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View Full Version : Those whose kids have tried public school: verdict?



crunchynerd
07-30-2012, 09:32 AM
Was public school a good thing, or a bad thing, overall? Why?

A good thing overall

A bad thing overall

I hope I'm making this poll correctly, but fear I'm not. Clicked the 'Post a poll' option below, but so far, no poll-creation window has opened.
I just previewed and see no way to name poll options. Chose 2 in the data field for poll options, but this is just acting like a regular post. I'll see if that changes when I submit. May that will be where I actually create the poll. :confused:

bcnlvr
07-30-2012, 12:26 PM
Been there, done that, have t-shirt. No thanks.

Why: huge classroom size, bullying, lack of 1-to-1 contact between teacher/student, pop-culture environment, lack of supervision, lack of academic differentiation, lack of ability to follow rabbit holes and interests, writing focused on quantity not quality, teaching to the "test", loss of parental power and influence, shall I continue??!!

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
07-30-2012, 12:52 PM
Just kindergarten, and it simply wasn't the place for my quirky, bright, high strung boy. We're still dealing with the behavioral fall out two years later. I wouldn't even consider it for my daughter right now, even though she's generally easy going and social. The academics pale compared to what we do at home, and we live in a "good" school district (in quotation marks because "good" really means mostly families who are native English speakers with high incomes :_p:).

ourjourney
07-30-2012, 02:22 PM
I was conflicted on how to answer this poll as Kindergarten was great. At that age my son primarily needed to work on maturing socially and emotionally and he accomplished just that. His teacher was amazing and kept the kids excited as they put together a Mexican festival complete with pinata, made letters with their bodies out on the playground, learned ballet and taped paper under their tables so they could lay under their desks and paint like Michelangelo with red berets perched on their heads. His teacher also gave the children plenty of time for free play inside and out. It was a public school and I am not sure how he was able to pull it all off without the administration giving him a hard time, but he did.

The problems started when the focus changed to academics in first grade. There was no time for the fun of Kindergarten, and most of the social studies and science disappeared. The focus was now on reading and math and since my son could do both he was generally ignored. His love for learning was fading as he spent most of the day doing activities he had already mastered or quietly reading a book he brought from home under his desk. There was a huge focus on discipline (walking in a straight line on the right side of the hallway, making military turns, no talking during much of the lunch period etc...) that was reinforced with tickets and prizes for those children who were "caught" behaving. Despite all the friends he had there he didn't want to go to school each day and he was becoming angry and withdrawn. I had had enough. I think the teachers and staff of the school were doing their best but it is really hard, if not impossible, to give a quality individualized education to each student while attending to crowd control in a school of 500 young children.

Oceana
07-30-2012, 02:54 PM
Perhaps an other selection would be beneficial. Neither of these answers sum up my feelings.

Sionnon
07-30-2012, 03:06 PM
We were in between, for my 9 year old public school was great and so is home schooling. For my 12 year old public school was great until 4th grade.

dbmamaz
07-30-2012, 03:15 PM
one of my kids even graduated . . albeit with her last 2 years spent mostly in community college. she is no longer in touch with any of her school friends (I still am with mine, tho?) and we all agree she would have loved being home schooled. she and i just werent talking from ages 11-17, and both husbands objected until her Sr year when she was already happy in community college. the boys had hell through 7th / k

Marmalade
07-30-2012, 05:55 PM
I think overall it just wasn't for us. I don't really know if I think it's entirely bad...I know that we are much better with out it...so I'll go ahead and select "bad"

Stella M
07-30-2012, 06:21 PM
I can't vote, because our experience is mixed.

Academically - patchy. All depends on a good teacher. A home education would have to be pretty lousy to be outclassed by school. I am itching to get in there and redesign the curriculum :)

Culture - school and kids - sucks.

Teachers - at our school, great. Very helpful, approachable, welfare focused.

Child at school - finding it a challenge. Bringing out her perfectionist tendencies. Hates hanging out with dumb people ( sorry, I know that isn't PC but there are a lot of kids who she can't stand because they are crude and rude. I am no help - I live my life in such a way I don't deal with 99% of people. )

Relationships - bad for sibling relationships. Ok for parent-child.

Homework - so stupid I want to scream. Unfair intrusion into family life. Stress causing.

