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SherryZoned
06-22-2010, 10:36 PM
Sorry if I am posting in the wrong place!

I need to teach my 5 year old to read. The truth is I have not a clue on how to do it besides reading to him and trust me that is not working!

What do you suggest? I have looked at Hooked on Phonics but want to see what else is out there.

StartingOver
06-22-2010, 10:50 PM
Hooked on phonics has pretty good books, but the phonics it's self requires way to many sight words for my taste.

I highly recommend and love Ordinary Parents Guide to Reading. http://www.welltrainedmind.com/store/the-ordinary-parent-s-guide-to-teaching-reading-paperback.html It isn't fun or pretty, but is very complete, and it gets the job done. You will need some beginning reader books if you don't have any. Many people get Bob Books, I use Sonlight K readers, and I Can Read books. That is if you want to teach phonics which I highly recommend.

If you want to use a sight reading approach, I recommend I See Sam books. www.iseesam.com/

Other choices are Phonics Pathways, Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, McGuffey Readers, or Saxon Phonics. ( I am sure there are others. )

Great info on these sites...
http://www.thephonicspage.org/Phonics%20Lsns/phonicslsnslinks.html
http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/webstersway.html
http://phonicsfirstsyllablesalways.wordpress.com/

Sarbare0704
06-22-2010, 10:55 PM
hmm this may be a dumb question but what is the difference of sight words vs phonics? I have never actually heard of sight words until recently. Phonics is just sounding words out right?

jessicalb
06-22-2010, 11:02 PM
At 5 I wouldn't worry too much! Lots of kids read a lot later than that. Whatever approach you use, take it easy. :)

SherryZoned
06-22-2010, 11:06 PM
Thanks everyone!

I am only worried about it because he is driving me nuts having me read everything to him! LOL So I am going to say hey you need to learn to read too. I can not read to you all day long! LOL

Now if he really has issues then I will put it off and do other stuff..

Ok he wants to read his video games! LOL

StartingOver
06-22-2010, 11:07 PM
hmm this may be a dumb question but what is the difference of sight words vs phonics? I have never actually heard of sight words until recently. Phonics is just sounding words out right?

Never a dumb question. YES ! Phonics is decoding words, sounding out the letters S. A. T, to blend them together to make sat. Phonics also helps with spelling.

Sight reading is also called Whole Word Method, you look at a word and memorize it. I don't feel that you can memorize every word in the English language. So the best method is to teach phonics first, then when you child can say the sound of the letters, then blend them together. He can read, the more he reads the more familiar the patterns are to him, so that he builds fluency.

Sarbare0704
06-22-2010, 11:20 PM
alright thanks! I guess phonics is just common sense to me LOL cause that is how I have been teaching Lucy already :) I agree it seems like phonics would make things easier for spelling too!

MamaB2C
06-22-2010, 11:25 PM
I am using the following to teach my DS4 to read

The Reading Lesson (http://www.readinglesson.com/)
Starfall (http://www.starfall.com)
The Bob Books (http://www.amazon.com/Bob-Books-Set-Beginning-Readers/dp/0439845009/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277259833&sr=8-1)

I also do non-decodable high frequency words as sight words (eg; said, is, was), sound blends, and word groupings on the white board as well as just reading signs or movie covers or what have you.

Best of luck!

StartingOver
06-22-2010, 11:27 PM
alright thanks! I guess phonics is just common sense to me LOL cause that is how I have been teaching Lucy already :) I agree it seems like phonics would make things easier for spelling too!

Over the years that public school systems change from whole word to phonics and back. Or as TWTM calls it, parts to whole ( phonics ) or whole to parts ( whole word ). There has been tons of research showing that children who are taught phonics also pick up sight words as they build fluency. Some children can naturally pick up the phonics patterns, but not all. Using both methods is preferred, of course starting with phonics first. There was also inventive spelling used around the same time, which is spell it as it sounds. Phonics rules can go a long way towards spelling correctly when the rules are learned.

If interested you might read The Dumbing Down of American Education. It can be found online free.

jessicalb
06-22-2010, 11:33 PM
I think phonics is definitely the way to go! The only adult I know who was raised with a total whole word approach still has trouble with new words and spelling. :/

SherryZoned
06-22-2010, 11:35 PM
I have a hard time with pronunciation! LOL Only because I do use phonics and let me tell you some words are now spoken how they sound.. I think I will definitely do phonics and some site words.. Just do a mix of both!

