of the time that I know we have unschoolish leanings, but we're not radical in it, and since my daughter is doing a curriculum, and I am teaching them abacus (though not with near as much of a set schedule as I probably ought to), I guess we aren't truly unschoolers. But my 8 year old does very little formal studies in a given day. Maybe about an hour, total. And my 5 year old does something like 5 minutes of abacus, most days, and that's it for formal anything for him, though I do want to start him on Foundations from Logic of English when it becomes available.

So we do a tiny dab of traditional or formal studies at home, and I do reserve the right to require the kids to do chores with me and learn things like cooking and cleaning according to age, but the majority of their time is spent doing what they like to do.

mpippin
01-14-2013, 08:16 AM
We are a mix of things that don't look like they get along very well at all, but it works for us. CM in that we love to read and we glean facts from stories very well. Waldorf in that we work well with crafty stuff and simple materials. Project-based learning because we like to stay with one topic for as long as we like and make stuff based on that. Unschoolish for science because it is a strictly delight-directed topic for us.

I think we're salad bowl homeschoolers here, with bits of different yummy things all mixed together.

rktowne
01-14-2013, 08:50 AM
I enjoyed "salad bowl". I know a person who says she's schooling "kibbles and bits" for the same sort of tossed salad idea. I think I could embrace a bowl of salad over a bowl of pet food personally in my metaphor.

I checked other. "CHILD LED" is how I've decided that it works around here.

I go very strongly by the idea of the Yeats quote, "Education is not filling a bucket but lighting a fire." So we follow the interests and passions of the kids to create an educational plan. From the outside looking in I've been called an unschooler, or an ecletic homeschooler but neither really seemed to fit for us as we've used curriculum but we really do go without it more than we go with it. So we're child-led homeschoolers.

wendygrace
01-14-2013, 08:54 AM
We're eclectic here. A little bit of this, a little bit of that. I like the salad bowl analogy as well. :)

Paula
01-14-2013, 09:06 AM
Where's the "I'm whatever works this week" :p

I'm with Oceanseve, but I voted Unit Studies because that one fires us up the most. We get more done when we do unit studies, especially if I can find a way for math and phonics to fit in. That way we have cool context to talk about without stripping away the necessary skills he needs to develop.

Teri
01-14-2013, 09:11 AM
I also chose unit studies. It was much more obvious for the 6 years we used MBTP, but even this year that describes us the best.
Interest led unit studies. My kids still want everything to tie together.

Mum
01-14-2013, 09:26 AM
Montessori for the wee one with the intention to continue with that tradition through his entire elementary lessons.

Unit studies with lots of Montessori materials for the older one.

WindSong
01-14-2013, 09:45 AM
The salad bowl analogy works to describe us as well. My kids learn best by doing so they love hands-on interest led projects. My dd would love Montessori, so I need to research this more. We all enjoy CM style nature study, living books and narration.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
01-14-2013, 10:52 AM
I voted "eclectic." I'd love to say Charlotte Mason, but we probably don't qualify because we dropped narration (my son hated it) and we can't even manage to drag ourselves into the back yard most days, much less do regular outdoor time.

I like "eclectic." Nobody can tell me I'm doing it wrong. :)

Riceball_Mommy
01-14-2013, 11:28 AM
I went with eclectic, I think we are taking a semi classical approach to history, though we may have started a bit late. I really like the starting with the beginning and going up through history and then starting over again going in more depth. I like textbooks, and hands on projects, and since sometimes I'm kind of grabbing things together I'm not exactly sure where any of it would fit.

Mslksdh
01-14-2013, 12:00 PM
We are in the eclectic group as well. Though I like the stop trying to label me group. HA! While Child-led learning is our main focus, as a former Montessori teacher I can't help but teach my own children in my interpretation of that method/style. We are also on occasion un-schoolers. And yes whatever works today.

BakedAk
01-14-2013, 12:14 PM
I put "eclectic" but I gotta say, there should be a choice for "f-ing clueless."

neobunny
01-15-2013, 08:05 AM
I guess I'm Traditionalist because I'll be using Core Knowledge as a spine. Right now I'm just doing the bare minimum to get Bat Boy ready since he's only 4 & has HFA. He needs help with fine motor skills & has a speech delay so I'm working with that right now. I'll also be trying out Starfall to see if he's ready to learn phonics, which I think he is since he already knows his letters very well. I was thinking about sending him to preschool then homeschool starting in kindergarten, but I've been reading that kids with autism don't learn by imitation at all, so there's no point in wasting my time with that. If he's not gonna learn to make friends by being with a big group of kids then why put him thru that? That was one of the reasons I was thinking of putting him in preschool. And of course the therapists he sees from the school department made it sound like he would definitely learn social skills thru PS but everything I've been reading says otherwise.

Batgirl
01-15-2013, 11:02 AM
I guess I'm Traditionalist because I'll be using Core Knowledge as a spine. Right now I'm just doing the bare minimum to get Bat Boy ready since he's only 4 & has HFA. He needs help with fine motor skills & has a speech delay so I'm working with that right now. I'll also be trying out Starfall to see if he's ready to learn phonics, which I think he is since he already knows his letters very well. I was thinking about sending him to preschool then homeschool starting in kindergarten, but I've been reading that kids with autism don't learn by imitation at all, so there's no point in wasting my time with that. If he's not gonna learn to make friends by being with a big group of kids then why put him thru that? That was one of the reasons I was thinking of putting him in preschool. And of course the therapists he sees from the school department made it sound like he would definitely learn social skills thru PS but everything I've been reading says otherwise.