I would prefer not to have a child in the system. It is tolerable, however.

Dd would prefer to be in the system but she is finding out it isn't all it's cracked up to be and is in the middle of working out how the pro's and con's balance up for her personally.

07-30-2012, 07:21 PM
Ours was overall a good experience because it was only half-day kindergarten and it made it very, very clear to me that homeschooling was the way to go. I had been on the fence prior to that. I am also glad my son got to experience it. He didn't like it overall and enjoys being homeschooled. He has maintained friendships with kids he met in public school. He was treated well and there were no bullying issues. That would make me feel very different about the situation.

Tex-Bex
07-30-2012, 08:55 PM
I think the teachers and staff of the school were doing their best but it is really hard, if not impossible, to give a quality individualized education to each student while attending to crowd control in a school of 500 young children.

This. Except our "small" neighborhood elementary school had over 800 K-5 kiddos last year!

I really can't vote "good" or "bad," because I feel it was OK. My kids were learning. There were things they enjoyed. But I felt very pushed away from being truly involved, aside from stuffing folders and making copies.

As soon as my kiddos came through the door in the afternoon, they were grumpy, argumentative, and worn out. I hated that transition period each day.

There are SO MANY kids in there who's parents are just grateful for the free daycare, and who probably just plop them in front of the TV all evening. My kids are super sweet and inquisitive and talented and are getting along with each other SO much better out of school, and I'd like to keep it that way. I think we will have a whole lot more fun as a family without PS.

lynne
07-30-2012, 09:00 PM
Bad. My son wasn't learning anything but had tons of busy work every night and he was miserable with all of the homework, especially all of the spelling assignments when he already knew how to spell the words.

He didn't know basic grammar and couldn't even identify a noun or verb! Yet he got good grades.

He was told to practice the times tables, so we worked on them every night and he learned them. The rest of the class did not, aside from 1-2 other students so they had to sit there and read a book while the rest of the class continued to take the times table quizzes.

I pulled him out the middle of 4th grade and he's learned so much since then. I'm 100% confident that we did the right thing and I have a negative opinion of public school now. I consider it nothing more than a state run daycare center. And it crushes a child's natural love of learning, imo.

MrsLOLcat
07-30-2012, 09:09 PM
I didn't vote because there wasn't an 'Other' option. For DS, it was a horrible experience. For DD, it was wonderful. Do *I* think public schools are wonderful? Not particularly, but I really do think that DD would be fine in one. DS never will be. *shrug*

Avalon
07-31-2012, 04:43 PM
I didn't vote, either, because I think the school experience was okay overall for my dd, but I hated the lifestyle. My dd went for K and grade 1. To me, she just didn't have enough time to play, we didn't have enough time together, she didn't get enough sleep, she didn't have enough time to finish her lunch, and so on. It was just too rushed and busy.

My son probably would have done fine in school, but after 5 years of having lots of freedom in his days, I just don't think he would be okay with and doing what he's told to do all day long. He also gets extremely annoyed with "stupid" rules or "stupid" behaviour, so just dealing with 30 other kids and a lot of rules would mostly make him mad.

crunchynerd
08-01-2012, 09:07 AM
Perhaps an other selection would be beneficial. Neither of these answers sum up my feelings.

I definitely want to hear from the undecided or mixed bag experiences. Could you tell about it, and why it's a complete split in the middle for you?

crunchynerd
08-01-2012, 09:14 AM
I didn't vote because there wasn't an 'Other' option. For DS, it was a horrible experience. For DD, it was wonderful. Do *I* think public schools are wonderful? Not particularly, but I really do think that DD would be fine in one. DS never will be. *shrug*

I apologize for that oversight. I do want to hear about the experiences of those for whom it's more complicated than a simple "good" or "bad". My DD really wants to go, to try it, for 3rd grade, and DH and I decided she needs to see for herself whether she'll like it and thrive, or want to go back to homeschooling, because she has transformed rather suddenly into someone who needs to test her own mettle, and frankly, she seems to need larger groups than we can easily provide where we live. We're guarded, but open to the possibility that she might actually thrive there. And if not, homeschooling will still be an option, though we may then have to deal with negative fall-out from schooling. It's a risk we'll take for her to have this chance to see for herself what she'd rather do. A year ago, I wouldn't have said yes, because she was so malleable, but as I said, she's had a sea change, mentally, emotionally, and socially. We'll just have to see. But I do want to go into it with eyes open. My sons will definitely not be entering school any younger than 8, and only if they really want to try it, because at least my DS1, has such incredible needs for gross motor outlet, and is such an individual, that I don't need telling, that to enter him into school early, would be disastrous.

