PDA

View Full Version : Help with unit on King Tut (middle school)



Mom2AandE
08-07-2012, 08:02 PM
This is going to be our very first year homeschooling my daughter who is at the 6th grade level. I am still learning the ropes on how to even find curriculum so I am a bit stumped on how to find a free/cheap stand alone unit on Ancient Egypt/King Tut. We have tickets to the King Tut exhibit at the Seattle Science Center and need to use them by the beginning of Dec. I want to do a learning unit before we go to the exhibit. I need help getting started. I am feeling a bit anxious/overwhelmed right now.

Stella M
08-07-2012, 08:21 PM
Well, what i would do is make the exhibition 'the' focus of the learning and do some pre and post visit activities.

Sometimes there are online education notes along with an exhibition ?

Failing that, go to the library ( if you have one ) and see what they have on Ancient egypt in general and King Tut in particular.
Read to your dd or require her to read.

Go to museum.

Have her write a 1 page narration on what she found interesting/knows about KT from her reading and the exhibition.

If she's crafty, find an online AE craft to do.

If she's not crafty, well...don't worry about it!

Seriously, a bit of reading, an exhibition, a bit of narration, an extra craft or other activity or two...I personally would find that sufficient for 6th grade.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/ Has some stuff about KT on there plus general AE stuff, hth!

farrarwilliams
08-07-2012, 09:00 PM
Time to mummify a chicken! :D

More seriously (though I have mummified several chickens with middle schoolers... just saying...) whatever else you end up doing, please read David Macauley's Motel of the Mysteries and discuss it. This is an amazing parody book about the discovery of Tut's tomb which is very funny but also raises a lot of very serious questions about archaeology and the interpretations we have of past societies.

Stella M
08-07-2012, 09:52 PM
We mummified an apple instead.

Jackielyn
08-07-2012, 10:19 PM
Time to mummify a chicken! :D

More seriously (though I have mummified several chickens with middle schoolers... just saying...) whatever else you end up doing, please read David Macauley's Motel of the Mysteries and discuss it. This is an amazing parody book about the discovery of Tut's tomb which is very funny but also raises a lot of very serious questions about archaeology and the interpretations we have of past societies.

Freaking awesome, I wish I would have thought of mummifying something. My oldest took a special interest in King Tut when we covered Ancient Egypt. The Discovery channel has a pretty good documentary on King Tut which he found enlightening.

farrarwilliams
08-07-2012, 10:37 PM
I did an orange with my own kids... But next time...

Mom2AandE
08-07-2012, 10:54 PM
Thanks for all of your suggestions. I guess I was overthinking it. ;)

towhee
08-07-2012, 11:59 PM
We're seeing Tut in October and I haven't really started prep yet, but I did find that there is an educator's guide for the exhibit itself. Here's the link:

http://kingtut.org/images/stories/seattle_tut_educator_guide.pdf

Tori

Mom2AandE
08-08-2012, 12:17 AM
Time to mummify a chicken! :D

More seriously (though I have mummified several chickens with middle schoolers... just saying...) whatever else you end up doing, please read David Macauley's Motel of the Mysteries and discuss it. This is an amazing parody book about the discovery of Tut's tomb which is very funny but also raises a lot of very serious questions about archaeology and the interpretations we have of past societies.

Thanks for the recommendation. I have the book requested at the library. I also found on Amazon a study guide and lesson plans for the book in the Kindle format. I may buy the study guide after I get the book.

Mom2AandE
08-08-2012, 12:19 AM
We're seeing Tut in October and I haven't really started prep yet, but I did find that there is an educator's guide for the exhibit itself. Here's the link:

http://kingtut.org/images/stories/seattle_tut_educator_guide.pdf

Tori

Thanks! I hadn't even thought to look for that. I was going to start looking for one after Stella's recommendation.

CatInTheSun
08-08-2012, 01:40 AM
Yes, there are study notes for teachers/classes on the website, so I would start with that. Books from the library with really good photos of egyptian art and artifacts might be good, and you might even look into the history and issues of excavation, ownership (removal of items from the country) and preservation. If the library has Bauer's "Story of the World Vol 1" on AudioBook, you could listen to the first part on Egypt as a quick history primer.

naturegirl7
08-08-2012, 02:22 AM
Netflix has some awesome documentaries on Ancient Egypt. Watch those, read some books, and definitely mummify the chicken!

GThomas
09-13-2012, 10:36 AM
Hi Mom2AandE. I was searching for information on the same topic and found your post here. I too am homeschooling for the first time this year. My dd10 is in 6th grade and ds7 in 2nd.