StartingOver
06-22-2010, 11:37 PM
I think phonics is definitely the way to go! The only adult I know who was raised with a total whole word approach still has trouble with new words and spelling. :/


I have two step daughter that I had to teach to read in 8th and 9th grade. They had fallen through the whole word approach crack. They were tested to read at the level of a 2nd grader in highschool. Within 4 months of starting phonics instruction, they were reading at high school level.

StartingOver
06-22-2010, 11:41 PM
I have a hard time with pronunciation! LOL Only because I do use phonics and let me tell you some words are now spoken how they sound.. I think I will definitely do phonics and some site words.. Just do a mix of both!

Oh of course, you can't sound out every single word. But you can the majority. A base of phonics followed by practice and learning the high frequency words would be wonderful. Quince will be 4 the end of this month, has completed phonics instruction, he is just starting to improve on fluency now. So we are looking at high frequency words.

We will soon be starting All About Spelling, to review and apply the rules to spelling.

Snoopy
06-22-2010, 11:44 PM
Ok he wants to read his video games! LOL Oh man, I remember like it was yesterday when I bought Alex (my oldest, now 16) a Pokemon game for his Gameboy, not realizing that he needed to know how to read to play the game. Arrgh, I lasted about 2 days and then I told him he just needed to put it away until he knew how to read on his own. I know, mean mommy. He was in p.s. so I didn't get involved too much in his learning how to read, but I made him practice every night, reading library books outloud to me (he would read one and then I would read one and so on and so forth). He was very excited when he finally could play his Pokemon game (I still needed to help with some words, but for the most part he was able to play on his own). With my subsequent kids, the rule became that they couldn't play any video games if they weren't able to read the instructions. So instead they used Reader Rabbit (where the instructions are read to you, there are several grade levels), or similar computer programs. Once they knew how to read, they moved on to the real games. Again, we read A LOT. I would read to them every night, for about 30-45 minutes, before they went to bed, and as they progressed, I would have them sound out letters and then words for me and little by little, I would have them read more and more of the words until they finally read the whole book on their own (easy readers). But even then, I still read outloud to them. It is very important to read outloud to your children because they pick up fluency from you too (how to read a story at a regular pace, respecting the punctuation, intonation, etc.). We had lots of fun with it and it relaxed them before going to bed (and it was cuddling time too!)

For Noah (my only homeschooled kid), I was determined that he would know how to read by the time he was 5 because 1) My mom had taught me how to read by the time I started Kindergarten (when I was 5) so I knew it was possible and2) my personal opinion is you miss out on a lot of things if you don't know how to read (like playing video games, well at my house anyway!). I used a mix of resources: Starfall.com; Headsprout.com;the Letter Factory DVD -- a must!, and then the Word Factory DVD, and finally the BOB Books sets; He read the 1st set of BOB books and about half of the 2nd set and then he was off reading library books (leveled readers) and we never looked back. Back when he was learning to decode words, we would sound out traffic signs and store signs together every time we'd go out. I would sound out the names of foods on the packages at the grocery store. Soon he was imitating me. I gave plenty of encouragement and we used incentive charts to track how much "reading" he was doing so he could earn a little treat.

So yes, he knew how to read by the time he turned 5 because he was reading BOB books at that time. The "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" method didn't work for me because I don't know the English phonetic alphabet and I didn't see the point in learning it so I dropped that after lesson 3. However I kept some of their methodology, i.e. following the sounds with my fingers and then making a sweeping movement under the word to continue linking all the sounds together until a word emerged -- that really helped Noah make the transition from sounds to syllables to words.

Good luck!

schwartzkari
06-22-2010, 11:49 PM
I am a huge fan of Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons. My daughter is currently on lesson 55 and she now takes the book from me and does the exercises on her own. She could barely read two words when we started the book and now she is reading things left and right and suprises me every day. I agree with Nathalie, the book is not for everyone. I actually had to take a week and study the first chapter and the parent directions so that I could understand what "direct instruction" was all about. For my daughter, I'm extremely impressed with it and I plan to try it out with my son when he's 5. My daughter will be 6 in August and I fully expect she'll be reading on her own by then.