crunchynerd
08-01-2012, 09:24 AM
Thanks for sharing that. I have a suspicion my DD will be in for something similar, but she has come to a point, where she just needs and wants to see what it's like, for herself. Then, if she loves it and continues to thrive, so be it...she can stay in so long as she's doing well in DH's and my estimation. If she hates it and stops thriving, she'll come back to homeschooling with some experience of why it's worth it, under her belt (and probably some school-caused problems to work through, but that's the risk we're taking). Either way, she will have learned something about herself that I think she just needs to know, now.

linseym
08-01-2012, 10:54 PM
Wish I could have voted twice. For my oldest it was horrible. HORRIBLE. I cannot stress how bad it was for him. His pre-k and Kinder years were great. His teachers were wonderful. Then it was almost totally downhill from there. First grade teacher - MEAN OLD WOMAN, had ZERO patience, year before taught 5th grade and because of a shortage they moved her to first grade. She told my husband and I that she "couldn't teach our son unless we put him on some sort of medication" (:mad: We got on a first name basis with the principal and the counselor of the school that year. The next year she was moved to administration, no longer taught in the class room)
Second Grade, his teacher just didn't care. I don't know if he really learned anything that year. We did learn however that he needed glasses.
Third Grade teacher was FANTASTIC. Worth her weight in Gold, Silver and Platinum. He struggled, we had him tested and he was diagnosed with ADD. His teacher worked with us, developing strategies to help him stay focused and organized. She supported our decision NOT to medicate. (We instead changed his diet, cut out red dye, added fish oil supplements, and cut out tv and video games during the week). He finished the year strong, passing the Math TAKS test.
Fourth Grade, 2 frosty cold and just plain mean women. I had a bad feeling about both of them from the start. They pressured and pressured us to put him on medication, we did much to our dismay. It seemed to help at first, but he couldn't stop loosing weight. 2 times the math teacher screamed (yes screamed) at him in the middle of class. He was failing math, (when the previous year he was passing) so I demanded that the principal move him out of the class, he finished out the year with a WONDERFUL teacher, passed his English TAKS, just barely missed passing the Math. (The screamer apparently had complaints from several other parents so she was pulled out of the class room and they made her an "intervention specialist")
fifth grade was the worst year. He was having a lot of negative side effects from the class of ADD drugs (weight loss, mood swings and insomnia) so his doctor switched him to a different class of drugs, which brought even more serious side effects. He had a 504 plan and his 5th grade teachers refused to follow it then blamed him for the outcome. My husband and I were in conference with them, the principal and vice principal and counselor almost every month. When we decided to stop the medications all together they were "very disappointed" and NEVER passed over an opportunity to tell us so. They felt that the answer to the negative side effects was just more medications. And yes, they were serious. Literally I had the teacher sit across the table from me, straight faced asking me why didn't I just "give him something to make him go to sleep?" literally my husband had to hold my arms to keep me from jumping across the table at her. It wasn't till the last week of school that my son finally told us everything that had gone on at school, how on 2 separate occasions he had gotten light headed and dizzy (when he was on the second class of medications) and had been sent to the nurse (who knew he was on meds), allowed to rest for a few minutes then sent back to class. One time his best friend caught him in pe class when he almost fainted, and helped him to the nurses office. NEVER did a note come home from the nurse and NEVER did they call either myself or my husband to tell us what had happened. We probably should have sued. We just decided to pull him out. My husband sat down with the principal of the school, had a lengthy conversation about all that had transpired and told him that our son wouldn't be back. My youngest is still enrolled in elementary school. We have left him in because he is doing so well. We were concerned that if we did pursue legal action that it may effect him negatively. Next year we will probably pull him and homeschool him as well. He has only had 1 so-so teacher, all the rest have been pretty good. His problem is that he is so far ahead of his class the teachers don't quite know what to do with him so they tend to just give him busy work. Last year he was 1 of 6 kids in his grade who was on all A honor roll all year. I joke that if I homeschooled him he would be the next Doogie Howser.