We have been studying about Ancient Egypt. For the King Tut part, I found the Jackdaw Tutanhamun and the Discovery of the Tomb kit. I'm new at this but it seems they put together copies of original documents for your students to explore. There are several things in there including posters, photographs, things you can fold and make, but my favorite is a copy of a newspaper article on the discovery and Lord Carnarvon dead from a mosquito bite (and the superstitions that it was brought on by the gods). I think it's more exciting to me than my daughter. It's not a complete teaching kit by any means.

We were in London over the summer and went to see the museum that has an extensive ancient Egypt display but we had not studied it yet. The kids couldn't have cared less. I think if I took them now that we studied it a bit they'd be more interested. The actual mummies are always a hit though. It's probably too late for you at this point but if you can read about it before hand I think it's better for them.

My plan is to have my dd put together a large poster that is a collage about King Tut. She's collecting facts that she's typing into a report. We'll use that information to look for pictures online to print out and she will paste those, along with her report onto the poster. We'll end up using a lot of the information from the Jackdaw kit for that.

One book my dd did read from cover to cover was: Horrible Histories The Awesome Egyptians. It's not focused only on King Tut. She's also enjoying the Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan. We've read lots of other books we've found at the library specifically for kids.

Other projects that we've done that are Egyptian but not King Tut specific are:
1) make a pyramid out of construction paper. Build the Nile river in a baking pan, add pyramids made out of foil, plant seeds in it and flood it several times.
2) we created our own video of the story of Osiris, Isis and Set. We used the paper dolls in the Ancient Egyptian Costumes History of Costume Series and picture we colored from the A Coloring Book of Ancient Egypt. It was hilarious. Came out really well. They especially enjoyed ripping up Osiris's body (the paper doll) and "spreading" the across Egypt. And doing a silly version of creating a mummy where we poured real salt and oil, etc. onto the paper doll.

Anyways, I thought I'd hate teaching history and it's become my favorite subject now! I hope that was helpful if it's not too late!

Melyssa
09-13-2012, 02:26 PM
No suggestions but we went to see the King Tut exhibit in Seattle a couple months ago and I loved it!

Mom2AandE
09-13-2012, 03:54 PM
Thanks for the comments. It is not too late as we have just started school and haven't even thought about the King Tut unit yet.

Mom2AandE
09-13-2012, 03:56 PM
Hi Mom2AandE. I was searching for information on the same topic and found your post here. I too am homeschooling for the first time this year. My dd10 is in 6th grade and ds7 in 2nd.

We have been studying about Ancient Egypt. For the King Tut part, I found the Jackdaw Tutanhamun and the Discovery of the Tomb kit. I'm new at this but it seems they put together copies of original documents for your students to explore. There are several things in there including posters, photographs, things you can fold and make, but my favorite is a copy of a newspaper article on the discovery and Lord Carnarvon dead from a mosquito bite (and the superstitions that it was brought on by the gods). I think it's more exciting to me than my daughter. It's not a complete teaching kit by any means.

We were in London over the summer and went to see the museum that has an extensive ancient Egypt display but we had not studied it yet. The kids couldn't have cared less. I think if I took them now that we studied it a bit they'd be more interested. The actual mummies are always a hit though. It's probably too late for you at this point but if you can read about it before hand I think it's better for them.

My plan is to have my dd put together a large poster that is a collage about King Tut. She's collecting facts that she's typing into a report. We'll use that information to look for pictures online to print out and she will paste those, along with her report onto the poster. We'll end up using a lot of the information from the Jackdaw kit for that.

One book my dd did read from cover to cover was: Horrible Histories The Awesome Egyptians. It's not focused only on King Tut. She's also enjoying the Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan. We've read lots of other books we've found at the library specifically for kids.

Other projects that we've done that are Egyptian but not King Tut specific are:
1) make a pyramid out of construction paper. Build the Nile river in a baking pan, add pyramids made out of foil, plant seeds in it and flood it several times.
2) we created our own video of the story of Osiris, Isis and Set. We used the paper dolls in the Ancient Egyptian Costumes History of Costume Series and picture we colored from the A Coloring Book of Ancient Egypt. It was hilarious. Came out really well. They especially enjoyed ripping up Osiris's body (the paper doll) and "spreading" the across Egypt. And doing a silly version of creating a mummy where we poured real salt and oil, etc. onto the paper doll.

Anyways, I thought I'd hate teaching history and it's become my favorite subject now! I hope that was helpful if it's not too late!

Awesome ideas! I have read the Red Pyramid and thought it was really good. I should find the next one in the series. We have it up in my son's room.