PDA

View Full Version : Anyone ever done their Thanksgiving turkey in the crockpot?



ItoLina
11-17-2012, 04:35 PM
I am seriously considering it this year...it just seams so much easier.
If you have, how did it come out? What did you put in there with it? How did you prep it?
Thanks!

Stella M
11-17-2012, 04:36 PM
How big is your crock pot !!!???

farrarwilliams
11-17-2012, 04:59 PM
That was my first thought too!

I'm sure it would be great... if I had a huge crockpot. Presumably you could do a turkey breast in there. Or a whole chicken.

dbmamaz
11-17-2012, 05:05 PM
I dont really like the way meat comes out in a slow cooker. But i LOVE my turkey recipe . . . not sure how you would adjust for a bigger bird, though. . . . probably increase both times and cook until done

4 cups kosher salt or 2 cups table salt
1 turkey (12 to 14 pounds gross weight), rinsed thoroughly; giblets, neck, and tailpiece removed and reserved to make gravy
3 medium onions, chopped coarse
1 1/2 medium carrots, chopped coarse
1 1/2 celery stalks, chopped coarse
6 thyme sprigs
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

1. Dissolve salt in 2 gallons of cold water in large stockpot or clean bucket. Add turkey and refrigerate or set in very cool (40 degrees or less) spot for 4 to 6 hours.
2. Remove turkey from salt water and rinse both cavities and skin under cool running water for several minutes until all traces of salt are gone. Pat dry inside and out with paper towels. Place turkey on meat rack set over rimmed sheet pan. Place turkey in refrigerator, uncovered, and air-dry for at least 8 hours or overnight.
3. Adjust oven rack to lowest position, and heat oven to 400 degrees. Toss one-third of onion, carrot, celery, and thyme with 1 tablespoon of melted butter and place this mixture in body cavity. Bring turkey legs together and perform a simple truss.
4. Scatter remaining vegetables and thyme over a shallow roasting pan. Pour 1 cup water over vegetables. Set V-rack in pan. Brush entire breast side of turkey with half of remaining butter, then place turkey, breast side down, on V-rack. Brush entire backside of turkey with remaining butter.
5. Roast for 45 minutes. Remove pan from oven (close oven door); baste with juices from pan. With wad of paper toweling in each hand, turn turkey, leg/thigh side up. If liquid in pan has totally evaporated, add another 1/2 cup water. Return turkey to oven and roast for 15 minutes. Remove turkey from oven again, baste, and again use paper toweling to turn other leg/thigh side up; roast for another 15 minutes. Remove turkey from oven for final time, baste, and turn it breast side up; roast until breast registers about 165 degrees and thigh registers 170 to 175 degrees on an instant-read thermometer, 30 to 45 minutes. Remove turkey from pan and let rest until ready to carve. Serve with gravy.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
11-17-2012, 08:47 PM
I've only done the breast in the crock pot and it turned out well. I find poultry in the crock pot is tricky though--it's not forgiving of being overcooked even a little.

farrarwilliams
11-17-2012, 09:18 PM
Everything I made in my crockpot was overcooked. Things would say cook for eight hours... I'd cook them for three... and they'd still be tough and overdone. I finally ditched it. I think it was just a crummy crockpot.

Operetta
11-18-2012, 09:21 AM
I've only done the breast in the crock pot and it turned out well. I find poultry in the crock pot is tricky though--it's not forgiving of being overcooked even a little.

I agree - I have not been happy with any poultry recipes in the crock pot. but I also hate the taste of boiled poultry and that's what I think it tastes like. So it could work.