It really depends on the child. Kids with ASD tend not to learn as much by imitation as NT kids do, but they still learn.Your son's temperament matters as much as his diagnosis. Preschool may or may not help, it depends on the school. If the staff is knowledgeable about ASD, they'll know to teach your son explicitly what to do, at least in a special education preschool.

For example, my son is outgoing and loves groups of kids. When we go to a park he always finds someone to play with, in spite of his social immaturity. By and large, the developmental preschool run by the school district was a wonderful experience for him, and while he didn't exactly learn how to make conversation, he learned how to be with people, that there were rules he needed to follow and about certain social expectations. (The friends issue tends not to come up until they are a bit older--and depends on the child.) In short, in a benign school environment, they can learn how to "get along".

The thing about "social skills" is that kids don't tend to learn them unless they are motivated, which depends on the kid. My son is highly motivated but a lot of kids on the spectrum just don't care that much. They like doing their own thing. So the trick is to find a group & therapist appropriate for your son, then determine whether your son is in a position to benefit from it.

Anyhow, good luck and sorry to hijack the thread. Carry on!

neobunny
01-15-2013, 11:43 AM
Thanks for the insight Batgirl. I understand what your saying. I'm just not sure if I can find the right kind of preschool for him where I live without having to travel. North Carolina has a preK program that, if you qualify, you can send your child to preschool for free. We qualify because my son has an IEP already & gets some services thru the school system. I have an idea what to expect with the free preschools around here since I used to pick up my neighbor's kid from school & last year he was in preK, & I wasn't impressed. My neighbor's kid was a bit of a jerk to my son when I used to babysit him. How many kids would be like that to him in school? He's social butterfly but he doesn't understand when to stop playing when others have stopped. Or stop talking. Man can that kid's mouth go! And he's LOUD! Maybe he would be good in the right preschool, but I don't know if I can find it. I'd rather just keep him home & find a playground so he can get the playtime with other kids that he loves.

And so this isn't totally off topic; I plan on using Core Knowledge because it's cheap, it gives me a really good idea of what to teach each year, and I can get just about every book I'll need from the library. If I can't find the same book they recommend, I can easily sub it out. I found out of print copy of a monthly guide that will help alot to plan out what I need to do. I hoping that once he starts speaking better (and I believe it's only a matter of time because he has made great improvement in the last 6-7 months) it'll get easier for him to learn what he needs to know, social & academic.

Batgirl
01-15-2013, 12:38 PM
Well, it sounds like you're on top of it. I was lucky--the District preschool I used had 12-14 kids, with one teacher and 3 aides. Three of the kids were NT peers. Of the three teachers Batman had, one was poor and two were wonderful. The last year he was there he had a teacher who had been trained in the TEACCH (something like that) method and she was outstanding. That year, Batman had zero behavior problems in class.

But it does all depend on who you get and the kind of support that is provided.

Ha, ha. Both my kids are loud. I've been working on it for years, with minimal success.

Core Knowledge sounds good. Cheap is definitely good. We are faithful acolytes of our local library, even though we use Calvert.

Jeni
01-15-2013, 07:34 PM
We are online learners and that wasn't an option. Eclectic or traditional I guess.

RTB
01-19-2013, 10:07 PM
We follow CM for the most part (minus the Christianity). I can see us evolving to a more child directed learning path over time, esp as my children age. However, I will always encourage a strong focus on math and science.

farrarwilliams
01-19-2013, 10:18 PM
The results of this are pretty much exactly what I expected, by the way. We're overwhelmingly eclectic... yet I kind of like the people who really owned a method. There's something cool about that.

JinxieFox
01-20-2013, 07:57 AM
I just realized I answered the poll, but never commented. I'm blaming Mommy Brain. :p Classical through and through, but I embrace a CM approach to how I implement lessons.

jess
01-22-2013, 08:28 PM
I call mine CM-inspired ADHD-Classical Unschooling.

Rainefox
01-22-2013, 09:26 PM
Well, I know what I'd LIKE To be (classical).....but the darn kids just wouldn't cooperate and learn that way. I think our actual approach can be best defined as the 'stories and puzzles' approach. We read a lot of stories and books, both aloud and independently. We read fiction and nonfiction. We read stories about history and historical figures. We read stories about science and scientists. I can't stick with a packaged lit curriculum though because the kids are really picky about their stories and sometimes I have to keep trying to find good stories for what I'm trying to teach. They aren't much into hand-on stuff or experiments though we do those as there is interest. Then we have puzzles....math puzzles, logic puzzles, word puzzles, you name it. They love puns and analogies. They can't do dictation or spell worth a darn. Saxon is apparently the math of choice and Hake is the grammar of choice, but not my choice (and I really didn't want to give in to either of them, I wanted Beast Academy and MCT, but what can you do?). They are mildly gifted and dysgraphic. I'm learning more about project-based and interest-led types of learning and trying to encourage them in that direction (although that is a bit scary for ME). They tend to score well on standardized testing and I'm not sure if that's good or bad. They are certainly interesting to talk to.....

mntnmom
01-26-2013, 12:04 PM
I *want* to be a little more classical/Charlotte Mason in my choices. But I need more of the legwork done for me... so I'm more traditionalist than I want to be.

albeto
01-26-2013, 09:29 PM
Unschooler here. I imagine the rest of you would label me a "radical unschooler."


so rad!

http://www.sherv.net/cm/emo/dancing/rocking-stickman-smiley-emoticon.gif (http://www.sherv.net/rocking.stickman-emoticon-3350.html)