Also, love LOVE Starfall. Their boardgame "StarFall Speedway" is excellent for learning sight words.

SherryZoned
06-22-2010, 11:50 PM
LOL Natalie.. Yes my 11 year old is a pokemon Fiend! So of course my 5 year old does it too.. Well I got frusterated because my 5 year old wanted to learn in PREK and they just were teaching the bare basics..but trying to teach him at home then go to school was to hard on him..then he would get board. So we tabled that! Now that we have adjusted for the past 3 months of everyone being home together and a more relaxed household we are about ready to get down to business.. I expect my 2 year old to learn to read quickly he is already sounding out letters, and loves the leap frog DVDS.

Busygoddess
06-23-2010, 12:09 AM
For phonics/reading instruction we used:
Explode the Code - we chose the workbooks because they provide writing practice as well as phonics/reading, there is also an online version, though
Starfall (http://www.starfall.com/) - we stick with just the free stuff - printables & the interactive online stuff
PBS Island (http://pbskids.org/read/)
Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons
The Leapfrog DVDs - these are fantastic

Jay still plays on Starfall & PBS Island because he finds them fun. We're finishing off the Explode the Code books this year, for review & to make sure we didn't miss anything. We always have plenty of reading material available to the kids. We let them read pretty much whatever they want, with very few restrictions. I read to them (not with any real consistency) & read with them (I read a sentence/paragraph/page, then they read one). We have always been regulars at the public library & the kids check out books every week
That's how both my kids learned to read, except Dea learned without the internet or any curriculum. Now, they both love to read & are reading well above grade level, because I kept it fun, light, and went at their pace. Let him guide you. Check your local library for books like 100 Easy Lessons & Ordinary Parent's Guide. If they have them, you can try them out for a few lessons to see if they work for your son.

laundrycrisis
06-23-2010, 07:48 AM
I am using the following to teach my DS4 to read

The Reading Lesson (http://www.readinglesson.com/)
Starfall (http://www.starfall.com)
The Bob Books (http://www.amazon.com/Bob-Books-Set-Beginning-Readers/dp/0439845009/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277259833&sr=8-1)

I also do non-decodable high frequency words as sight words (eg; said, is, was), sound blends, and word groupings on the white board as well as just reading signs or movie covers or what have you.

Best of luck!

For our oldest I used all of these same materials. I really like The Reading Lesson for parent instruction, although I didn't actually sit down with my child and that book at the same time much...but the order of letters and visual clues presented in the book were helpful. I also use the Leapfrog DVDs...the first one is Letter Factory. It has a cute story to help the child remember the sound of each letter. The other DVDs in the series are Talking Words Factory, Code Word Caper, and Storybook Factory.

For our second, who will be five in September, I know he will want books that are more colorful than the Bob Books, so I ordered the set of beginning readers from Starfall.com for him. They are little word family books and we can watch the animated versions of the stories on their website along with using the books. So I will use the order of letters and the visual clues from The Reading Lesson, the Starfall readers and website, and the Leapfrog DVDs, all for phonics.

Learning sight words that don't follow the phonics rules, and to read high-frequency words without decoding them every time, is a different type of learning. For those I will use the lists of Dolsch words from the Mrs. Perkins website (http://www.mrsperkins.com/dolch.htm). For reading practice, I am using the Elson Readers (http://laundrycrisis.wordpress.com/2010/05/05/elson-readers-free-links/) from the 1920s. I found links to all of them for free on Google Books.

Snoopy
06-23-2010, 10:29 AM
Learning sight words that don't follow the phonics rules, and to read high-frequency words without decoding them every time, is a different type of learning. For those I will use the lists of Dolsch words from the Mrs. Perkins website (http://www.mrsperkins.com/dolch.htm). For reading practice, I am using the Elson Readers (http://laundrycrisis.wordpress.com/2010/05/05/elson-readers-free-links/) from the 1920s. I found links to all of them for free on Google Books.