Wow, sorry for the ramble. I guess to sum it up, our experience has been bad with a few golden nuggets sprinkled in. I really think it depends on the district, principals and teachers. Weirdly I think other parents in the school have a lot to do with it too. I guess now days teachers are not used to parents "caring" about their kids and what they are learning in school. When a parent who actually shows up to parent teacher conferences, checks their kid's homework, and generally takes an active role in the educational career of their kids teachers just don't know what to do.

Stella M
08-02-2012, 04:55 AM
I'm sorry your son had such a bad time :(

dottieanna29
08-02-2012, 08:48 AM
One of mine just graduated after a 90% positive experience in public school. There was one year in middle school that had some bumps but nothing major.

I think on this board the majority of people are not going to have had positive experiences since that's a reason for a lot of people homeschooling. We homeschool for my son, who I'm sure would have a very negative experience if he went to public school. We were lucky enough to be able to realize this without ever having to enroll him, thanks to his one year in Early Intervention.

farrarwilliams
08-02-2012, 12:04 PM
Crunchynerd, is your dd going to do a partial day program of some sort? Are you thinking about stopping her, or just preparing yourself?

My kids have never set foot in a public school except to visit their cousin once. I doubt they ever will beyond that. :) So I've got nothing to add.

crunchynerd
08-02-2012, 08:37 PM
Crunchynerd, is your dd going to do a partial day program of some sort? Are you thinking about stopping her, or just preparing yourself?

My kids have never set foot in a public school except to visit their cousin once. I doubt they ever will beyond that. :) So I've got nothing to add.

She is really wanting to try school because she's never been, and she's turning 8, and she is extremely social, like wishes she had 7 to 10 BFF's around all the time to giggle and gaggle with. I don't blame her of course; I would have loved that too, as a girl in PS. I had 2 friends, real friends, in the whole experience, and both were early elementary, and both were from other countries. Go figure.

I don't have high hopes of her finding a lot of girls compatible with her, but then again, she's not me. She has something I never had, and doesn't have some of the serious square peg factors I always had. I think by nature she's just more of a joiner, or what I thought of in my childhood as "one of Them". So it remains to be seen. I have doubts, but am willing to be openminded enough to see this as a learning and character-building experience however it comes out.

My character-building part of all this was reality-checking myself against being an ideologue, in favor of being open to the possibility that she might thrive in that environment, and if so, I'd have to stand ready to support what works best for her, even if what works best for her, flies in the face of my own ideas. I will be totally surprised though, if she finds public school all that and a bagel with schmear.

It's hard to be in this position, because no matter what happens now, once she enrolls, I can be cast as having failed her somehow. If she loves school to pieces, all her thriving will be because of school, and I can be told it's a good thing we came to our senses (grrr!). If she finds out it's not all she dreamed it would be and ultimately decides a test run was enough and returns to homeschooling, we'd still be turncoats to some homeschoolers, because we were ever open to 'surrendering' her to the government schools. IF she bombs out and goes down in flames and we pull her out, it's because homeschooling made her an idiot who couldn't cut the mustard at "real" school. And if she returns to homeschooling after the experiment, all her future successes will be pinned on the fact that she had some schooling.

Makes me nuts just thinking about it. But I still feel inside like whatever comes of it, somehow, she really does seem to need and want to test herself this way, and I will support self-discovery.

As for part of fulltime, she wants to try it "all the way" and I am supportive of that, partly because I figure the whole experience will be a better basis for her to see what school life is really like in all its glory, and then if it's too much, part time or only certain classes are fine, or even total return to homeschooling. DH and I both have misgivings but agreed to be watchful, and if she starts turning into a pod person, pull her out regardless.:smile:

gypsylovecircus
08-02-2012, 09:27 PM
both of my kids really loved PS (dd in 5th grade and ds in 2nd) until halfway through last year. Socially, school was good for us, and my kids do miss it some days! The problem is that school wasn't good for much more than social!! So when dd got fed up with the middle school social scene, we knew there wasn't much point to going anymore.

lynne
08-02-2012, 11:15 PM
It's interesting. My son didn't complain about school until I took him out - then he told us how much he hated it. I don't know why he didn't complain about it while he was in there, but he didn't.