Farrar - depending on what sort of recipes you were using, if you stopped after 3 hours the meat would have actually been very underdone -- the usual point of slow cooking is to break down the collagen in the meat, and that can take a looooong time. After 3 hours the meat would be safe to eat but very tough; after 8-10 it is falling apart tender.

farrarwilliams
11-18-2012, 10:45 AM
No, after 8 hours, the meat was a dried out brick, which was why I tried using low when the recipes said high and then tried doing them for much less time but it was a bit pointless. There was no right time with this thing, thus the getting rid of it. It wasn't that bad originally. I think it was just a Friday model. I was going to replace it but then the report about the lead in them came out and I was like, you know, I'd rather just use my Le Crueset in the oven for a pot roast and do without for other stuff. Every once in awhile I entertain getting a new one though - when I have things other people have made in them, it's yummy.

ItoLina
11-18-2012, 12:39 PM
We actually are planning to have our whole turkey cut in half and cook it in 2 separate crock pots :)

ItoLina
11-18-2012, 12:42 PM
Thanks for the recipe!
I am just never happy about how my turkey comes out, and it is so much word, so I am hoping to get more for my effort this year. :)



I dont really like the way meat comes out in a slow cooker. But i LOVE my turkey recipe . . . not sure how you would adjust for a bigger bird, though. . . . probably increase both times and cook until done

4 cups kosher salt or 2 cups table salt
1 turkey (12 to 14 pounds gross weight), rinsed thoroughly; giblets, neck, and tailpiece removed and reserved to make gravy
3 medium onions, chopped coarse
1 1/2 medium carrots, chopped coarse
1 1/2 celery stalks, chopped coarse
6 thyme sprigs
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

1. Dissolve salt in 2 gallons of cold water in large stockpot or clean bucket. Add turkey and refrigerate or set in very cool (40 degrees or less) spot for 4 to 6 hours.
2. Remove turkey from salt water and rinse both cavities and skin under cool running water for several minutes until all traces of salt are gone. Pat dry inside and out with paper towels. Place turkey on meat rack set over rimmed sheet pan. Place turkey in refrigerator, uncovered, and air-dry for at least 8 hours or overnight.
3. Adjust oven rack to lowest position, and heat oven to 400 degrees. Toss one-third of onion, carrot, celery, and thyme with 1 tablespoon of melted butter and place this mixture in body cavity. Bring turkey legs together and perform a simple truss.
4. Scatter remaining vegetables and thyme over a shallow roasting pan. Pour 1 cup water over vegetables. Set V-rack in pan. Brush entire breast side of turkey with half of remaining butter, then place turkey, breast side down, on V-rack. Brush entire backside of turkey with remaining butter.
5. Roast for 45 minutes. Remove pan from oven (close oven door); baste with juices from pan. With wad of paper toweling in each hand, turn turkey, leg/thigh side up. If liquid in pan has totally evaporated, add another 1/2 cup water. Return turkey to oven and roast for 15 minutes. Remove turkey from oven again, baste, and again use paper toweling to turn other leg/thigh side up; roast for another 15 minutes. Remove turkey from oven for final time, baste, and turn it breast side up; roast until breast registers about 165 degrees and thigh registers 170 to 175 degrees on an instant-read thermometer, 30 to 45 minutes. Remove turkey from pan and let rest until ready to carve. Serve with gravy.

Pefa
11-18-2012, 01:17 PM
farrar - it could totally be the crockpot. I just got a new one and things are much better now.

dbmamaz
11-18-2012, 02:04 PM
My husband loves this one chicken crock pot recipe I have - the kids like it ok but i just dont like the texture of the meat. What some people seem to see as 'falling-of-the-bone tender' seems to me more like so overcooked its no longer meat, but something closer to paste. Since the rest of the family doesnt find the meat so distasteful, I just mix a bit of meat with lots of veggies, rice and sauce and enjoy the flavor despite the texture.

and fwiw, brined turkey (or breast) seems to bother dh's tummy . .. we just cant win around here.

Oh, and I think the whole bit about turning the bird over and over and over is important in that turkey recipe - i usually use a large, sturdy implement of some kind in the cavity to hold the weight, and paper towels on the wings to turn it

Sionnon
11-18-2012, 04:08 PM
I've never tried in a crock pot, I don't have one large enough. We brine our turkey for a day or two before hand though.

dragonfly
11-18-2012, 04:49 PM
My mom cooks her turkey in a big plastic bag in the oven, and it always comes out tender and juicy.

