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ItoLina
12-28-2012, 02:31 PM
I found this (http://www.lexile.com/) website where you can find the lexile score of books and search for other books with a similar score. I have used it by putting in the title of a book that is at a good level for my ds, then I look at the lexile score for that book. Then I search for books with that same lexile score. Then I look for those titles at our local library. I have found this SO helpful in checking out books that my son is able to practice reading.

I hope it is also helpful for others!

farrarwilliams
12-28-2012, 03:23 PM
They can be useful, but I advise not getting too tied into lexile levels. They don't always reflect every aspect of a book. I've read about schools where you're required to read at a certain lexile level depending on your reading ability to ensure that you're reading "good" for you books. But Twilight has a lexile of 720 while Of Mice and Men has a lexile of 630. So some kids would be "allowed" to read Twilight and not Of Mice and Men. And in the case of Twilight, part of the larger lexile is clearly about poor grammar. Just saying.

So, loose guide. :D

ItoLina
12-28-2012, 08:13 PM
They can be useful, but I advise not getting too tied into lexile levels. They don't always reflect every aspect of a book. I've read about schools where you're required to read at a certain lexile level depending on your reading ability to ensure that you're reading "good" for you books. But Twilight has a lexile of 720 while Of Mice and Men has a lexile of 630. So some kids would be "allowed" to read Twilight and not Of Mice and Men. And in the case of Twilight, part of the larger lexile is clearly about poor grammar. Just saying.

So, loose guide. :D

Wow! That is good to know. So far it has worked out well for us, but I haven't been at it long (just a month or so) and have been looking at pretty low level books.

crunchynerd
12-28-2012, 09:33 PM
I got pretty intensely interested in lexile levels when my always-homeschooled daughter was interested in trying school, as she was turning 8. Turned out she changed her mind, and we were fine with that, but in the mean time, I went kind of frantic trying to find out exactly what you were looking for, so I could see what level she was at. I arrived ultimately at the conclusion that it was pointless after trying so hard to get why certain books were at one level, and others which seemed a much more elevated reading level to me, were at a lower lexile. It made no sense in many cases.

I also checked out leveled readers and they were so horribly dull that neither I nor my daughter could stand them for very long, ANY of them, no matter the subject.

When my daughter's near-school experience was history, I was grateful not to have to worry about leveled readers or lexiles, any more, as was she. But I am glad you found a searchable database (and where's the link to that, anyway? I'd like to go see it too!). It seemed like to me, when I went searching, that they wanted to keep the secret formulae out of lay parent hands or something, because I couldn't find much! So thanks for sharing. :)

ItoLina
12-29-2012, 03:23 AM
I got pretty intensely interested in lexile levels when my always-homeschooled daughter was interested in trying school, as she was turning 8. Turned out she changed her mind, and we were fine with that, but in the mean time, I went kind of frantic trying to find out exactly what you were looking for, so I could see what level she was at. I arrived ultimately at the conclusion that it was pointless after trying so hard to get why certain books were at one level, and others which seemed a much more elevated reading level to me, were at a lower lexile. It made no sense in many cases.

I also checked out leveled readers and they were so horribly dull that neither I nor my daughter could stand them for very long, ANY of them, no matter the subject.

When my daughter's near-school experience was history, I was grateful not to have to worry about leveled readers or lexiles, any more, as was she. But I am glad you found a searchable database (and where's the link to that, anyway? I'd like to go see it too!). It seemed like to me, when I went searching, that they wanted to keep the secret formulae out of lay parent hands or something, because I couldn't find much! So thanks for sharing. :)

I just searched for a book at the top of the page where it said "quick book search". Then I went to this link Find a Book - Lexile Framework for Reading (http://www.lexile.com/fab/) to search for what ever level books I wanted. I hope that helps.


Also, just to clarify, I really don't care what level my ds is at, I just want an easy way to check out real library books that my son can read and will enjoy. I have had little success with leveled readers. They are just boring to my ds. He wants to read "real" books so badly, but just isn't yet to the point that we can just go grab any book out of the kids section and read it. I am going to be very bummed if this whole lexile web site turns out to be that inconsistent and unreliable. Someone really needs to make some kind of reliable list of books at progressively more difficult levels.

Starkspack
12-29-2012, 06:26 AM
Thanks for this link! It is helpful - I, like you, am trying to find appropriate books for DD that are about the same reading level as the readers she is reading. This has proven difficult. I also agree that the leveled readers are dull - both DD and I are so unenthusiastic about selecting them at the library!

Mum
12-30-2012, 10:14 AM
Thanks for the link! I think these types of lists can be extra helpful for parents teaching reluctant readers. It takes a LONG time to skim through books that are 1. Going to be interesting enough that my son will even consider opening it up and 2. Going to be easy enough for him to read that he'll stick with it.

I think parents with kids who are avid readers may take the need for lists like this for granted.

ItoLina
12-30-2012, 02:01 PM
Thanks for the link! I think these types of lists can be extra helpful for parents teaching reluctant readers. It takes a LONG time to skim through books that are 1. Going to be interesting enough that my son will even consider opening it up and 2. Going to be easy enough for him to read that he'll stick with it.

I think parents with kids who are avid readers may take the need for lists like this for granted.

This is exactly what it has been like for me. When we find a good book that is interesting to him AND at that "perfect" level, he is so much more willing to read, and he enjoys it. If not, he just gets bored or frustrated very quickly. I have been trying hard to find ways to make sure his experiences with reading are positive and fun.

farrarwilliams
12-30-2012, 02:22 PM
It's very true... And I think the earlier in learning a reader is, the more useful Lexile levels and DRA reading levels and other such things can be.

Still though - my experience with my kids and with teaching older kids, both voracious readers and reluctant, has been that the subject and style of the book hooks a kid more than the reading level - even though hitting a kid with the right level will obviously help. The first longer series that BalletBoy read independently was WAY ahead of him. He's not a voracious reader, he just persisted with it for several months slowly.