If I hadn't realized that he wasn't learning much at all there, I may never have taken him out. His grades were fine, he was at a school of "excellence", he had friends. I can understand why many parents never really grasp how little they are learning there, even though they spend 7 hours/day there. I'm glad I began gauging the content of his school work because I know I can do much better and I don't fear that he may not be learning enough because I know that he wasn't learning much of anything while in school. I never saw myself homeschooling. It is interesting how things work out in life.

farrarwilliams
08-02-2012, 11:37 PM
It's hard to be in this position, because no matter what happens now, once she enrolls, I can be cast as having failed her somehow. If she loves school to pieces, all her thriving will be because of school, and I can be told it's a good thing we came to our senses (grrr!). If she finds out it's not all she dreamed it would be and ultimately decides a test run was enough and returns to homeschooling, we'd still be turncoats to some homeschoolers, because we were ever open to 'surrendering' her to the government schools. IF she bombs out and goes down in flames and we pull her out, it's because homeschooling made her an idiot who couldn't cut the mustard at "real" school. And if she returns to homeschooling after the experiment, all her future successes will be pinned on the fact that she had some schooling.

Ugh. That's so true. I can't stand no-win situations. Though I guess it's not actually no-win for your dd, who might really like it and thrive - it's just no-win for validation of your parenting. Boo to that. But I hope it does work out for you. Good luck.

AmyButler
08-03-2012, 10:17 PM
For me, so much depends on the district and the child. My older daughter did well in Catholic Kindergarden where I sent her because the school she would have gone to publically was bad. We moved to where she did 1-4 and did well in a small town outside Pittsburgh. We moved to Michigan, and she thrived in Anchor Bay school. We moved to small town Eastern PA, and she never really fit in in the high school because they had all been together since elementary school and thought military kids must have three heads or something. She is a survivor though, and did well. My younger one started school in York County VA, and it was as close to heaven as I think a public school can be (looking back on it now). The teachers were all very well trained in differentiating eduction for the childs needs, and encouraging to the unique traits of every child. Parents were always welcome in the classroom unless they were doing the state tests, and were asked to come in and read to the class or share a hobby or special knowledge they might have about something that was being studied. Then we moved to a school where none of these things existed. My child was bullied by teachers over the same things the teachers in VA had celebrated about her. She went from a child who loved school and learning to one who is afraid to try anything new because she is "stupid" and "bad" and "will never amount to anything anyway" and I could go on and on. If any of you know anyone that is going to PCS to Westover ARB in MA, tell them NOW to homeschool before they put their child into that enviroment!

That said, I am hoping when we PCS again, I will be able to put her back into school--I am very nervous about being able to provide a highly gifted STEM interested child with what she will need in high school to accomplish her dreams--She is currently planning on Georgia Tech for undergrad and MIT for grad work in areospace engineering. God help me and send scholarship money!

Stella M
08-03-2012, 10:55 PM
Oh yes! A friend and I were just talking about this yesterday. Thankfully my high schooler is a strong humanities girl, so I am confident with that. A STEM high schooler ? I have no idea how I personally would accomplish that, though I am quite sure it can be done.

Deli76
08-04-2012, 12:11 AM
ds it has been a good thing. He like the rigidness, the schedule, the regularity. For dd it has been bad. She has great grades, but the experience with the teachers, the districtm the rigidness is not for her. She is such a free spirit. We are just starting homeschooling for her.

crunchynerd
08-05-2012, 06:48 PM
Ugh. That's so true. I can't stand no-win situations. Though I guess it's not actually no-win for your dd, who might really like it and thrive - it's just no-win for validation of your parenting. Boo to that. But I hope it does work out for you. Good luck.
I know. And I accept that it's just the ego-sting, and my daughter's happiness is worth much more than that, and I've taken egg on the face in the eyes of others, for less, so she's definitely worth that and more. Thanks for understanding though! It helps, and thanks for the positive vibes. Now I'm all confused about whether the free bus ride to the underperforming local school, is compelling enough, over 40 miles per day of transporting her myself (including digging out the minivan from under a foot of snow or ice all winter to go on roads that might not be plowed that early, with toddler and preschooler in tow). Keeping in mind that I'd have to have the hot made-from scratch breakfast (food allergies) in their tummies and all pottying, dressing, bundling, and lunch packing and hair doing done and everyone out the door into the de-iced, preheated and snow-shoveled minivan (no covered parking) in time to get her there for just past 8, I am not sure it makes common sense, even for a good school over a bad one, but the other little devil on the other shoulder says that convenience is not what should be driving this decision.

