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zette
01-09-2013, 09:37 AM
Does anyone here have a child in a hybrid homeschool charter -- where they attend a classroom 2 or 3 days a week, and the school sets the assignments to be done on the "at home" days?

I have just found a tiny special ed school in our area that is designed for kids with Aspergers. Instead of jumping in with the school 5 days a week, we are looking at having him attend 2 days a week and doing "homeschool" the other 3, basically following the hybrid model. Attending this school would give us a way to get the behavioral and social skills therapy he needs (and that I'm struggling to piece together on my own), and a long trial period would let us make sure it's really the right place for him.

My favorite thing about homeschooling is that I get to pick the curriculum, which I would lose with the hybrid model. I'm mostly a school-at-home person anyway, so far at least. Just curious to hear others' experiences with the hybrid model.

blasphemoushomemaker
01-14-2013, 04:45 AM
No, but I wish we did. Just two days a week would really help me have more time to clean my house! My state (washington) JUST finally legalized charter schools. We do, though, have parent partnership programs, where parents can send their kids to just one or more classes at a physical school, maybe just get them involved in a language or music class. They're just all based mainly outside of the city for the convenience of county kids so it's a long drive if we participated. I'm hoping new charter schools will offer that kind of flexibility. The parents that I do know who use it all love it.

crunchynerd
01-14-2013, 08:31 AM
I am glad to maintain autonomy over our kids' education as a family matter, and therefore won't be answering to an external organization or the State more than the required yearly letter stating we passed our annual review. Housework is something they have to learn how to do along the way, anyway, so I have them work with me to get chores done, most of the time.

Paula
01-14-2013, 09:15 AM
We are with a charter in Northern California that supplies and perhaps suggests curricula, but I was able to chose which to take home. While using it, we are able to see what works for us and keep and drop what we like. Although there are some guidelines, we are able to set the schedule and the assignments.

What I love is that they offer classes, but they are FUN, and the teachers are amazing. It's not always a break because some classes are parent-child, but I love that we can both be "the learners" sometimes.

I think what you've described would be a nice middle-of-the-road approach. He would get the specialized therapy he needs, the freedom and comfort to learn at home, and added exposure to other kids he can relate to. Once you're in, maybe they would allow you to change up the assignments and curricula. I say, go for the trial run!

Accidental Homeschooler
01-14-2013, 12:31 PM
In our state we can use the schools for classes and extracurricular activities. My dd takes a math class at the high school and we will use it for other classes in the future. It has been helpful to have that option for us. I am not familiar with the type of program you are describing. It isn't something that is available here. I might try it if it were, with my younger dd.

blasphemoushomemaker
01-14-2013, 10:56 PM
I should rephrase that. I'm not super-mom and would like some frikkin' time to myself.

Sweden
01-24-2013, 10:12 AM
A friend of mine sends her children to a similarly-styled school in California. I don't know the details, but she absolutely loves it. Her frame of reference is that she likes having her children around, but is not comfortable with establishing and then fully teaching a curriculum. The one subject in which she is comfortable is the arts and she has extra time to focus on that with her children.

Mrs. Apple
01-24-2013, 09:01 PM
There's a school like this in my area--I think they call it a "university model" school. It looks pretty cool, lots of organized sports and fine arts. But it's also stark-raving Christian, and therefor not a good fit for us. Bummer.

rueyn
01-25-2013, 07:39 AM
I love this idea in theory, but would have to see specifically what the 'school' is offering. One of the biggest problems I'm dealing with lately is a lack of time to myself. Ds's grandma usually has him one day a week, but with the holidays and illnesses, it's been nearly two months since that's happened. I'm going a little batty :_lol:

Is there a way to find out if a state has one of these programs? I did a search for "hybrid homeschool charter", and nothing came up.

blasphemoushomemaker
01-27-2013, 01:45 AM
Ours is labeled "parent partnership program"

CloverBee&Reverie
04-16-2013, 10:45 AM
These hybrid programs here in CA are very popular and run the gamut in how far-reaching they extend into a HSing family's life. One close friend is enrolled through one, they provide her with copious amounts of curriculum- some more homeschooly and some traditional textbook, she opted out of state standardized testing, she meets with them every 6weeks and has carte Blanche with what she teaches her kids. They have optional classes if she wants to enroll her kids in them. I know there's gotta be a catch somewhere, but from the outside it seems an enticing setup. As a homeschooling parent I make every decision with the thought of "is this best for my student?". If this hybrid setup works for your family and especially for your child, then go forward and don't get your brain wrapped up in the labels: homeschooler, kinda homeschooler, hybrid homeschooler, part time public schooler, etc.

atomicgirl
04-16-2013, 12:39 PM
My 10 yo DD (2E--AS, ADD) attended a hybrid program for 4 years before we decided to homeschool. In the beginning it was great. She went 4 mornings a week and we had a lot of leeway in what and how she was taught. The teacher we had for the first 2 years really let us take the lead on work modification and enrichment, and worked with us on effective classroom modifications. There were problems, but most were manageable with a little effort. We assumed we'd stay there through middle school (and high school if the district ever approved the program). It was nice to have the services and support of an expert teacher, but still have the time with her that we needed in order to guide her education ourselves.