This reminds me that for Sight Words, I had a Sight Words Bingo game. I could have sworn it was a DK game but I can't find mention of it online so I must have been mistaken. Anyway, there are several of those games on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=sight+word+bingo+&x=6&y=21).

hjdong
06-23-2010, 11:56 AM
O.k., I hate to be the dissenting voice here, and I'm not completely disagreeing, but there is a small portion of the population (which seems to run high in my family, myself, my sister, and my son - odd because none of us are related to each other genetically) learn to read better holistically, which is where the idea of whole language initially came from. It is a small portion of the population and they tend to be early readers. If you try to teach them to read phonetically, it just won't make sense. However, (and this is generalized) they will seem to absorb new words.

On the other hand, phonetic instruction is useful once they have mastered reading, to help both with spelling and unknown words. DS is almost 8, reads at a 5th grade level, and is just beginning to "get" phonics.

I just thought I would throw this out there, in case anyone has a kid who "fits" this.

warramra
06-23-2010, 06:03 PM
O.k., I hate to be the dissenting voice here, and I'm not completely disagreeing, but there is a small portion of the population (which seems to run high in my family, myself, my sister, and my son - odd because none of us are related to each other genetically) learn to read better holistically, which is where the idea of whole language initially came from. It is a small portion of the population and they tend to be early readers. If you try to teach them to read phonetically, it just won't make sense. However, (and this is generalized) they will seem to absorb new words.

On the other hand, phonetic instruction is useful once they have mastered reading, to help both with spelling and unknown words. DS is almost 8, reads at a 5th grade level, and is just beginning to "get" phonics.

I just thought I would throw this out there, in case anyone has a kid who "fits" this.

This is my experience too. I learned to read at a very early age with no phonics instruction, struggled with phonics in school even while reading 2-3 grade levels above my grade. I had a speech disorder that was later linked to an auditory processing disorder...I could not distinguish vowel and diphthong sounds. I would hear totally different sounds than what someone was saying. I love reading and am a great reader, thanks to the fact that I was allowed to read with out depending on phonics instruction.

I feel like I really killed my oldest dd's love of learning because I forced phonics instructions on her (I heard how I would ruin her if I didn't) and she struggled with it forever, felt 'stupid', etc. She took off with reading when we started working on high frequency words and doing parrot reading. This past year I used Blend Phonics (http://donpotter.net/Blend%20Phonics.htm) and The Webster Blue Back Speller (http://www.amazon.com/Original-Blue-Speller-Vocabulary-Warrior/dp/192924116X) to work on syllables instead of phonics and she just took off with her reading. But, she still harbors a lot of issues around the first couple of years I tried to teach reading. I still will not ask her to sound anything out, I just tell her the word if she asks. And, I'll be honest that her spelling is horrific...but that is another family trait from myself, dh, and my father. Like our own experiences we find that her spelling is improving the more she writes.

Dd7 had no problem with phonics, but with my previous experience with dd10 I made sure that we did high frequency words as soon as she could start sounding out basic three letter words and a lot of parrot reading. She reads great and enjoys it because there is no bad experience for her. This coming year I plan on going through the Webster Speller with her as well.

We are just starting direct reading instruction with dd5 at her request, and thanks to the Leap Frog DVDs, Starfall and T4L she has had basic phonics already. She is bored with phonetic readers, so we are jumping into high frequency words and parrot reading. She'll continue working on phonics review with T4L, but it is like she inherently knows how to sound most every word out.

So, from my experience is that flexibility is key. Phonics works for a large segment of the population, but not everybody.

Amy

elkhollow
06-23-2010, 07:19 PM
Not all English words follow the rules of phonics so I've always thought a combination of phonics and whole language was a solid choice.

Maybe somebody already mentioned this, but there are many places on the internet where you can get a copy of the Dolch sight words for each grade. Here's one: http://www.mrsperkins.com/dolch.htm
I made flashcards out of them and covered a few new ones and reviewed the old ones every day, beginning when they started to read. My 7 year old gets two sight words added to her usual 10 spelling words per week.

I have also used Starfall (I love that program and I love FREE), Bob Books, and Readinga-z.com.