Hard call, and so little time left to investigate!

CatInTheSun
08-05-2012, 08:00 PM
That said, I am hoping when we PCS again, I will be able to put her back into school--I am very nervous about being able to provide a highly gifted STEM interested child with what she will need in high school to accomplish her dreams--She is currently planning on Georgia Tech for undergrad and MIT for grad work in areospace engineering. God help me and send scholarship money!

I may be biased (being a scientist myself), but I think it is a whole lot easier to help a highly achieving/gifted STEM hs child succeed in a college path than a child with say, an intense interest/gift in writing or history (or other humanities). There are TONS of materials and options to accelerate and "farm out" STEM subjects, the topics can be learned independently fine, science and math gifted programs are full of hs kids, and there are EEPs and it's not such a big deal to enroll a younger student (say, 9th grader) in a college-level math or science course. Some states will even pay the tuition (though not most). OTOH, topics like writing, history, or comparative literature at some point require a synergistic group environment, but I wouldn't exactly be comfortable enrolling my 13yo in a literature class at a community college. :x

As to undergrad money -- there can be some fine balance between credits earned before enrolling and eligibility, so there is a savings trade off if you go the route of getting credits before graduating HS, but as to grad school -- your dd better plan on working her tail off and getting her grad school paid for -- grad students are normally PAID a small stipend on top of their tuition being waived (most in engr are either employed, or on fellowships/RAs/TAs, though I can't say for sure what the deal at MIT is, some grad scholarships may be partial?), and if she wants to go to MIT for grad school she'll need to ace undergrad, do internships while in school, have great recommendations from profs, and ACE the GRE. Some luck will help, too. She should also be flexible -- she shouldn't be working about which school now (or by rep), but when she's closer to college be looking at which school is doing the research that is the most interesting and where the professor is that she really would like to work with (as well as issues like where she wants to work after school, because different schools are feeders to different companies and believe it or not, some people don't like to hire from MIT (or any given school), so best to talk to the folks doing the hiring in her desired field.

But be glad it's STEM. ;)

Stella M
08-05-2012, 10:02 PM
Maybe to the above Amy :)

History and English is our family thing...so having a child who is into all kinds of history, English and other associated humanities studies is a snap!

I disagree that they need a group environment either. I think it really depends on what the family strengths are as to what is easiest to provide in high school.

AmyButler
08-05-2012, 10:14 PM
I could handle it with little fear if her interests were lit, history, anthro, even philosophy--my MA is in Literature with a focus on historical linguistics. STEM stuff scares the crap out of me though--I barely passed Algebra 1 in high school. Bio was great and a lot of fun, but chem, physics--anything that invilves math beyond arithmatic makes my brain seize up and my palms sweat. We will see what happens when the time comes though--I will handle whatever I have to handle. She is only 10, so she may change her mind. I doubt it though since she decided this at 7 and has been researching what she wants to do since then. Thankfully, I have a friend who works at the NASA library who keeps her supplied with projects and information.

CatInTheSun
08-05-2012, 11:56 PM
There is so much greater access to information than when I was a child. There probably isn't any interest our children could pursue that we should fear...some just make us more uncomfortable than others. LOL

I still think it is easier to outsource STEM than humanities, *if* outsourcing becomes necessary. :D

hockeymom
08-06-2012, 07:06 AM
I could handle it with little fear if her interests were lit, history, anthro, even philosophy--my MA is in Literature with a focus on historical linguistics. STEM stuff scares the crap out of me though--I barely passed Algebra 1 in high school. Bio was great and a lot of fun, but chem, physics--anything that invilves math beyond arithmatic makes my brain seize up and my palms sweat. We will see what happens when the time comes though--I will handle whatever I have to handle. She is only 10, so she may change her mind. I doubt it though since she decided this at 7 and has been researching what she wants to do since then. Thankfully, I have a friend who works at the NASA library who keeps her supplied with projects and information.