For chicken, I like using the Romertopf clay cooker.

I rarely use my crock pot. I prefer the cast iron dutch oven for pot roasts and other slow cooking. The lid seals tight because of the seasoning, and the little points on the inside of the lid let the steam condense and drip back into the pan so it loses little moisture.

Operetta
11-19-2012, 10:59 AM
farrar - yep, sounds like a bad crockpot. I generally just prefer the oven, but I can't use it in the summer -- which is now about 6 months long -- so that's what got me to finally get a crockpot. I prefer oven-roasted in general.

ItoLina
11-19-2012, 03:55 PM
Hmmm...I don't know if I just have a really good crock pot, but we always love how things come out in there. I use it ALL the time. I think I am going to actually cut it apart ahead of time and just season it like a normal turkey and see what happens :p I just want to do something different this year for some reason. We will see how it goes.

wife&mommy
11-19-2012, 04:39 PM
I have cooked one in the crockpot. I couldn't get the lid on at first, I just had to put it on top of the bird but as it cooked the top lowered. I didn't do anything special, just seasoned like normal (I usually just do garlic, onion, salt, etc.). It turned out really good and juicy. But it was only for our family, not hosting or anything. I'd do it again.

ItoLina
11-20-2012, 08:45 PM
I have cooked one in the crockpot. I couldn't get the lid on at first, I just had to put it on top of the bird but as it cooked the top lowered. I didn't do anything special, just seasoned like normal (I usually just do garlic, onion, salt, etc.). It turned out really good and juicy. But it was only for our family, not hosting or anything. I'd do it again.

That is reassuring. :)

I am just doing it for our family too, so not a HUGE deal if I totally mess it up...but still nice to know that it has been done before.

Crabby Lioness
11-22-2012, 09:31 PM
I've crocked turkey breasts for over 20 years. It does a good job with big pieces of poultry like that, but not with smaller ones. These days I usually start it in the crock pot and finish it in the oven.

Every year we buy some 20lb birds when they go on sale, butcher them, and crock the breasts in the winter. the rest of the year we cook the wings, drumsticks, and thighs separately. The backs are saved for soups.

I have a gourmet recipe for a large turkey, but I've never needed it. It was in a cookbook I gave to a friend for a wedding present. He called me up on Thanksgiving to give me his family's thanks. After years of searching for a good recipe that would feed their army of guests, this one did the trick. It cooks a delicate bird without brining.

From The Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook, here's the Chinese-American method of roasting a turkey:

6 slices fresh ginger root
4 scallions
3 cups soy sauce
1 cup sherry
10 cups water
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 turkey (10lb)
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 head lettuce

1. Slice ginger root and trim scallions; combine in a large, heave saucepan with soy sauce, sherry, water, sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil.

2. Wipe turkey with a damp cloth and lower into a pan. Bring to a boil again; then simmer, covered, 45 minutes, turning once or twice for even coloring. Heat oven to 350 degrees.

3. Transfer bird and some of it's stock to a roasting pan. Roast 1 hour, basting with stock at 10-minute intervals.

4. Sprinkle bird with sesame oil. Turn oven up to 450 degrees. Let bird brown thoroughly (10 - 15 minutes); then remove and cool slightly.

Now that I have teenagers and a 12quart pasta pot, it's probably time I try it for myself.

Epiphany
11-22-2012, 10:30 PM
We used an electric roaster for the turkey this year, which is basically a glorified crock pot. It turned out well

ItoLina
11-24-2012, 01:16 PM
Just wanted to come back and update...the turkey crockpot was a success! Very yummy!

Freedom
11-28-2012, 09:18 AM
Thanks for posting the results. I've done whole chicken but never turkey in a crockpot.