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Deli76
09-13-2012, 10:18 PM
put a star on a chart to show completed work? My aunt who homeschooled her 3 kids suggested this. She suggested to use it as an incentive. To show her what she has accomplished and give her a reward for completion. I decided to reward her after 20 stars with an ice cream or a littlest pet shop (i cant stand the littlest pet shops, but oh well) or something of her choice, whatever she feels she likes at that time. She seems to really enjoy it. I was wondering if anyone uses something like this and if you put any twists to it?

Paula
09-13-2012, 10:36 PM
My son has a responsibility chart with listed chores and a category for "completed school work." He's awarded with stickers that are "worth" 10 cents each and, at the end of the week, he earns his allowance (He does other expected chores as well).

I use the sticker-applying ritual to verbally thank him and acknowledge his attitude in his work. Most of the stickers, for instance, say "Awesome!" or "Thank You," so I will tell him that he deserves a big "Thank You" for not only his speed in putting toys away but his good attitude as well. I think the intrinsic award of hearing that he did a good job means more to him than the stickers and allowance.

We have a separate chart for "character/attitude points." He earns points for good attitude or exhibiting the character trait of the month (this month is diligence). He's a good kid, so mostly it just gives me a reason to vocally highlight what he is doing well. At the end of the week, "if" he earns his points, he earns a field trip or extra fun activity.

There are some people who dislike the whole reward system, but I think that as long as some genuine acknowledgment of their good character/work ethic goes along with it, that it is perfectly fine. Everyone likes a little treat every now and then!

Stella M
09-13-2012, 11:23 PM
No star charts here. The reward for doing your work is - er - getting your work done.

I kind of wish I had a star chart for me though, and every time I got ten stars I got to go to the movies or something.

dbmamaz
09-13-2012, 11:44 PM
My kids arent allowed back on electronics until its done. and they get a checklist they can check off.

JinxieFox
09-14-2012, 05:39 AM
No charts here but, like Cara, no electronic devices are permitted until school work is complete.

I've known families that did very well with a sticker chart/reward/incentive system. I think if I had more than one child to think about at a time, I'd do it too, just to stay more organized and ensure no child was overlooked as far as recognition.

Pefa
09-14-2012, 06:55 AM
I've done that mostly for specific things that need changing or reinforcing. FWIW one of my brothers, who teaches physics at a very competitive high school, uses gold stars on tests and homework even in his AP classes. He says it's amazing what otherwise cool teenagers will do to earn a star.

ginnyjf
09-14-2012, 12:33 PM
I think it depends completely on the age of the child. Stars/stickers stopped being motivating for Zack about three years ago. I'm with Stella - I want a reward chart for myself.

Marmalade
09-14-2012, 03:32 PM
For the younger kids I do something similar. For instance, my 7 year old was doing Funnix Math-which was 100 lessons long. To help him keep track of where he was and how many he had left to go I printed out a 100s Chart and he would put a sticker over the lesson number after he was done. There were no awards given for completion though.

He really seemed to enjoy it-I did it for another son and a different subject and at the time he was still learning very basic math so the chart helped with counting as well.

I'm not a big fan of rewards...the satisfaction of completing, as Stella said, should be reward enough.

dragonfly
09-14-2012, 04:10 PM
I did this one year when ds was 6 or 7. I don't think it actually changed his motivation at all. He got stars, but he wasn't trying to get them, he was just doing his normal work. Plus, when he didn't get one for some reason (poor work, bad behavior, etc.), I think it actually de-motivated him. He enjoyed getting the stars, but I don't think he ever really got the concept of working to earn them, so it became less of a reward system and more of a punishment, because he didn't get them when he was "bad."

I don't know if that made sense, sorry.

I've tried various other reward systems in the past, and they never really worked the way I had intended. If there was some sort of reward to be earned, and he had a bad day, or didn't know how to do something, or whatever, he felt like he failed and would never earn the reward, therefore he might as well give up. Then he'd be devastated about losing the reward.

Now he does what needs to be done because it needs to be done. The only real reward is more free time if he's done early.

bigbird171
09-14-2012, 05:35 PM
Firstly, my daughter is 4 and has ADHD.

We do a sticker and coupon reward system. I call it "Build a Rainbow". Subjects are broken organized by rainbow color. Each color gets a weekly goal. When she finishes a goal, she gets a sticker, in that color, in our log book. If she "builds" a rainbow by the end of the week (a sticker for every subject), she gets a coupon. We call the coupons "Rainbow rewards". They are for things we don't normally do, and cost $5 or less. (bake a treat, sundaes, 10 tokens at Chuck E. Cheese, ect.)

I write out the goals on a dry erase board. This helps me to keep her motivation going, because it is in open sight!

She also is not big on being read to. So I made a 1-100 chart for her, and mark off the amount of books we have read. When she finishes it, I will take her out to a movie.

zcat
09-14-2012, 06:05 PM
put a star on a chart to show completed work? My aunt who homeschooled her 3 kids suggested this. She suggested to use it as an incentive. To show her what she has accomplished and give her a reward for completion. I decided to reward her after 20 stars with an ice cream or a littlest pet shop (i cant stand the littlest pet shops, but oh well) or something of her choice, whatever she feels she likes at that time. She seems to really enjoy it. I was wondering if anyone uses something like this and if you put any twists to it?

We don't have a chart or a big reward after completing so much work.

When dd finishes her math she can choose a sticker to put on the page or I will do a drawing for her. It doesn't earn her more rewards. I don't do that for other subjects.

If dd finishes all of her work for the day I will play a video game with her.

Inky
09-14-2012, 09:41 PM
I get out the sticker book when a whole book is done, and he gets to decorate it. A star a day or more would lose its charm.

Beckman
09-14-2012, 10:08 PM
No Star Charts here. We just get our work done.

crunchynerd
09-25-2012, 12:28 AM
I keep trying Chore charts, and I keep failing at that, even! I never keep up with them. They are so neat, and the kids love the idea, and then I blink, at the same chart has been there since last week, or the week before. Like blogs, I start them, and then abandon them!
:p

Avalon
09-25-2012, 01:21 AM
I have avoided sticker charts, prizes or any kind of "incentives" ever since I read Punished by Rewards by Alfie Kohn.

I suppose the only exception is the concept that "once we get our work done, we can have some fun." Or "let's get our work finished before lunch, so the whole afternoon is free." I don't see it as an external reward, rather as learning how to organize your time.

Paula
09-27-2012, 10:52 AM
I think there's a huge distinction between the reward (sticker/candy/incentive) and the award. I feel like doling out a sticker for completed work just isn't enough. The emphasis goes on the award, the spoken appreciation and acknowledgment of a job well done.

That's why I love the stickers with the words on 'em. I read the sticker and tell him, for example, that he deserves "Good Job!" because he worked extra hard that morning even though it was mostly new stuff to him. Presenting the sticker is more an opportunity for us to talk and for me to acknowledge his work, his character, and his improvements.