I hear ya! My son decided at 5 that he wanted to go to MIT, and by that point he already knew exactly what he wants to do for a career. He has a huge (car related, of course) business plan mapped out, including an entire marketing plan and who he wants to study under (in S. Korea!) after going to university. He started mentally working on it at 3, and by 5 he felt pretty satisfied. 4 years later he's still sure it's still his life calling, though he doesn't spend much time planning it out like he used to.

I am SO not mathy or science-y, so I definitely understand your concerns. I have no idea what path his life will actually take, but when the time comes we'll probably be steering him away from somewhere like MIT. The likelihood of getting in to a program there is crazy slim, regardless of how gifted a kid might be, and I'm not convinced the rewards of it are in line with the costs (certainly not) or the stress.

Kids are fun, hey? :)

dottieanna29
08-06-2012, 08:15 AM
We may give our kids the option of public school for high school just because I think a lot of ds's issues may have settled down by then, plus we really do have an excellent high school. There's also community college and on-line learning. I'm more worried about foreign languages, art and music than I am about STEM. I have a biology degree and can do any math up to calculus. Dh has a Chemistry degree and is brilliant with physics and calculus. He also works in a lab (owns his own company) so the possibility of the kids being able to do some studies in a fully equipped lab is there.

Stella M
08-06-2012, 07:17 PM
Humanities families and STEM families need to do some swapping of students :)

Ayem
08-07-2012, 08:26 AM
DS is in public high school. At this stage I think it would be the wrong thing to pull him out and he wants to stay even though he hates it and Im not sure what exactly hes getting out of it.

I wish Id brought him home earlier. I wish Id had the confidence to do this earlier. :(

Im not a fan.

What is STEM? (I know I could hunt it up, I'm just tired...)

hockeymom
08-07-2012, 08:53 AM
Humanities families and STEM families need to do some swapping of students :)

Ha ha! Yes! What's up with genes that completely skip a generation?

Stella M
08-07-2012, 06:59 PM
I have a STEM boy...not sure how that's going to play out.

STEM - no idea what the letters stand for, I guess Science, Technology, maths and ?? But basically means a science and technology pathway.

Ayem
08-07-2012, 10:21 PM
I have a STEM boy...not sure how that's going to play out.

STEM - no idea what the letters stand for, I guess Science, Technology, maths and ?? But basically means a science and technology pathway.

Ah, that makes sense. I should have been able to work that out. Doh!

We have a direct split in my birth family a couple of STEM types and a couple of not. I'm a not.

My kids are both very much literary, arty, dreamy types. I'm trying to find a way into science and maths that doesn't turn them into STEM-phobics. I didn't realise how beautiful all those things could be until I was an adult.

Stella M
08-07-2012, 10:25 PM
OK, good luck. I have no advice as I failed miserably to excite either of my dd's about maths or science.

AmyButler
08-07-2012, 10:35 PM
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. You know, all those things I am weak in :) I would LOVE to find someone that I could trade Math and Science classes for Foreign Language, English and Lit! I would even throw in Logic and History to get someone who was comfortable with the STEM stuff to teach that!

crunchynerd
08-10-2012, 10:54 PM
I have a STEM boy...not sure how that's going to play out.

STEM - no idea what the letters stand for, I guess Science, Technology, maths and ?? But basically means a science and technology pathway.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths, I do believe.

Snowflake
08-11-2012, 08:23 PM
My kids were learning that school was a place where they didn't have to think. After a while they started shutting down and crying during our lessons at home every time I presented challenging material. It was horrible.

For all three years DS #1 was not in a reading group because he was such a good reader. DS #2 finally got a good teacher, but he started getting so silly (class clown) that he slipped out of the top reading group after a few months.

Ironically I knew we needed to homeschool when the boys were both placed with a good teacher.

slpmomof4
08-19-2012, 11:58 AM
Overall, it was a bad experience. Our children were not challenged academically. They were grading papers for the teachers while the other students completed their school work. There were many bullies, parents and kids. The teachers were required to teach to the tests. The unruly behavior of many of the students seem to rub off on the typically well-behaved kids. So, a great deal of deprogramming was necessary daily to keep my children well-mannered. (Seriously, when people ask me if I am concerned about my children being "socialized" since they are not in school. My response is "They are better socialized not being in school. They can formulate full sentences whether speaking with a child or an adult.") The school politics was outrageous. I could go on and on.