Teri
04-16-2013, 12:52 PM
There are several University Model schools here, but they are all very religious.

Lazy Jane
04-16-2013, 03:18 PM
We use a charter like that. But it is very flexible. The onsite classes are optional and they don't even take attendance. So max, you could be in school 4 hours a day, two days a week, 8 months out of the year. There are two classes a day, lunch and recess between. I have heard with my and other charters, it often depends on the teacher as to how much control you have over curriculum. We get to choose our curriculum, and they generally work with you to write up assignments...they don't dictate what you do, just the subjects you cover. I didn't realize how much freedom we actually have with the charter (this is our first year) until about a week ago, and I wrote about it in my last blog post. "Homeschooling" Single (working title) (http://homeschoolsingle.blogspot.com/)

I really depends on your overseeing teacher, school, district, and state. But the above is one experience.

rosey4exclaim
04-21-2013, 02:53 PM
I did a program like this when I was in 7th grade. Elective-type classes were offered two days a week (Spanish, French, Art, etc.), and core classes like History and English were done at home. We also had one part of class each week for a sort of show and tell. I loved it! I couldn't go every day every week (our only transportation was a motorcycle and it did rain and snow), but I loved it when I could.

Avalon
04-21-2013, 05:42 PM
One of the school boards around here is planning something like that for this coming fall. I couldn't make it to the information night, but a friend told me that the kids basically attend 2 full days per week, they have regular classes with regular teachers, and they cover the bare bones of the Alberta curriculum. They offer homework and extra assignments, but it's up to you if you do them or not, and what you do with the rest of your time is totally up to you.

Normally, I wouldn't even think of it, but with life being the rollercoaster that it is lately, at least I could have 2 days a week to focus on my mother and my job, and know that the kids are occupied somewhat productively.

GrowingFamily
04-22-2013, 01:10 AM
We just stopped our hybrid experiment. My son was going to kindergarten 3 days a week and homeschooling the other 2 days. It sounded like the best of both worlds. Time with his friends and away from his brother who is in HS fulltime (13 years old). But it was soooo hard to take him those 3 days. It always seemed to be the day we wanted to go to an event or the only nice day that week for a zoo trip would be a school day. And once he knew what it was like skipping the morning rush to the bus it got harder. His teacher and I worked together on lessons and maybe that was nice. So far I like it better on my own.

Jennifer

modmom
04-25-2013, 06:06 PM
I'm considering this for my DS. The one I'm looking at doesn't seem very flexible as far as the curriculum, but I'm going to call and see if we can work something out.

ItoLina
04-25-2013, 09:32 PM
I am using a homeschool-charter hybrid. They give me $1500 a year to spend on any curriculum I choose from a list of 30 different online stores including Rainbow Resource, Lakeshore Learning, and DickBlick Art Supply. They also give me an iPad for the year and $30 to spend on apps. I get annual passes to out planetarium and the national parks, and they pay for a number of approved extra curricular activities, including music lessons, gymnastics, martial arts, etc.

in return, I have to turn in a "home report" each quarter, which basically just lists our successes and things to work on for each of the 4 core subjects, as well as 2 work samples for each core subject. My son also has to sign up for 2 online classes a month. (If we lived pn Oahu he would be required to attend 2 face-to-face classes, but since we are pn one of the outer Islands, we can do the virtually). Each class lasts about 30 minutes, and they have a short homework assignment that they have to complete related to the class. I get to pick which classes he attends each month and the topics are listed in advance and I sign up online.

I have been really happy with it. I feel like I get a lot out of it and it is well worth the little hoops I have to jump through to get it. I don't know if I would do it is I had to give up the freedom to choose the curriculum I want though. Maintaining that freedom of choice was key to my decision to try it out.

modmom
04-27-2013, 08:13 AM
I am using a homeschool-charter hybrid. They give me $1500 a year to spend on any curriculum I choose from a list of 30 different online stores including Rainbow Resource, Lakeshore Learning, and DickBlick Art Supply. They also give me an iPad for the year and $30 to spend on apps. I get annual passes to out planetarium and the national parks, and they pay for a number of approved extra curricular activities, including music lessons, gymnastics, martial arts, etc.

in return, I have to turn in a "home report" each quarter, which basically just lists our successes and things to work on for each of the 4 core subjects, as well as 2 work samples for each core subject. My son also has to sign up for 2 online classes a month. (If we lived pn Oahu he would be required to attend 2 face-to-face classes, but since we are pn one of the outer Islands, we can do the virtually). Each class lasts about 30 minutes, and they have a short homework assignment that they have to complete related to the class. I get to pick which classes he attends each month and the topics are listed in advance and I sign up online.

I have been really happy with it. I feel like I get a lot out of it and it is well worth the little hoops I have to jump through to get it. I don't know if I would do it is I had to give up the freedom to choose the curriculum I want though. Maintaining that freedom of choice was key to my decision to try it out.
I would try a set up like this, in a heartbeat. The loss of freedom when choosing the curriculum is a big turn off in the one I was wanting to try.