FWIW, I believe in reading aloud for as long as you can, as often as you can, even long after they can read on their own. If they'll sit and listen for two hours, then I'll read for two hours. Housework can wait. If a little one brings me a book and asks me to read it when I'm elbow deep in bread dough, I'll clean up and go to the sofa. At our house each child has their own bookshelf full of their own books in their own room. There are shared books in the schoolroom. I started building their libraries early (when I was pregnant with my first I started going to Friends of the Library sales and Goodwill, looking for good books and I haven't stopped). The strategy must be working. Last night the two of them (ages 7 and 4) sat on the loveseat for about an hour quietly reading. I thought: "Look! Poster children for the homeschooling movement!" DH and I sat on the sofa reading our own books. Okay, I wasn't reading. I was enjoying the moment so much I just sat there and staring at them because they're usually hanging from the rafters, screaming, and running with scissors (that was a JOKE).

Busygoddess
06-23-2010, 08:05 PM
Not all English words follow the rules of phonics so I've always thought a combination of phonics and whole language was a solid choice.

Maybe somebody already mentioned this, but there are many places on the internet where you can get a copy of the Dolch sight words for each grade. Here's one: http://www.mrsperkins.com/dolch.htm
I made flashcards out of them and covered a few new ones and reviewed the old ones every day, beginning when they started to read. My 7 year old gets two sight words added to her usual 10 spelling words per week.

I have also used Starfall (I love that program and I love FREE), Bob Books, and Readinga-z.com.

FWIW, I believe in reading aloud for as long as you can, as often as you can, even long after they can read on their own. If they'll sit and listen for two hours, then I'll read for two hours. Housework can wait. If a little one brings me a book and asks me to read it when I'm elbow deep in bread dough, I'll clean up and go to the sofa. At our house each child has their own bookshelf full of their own books in their own room. There are shared books in the schoolroom. I started building their libraries early (when I was pregnant with my first I started going to Friends of the Library sales and Goodwill, looking for good books and I haven't stopped). The strategy must be working. Last night the two of them (ages 7 and 4) sat on the loveseat for about an hour quietly reading. I thought: "Look! Poster children for the homeschooling movement!" DH and I sat on the sofa reading our own books. Okay, I wasn't reading. I was enjoying the moment so much I just sat there and staring at them because they're usually hanging from the rafters, screaming, and running with scissors (that was a JOKE).

I agree that it should be a combination, and I use a combination with my kids. My combination is just more phonics focused, because that works for my kids. My daughter went to ps for Kinder. They focused much more on sight words than on phonics. My daughter was reading fluently before she started Kinder, so it didn't affect her. However, the rest of the class was struggling greatly. My son seems to naturally pick up sight words. Our focus has always been more phonics than sight words. As he learned to sound words out, he naturally deciphered sight words, as well. So, I prefer a phonics strong combination method to teaching reading. It has worked amazing well for both of my kids.

I also agree that you have to find what works for each child & go at their pace. The child should be the guide on this.

Riceball_Mommy
06-23-2010, 09:23 PM
I'm so happy that this thread is here. My daughter seems to want to learn how to read, and with her new interest in the Pixie Hollow game I'd like her to learn as well. We'll be starting our Kindergarten curriculum soon but I've been wanting to look into what I can do now and along with that. I'm going to look into a few of the links that were given through here. I think my daughter might benefit from a mix of sight words and phonics.

elkhollow
06-23-2010, 10:51 PM
Oh, yes, I had forgotten to mention Explode the Code! Those are fabulous and SO inexpensive! You can get those from amazon.com, I believe. I think for kindergarten you'd start at level 1. They have Before the Code,too, but I don't know what that is. We didn't use those.

Best of luck to you!

SherryZoned
06-24-2010, 12:12 PM
Thanks everyone much appreciated!

melgriffin03
06-24-2010, 07:04 PM
Ethan just finished Headsprout Early Reading. (http://www.headsprout.com/) He really enjoyed it and I couldn't believe how fast he went from being able to recognize certain words to reading Frog and Toad by himself.

Fiddler
06-24-2010, 07:20 PM
Seconding The Ordinary Parents' Guide, and (forty-) seconding Starfall.

About the whole word vs. phonics debate--I think both are really important. I used OPGTR to jumpstart my kids when they were ready (JaneG.--right around 6.5-7; Jazzman, my especially right-brained learner--around 8) and then they took off. I'll give OPGTR a try with J.J. (6 in Nov.) soon, and put it away if need be until later. Jazz wasn't reading fluently until around age nine, but then went from level 1-2 readers to the whole Harry Potter series in less than six months.

