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View Full Version : A tad early - science for next fall



MrsLOLcat
07-11-2012, 09:11 PM
OK, all ye secular science-oriented folks, talk to me about middle school science curricula. I don't dislike science, but I never learned anything with any depth. Next fall my son will be in 5th grade. Yes, I do know I'm posting this really, really early but I want to have plenty of time to research, agonize over the decision, and choose. Anyway, DS adores science. He absorbs and assimilates information easily and quite often makes very insightful inferences based on previously-learned data. He is an auditory/visual learner and doesn't really feel that he has to see or do something to believe it, as long as there is enough hard evidence to back it up. This goes double for biology, since the idea of dissection of insects, worms, or amphibians makes him cry because those are the creatures he empathizes with (he's my Aspie, through and through). If I pick early enough, I should be able to work the budget to afford equipment to accompany the curriculum, so let's pretend that money isn't an object. I have been following a rough classical outline with our scientific studies so far, but I'm happy to switch to something less restrictive as long as I get all the topics covered again before we hit high school.

I will also be using this curriculum for my DD, but I can adapt anything to make it easier for her; it's much harder for me to go the other way and make a less meaty curriculum more difficult.

Suggestions? Fire away.

lynne
07-12-2012, 09:49 AM
I've been looking at Science Fusion for my boys. It looks great for visual learners. I think I may order a unit to try but I'm waiting to find it on sale.

sparky
07-12-2012, 12:55 PM
I use Teach With Cartoons: Science made easy. It's the whole curriculum in comics. My son loves it. I love it that he can do it independently. I just download the worksheets for each day, and he reads the comics, answers the questions and takes some quizzes. www.teachwithcartoons.com
I'm looking for an easy math program. I need something simple as my son struggles with math. Please let me know if you have a good one.

skrink
07-13-2012, 03:37 PM
We really like Ellen McHenry's The Elements, The Brain, and Cells. http://www.ellenjmchenrydownloads.com/ There are activities that we don't do but the info is interesting and engaging, and not fluffy science-lite. She has other things on her website, including free downloads, that are worth checking out. Warning: Not a totally religion free environment, but I haven't been put off by it (and I'm usually very touchy about such things).

dbmamaz
07-13-2012, 03:47 PM
i didnt start homeschooling until 8th grade, and we first went through this book (http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Arts-Guide-Science-Connecting/dp/0787983268/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1342208369&sr=8-1&keywords=dr+art%27s+guide+to+science) and then started on this bio textbook (http://www.amazon.com/Biology-Concepts-Connections-MasteringBiology-Edition/dp/0321742311/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1342208690&sr=1-1) (well, it wasnt that edition, but i figured an old textbook, cheap and used, was fine for now). - but my older son's reading level was always crazy high

Middle school science in my bookmarks includes Jason project (http://www.jason.org/public/whatis/start.aspx) (partly by Nat Geo) and this free chem curriculum (http://www.middleschoolchemistry.com/). There is also intellego unit studies as an option

RubyRain
08-08-2012, 07:30 PM
i didnt start homeschooling until 8th grade, and we first went through this book (http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Arts-Guide-Science-Connecting/dp/0787983268/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1342208369&sr=8-1&keywords=dr+art%27s+guide+to+science) and then started on this bio textbook (http://www.amazon.com/Biology-Concepts-Connections-MasteringBiology-Edition/dp/0321742311/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1342208690&sr=1-1) (well, it wasnt that edition, but i figured an old textbook, cheap and used, was fine for now). - but my older son's reading level was always crazy high

Middle school science in my bookmarks includes Jason project (http://www.jason.org/public/whatis/start.aspx) (partly by Nat Geo) and this free chem curriculum (http://www.middleschoolchemistry.com/). There is also intellego unit studies as an option

Thanks for the ideas-the first book looks great.

We are going to do Plato Physical Science this fall and then 2 of the Science Fusion modules in the spring. This is for my 8th grader. This is his prep/review science year before the high school science plan of biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science of some type.

Prior to this we used the Prentice Hall Science Explorer series and the kids liked them well enough. You could do them in any order you wanted which worked well with their interests. I think there are 8 books in the series?
There are lab videos you can get to go with the too.
You can get them cheap used:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_19?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=prentice+hall+science+explorer&sprefix=Prentice+hall+scien%2Caps%2C312

dragonfly
08-08-2012, 08:10 PM
There are some virtual dissection programs out there, like http://www.digitalfrog.com/products/frog.html, which you can get at Homeschool Buyer's Co-op (https://www.homeschoolbuyersco-op.org/digital-frog/?source=48640) for less.

It could be a good way to experience dissection without having to work on an actual animal. (Even if the empathy wasn't an issue, the stench of an actual dissection is enough to consider the virtual route. Yuck. It took us days to get the smell out of our noses.)