Family lore says I "magically" learned to read when I was three, but I had phonics in 1st & 2nd grade and it was great for me.

give_me_a_latte
07-06-2010, 11:33 PM
I haven't read all the responses yet so Ii apologize if I'm repeating anything!!!

We LOVE Hooked on Phonics. We have the newest editions, so I don't know how they compare to the previous ones. It's a lot of fun for my son, and he asks to do a lesson every single day. The Pre-K level was mostly letter recognition and sounds, which he already knew. We're now in the K level. He's three-and-a-half and can read two little books on his own so far after about seven lessons. The lessons start with a quick DVD clip. Then you move to the student book, where they practice reading the words they're learning for the lesson (for example, for the lesson -at he read words like cat, mat, hat, pat, rat). There's additional print outs, activities, and video clips online for each lesson. I love that it's multimedia, so it keeps his attention..AND I can break it up throughout the day if I need to. Overall I'm really happy with HOP.

Since he is so young, I'm going to use All About Spelling as our spelling curriculum in a few years. It covers a lot of the rules that he isn't really picking up right now.

SherryZoned
07-06-2010, 11:37 PM
I ended up going with HOP...the one that has PREK-2nd but have an open mind about other learning styles as well.

give_me_a_latte
07-06-2010, 11:41 PM
Great!! Don't get discouraged by the Pre-K level though. I was bored to tears with that level (my son LOVED it though, I should add). It was so monotonous. If your child already knows their letter names and sounds I think you'd be just fine skipping the Pre-K level. I kind of used it as a jumping off point for letter crafts and projects, trying to make it fun!!

SherryZoned
07-06-2010, 11:48 PM
LOL yeah he is so bored with the PREK level but 2 year old loves it.. LOL i am like we are reviewing and he is like can we just move forward LOL

sb12345
07-07-2010, 01:54 PM
I am trying to find a program for my soon to be 5-year old as well.

For now, I read to her and she follows my finger when I read. She has caught on and can read simple books pretty well. She loves read-aloud time with mommy. I also do this with my 3-year old. My 4-year old helps me teach my 3-year old letters and they both love this!

Just some simple, everyday suggestions until we both find the right match for our children :)

StartingOver
07-07-2010, 04:30 PM
Is there a perfect program ??? LOL I am not sure at all. Over the years I have used many things. I still use many things. starfall, leap frog, HOP, OPGTR, Progressive Phonics, I See Sam, Sonlight readers...... I think change keeps them excited. Many different methods work best for mine. But I still adore the spine of OPGTR.

Sarbare0704
07-08-2010, 12:41 AM
Well now that I have officially heard you guys talk about starfall about a billion times I finally checked it out LOL! Im so glad I did! I think that we will surely be using that this year! Looks great!

octobersky69
07-12-2010, 01:23 PM
Not sure if you already chose a program, but I am on my 3rd year of using McRuffy Press Language Arts Program and it is wonderful. My son is 7 and is able to read intermediate readers, chapter books independently. I can not say enough, we started with hooked on phonics a few months prior to starting kndg, and my son did not like it, but he loves McRuffy.

BeverlyM
07-15-2010, 02:44 AM
Basically I bought a book called How to Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons and taught my daughter phonics at the age of 5 after she knew the alphabet. So over the course of the year we did that every other day and we took out a few flash cards here and there and went over sounds with those just to break up the monotony some. She turned 6 in April but still hadn't started reading on her own so I started to wonder if I'd wasted my time. But about a month ago something just clicked and now she can read pretty much anything she tries to. It's amazing to see her pick up a book and finish it with minimal help from me. And I'm not talking about "See Jane Run" books either :)

PollFabaire
07-17-2010, 12:08 PM
My son learned his letters and sounds very quickly from DVDs (Meet the letters and Leapfrog) and started reading short words at 3.5 using the Bob books. We do spelling tests based on words he likes to use (he's obsessed with numbers and space) online using Spellcity.com. He also like traffic/street signs so we always stop to read those on walks. Other than that we just read stories and I point out new words. He can read simple stories to his baby brother unassisted.