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Topsy
06-15-2010, 02:19 PM
http://www.corestandards.org/

Where in the heck have I BEEN? I only just came across this site today via a homeschooler's blog post. Wow. I'm constantly surprised by our educational powers-that-be's neverending quest to "standardize" every %$#@ thing. Obviously, standardized tests weren't enough, so now it is onward and upward....

Holy crud!! :mad:

MamaB2C
06-15-2010, 02:25 PM
I had pretty thoroughly reviewed that a few months back, and it's not as bad as you think. In fact, it might be a good thing for those states participating.

The "standards" aren't really specific benchmarks, like test scores, they're more like common sense educational goals such as


The ability to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence is a cornerstone of the writing standards, with opinion writing—a basic form of argument—extending down into the earliest grades.

An important focus of the speaking and listening standards is academic discussion in one-on-one, small-group, and whole-class settings. Formal presentations are one important way such talk occurs, but so is the more informal discussion that takes place as students collaborate to answer questions, build understanding, and solve problems.

The high school standards call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real world issues and challenges; they prepare students to think and reason mathematically.

Also, it's a states initiative, not the Fed government

StartingOver
06-15-2010, 04:31 PM
I had pretty thoroughly reviewed that a few months back, and it's not as bad as you think. In fact, it might be a good thing for those states participating.

The "standards" aren't really specific benchmarks, like test scores, they're more like common sense educational goals such as

Also, it's a states initiative, not the Fed government

I agree, I was very pleased with the standards. I was expecting something off the wall. It really could be a good thing for America to have a "standard" as many states don't seem to come close to these.

Snoopy
06-15-2010, 06:25 PM
Topsy, you were in NYC when we discussed it there (http://www.secularhomeschool.com/threads/625-New-Standards-for-Education). I think the intent is to make it easier for kids moving from one state to another by standardizing what is being studied in each grade at the federal level. While I don't particularly like homogeneity in everything, I agree with the previous posters about it being a good thing, actually. If anything, I'm hoping it will improve the quality of the Florida schools, as we always hear how much better schools are "up North". (Well, we always hear about how everything is much better up North, we even have a bumper sticker that states "I don't care how to do it "Up North!" lol. Not me, I don't do bumper stickers.) I strive for Noah to meet or exceed the standards and right now it looks like he is.

Topsy
06-15-2010, 06:52 PM
Topsy, you were in NYC when we discussed it

Oh...so THAT's where I've been...:o ((embarrassed shrug))

pandahoneybee
06-16-2010, 09:09 AM
Wow That might be good for some kids. Alex had 3 different schools in 5 years in 3 different states (moving down the street is for wussies! jk) And he had alot of gaps in what he knew when I bought him home to homeschool. He was technically in the 6th grade but we went back to 4th grade math to figure out the gaps!

SunshineKris
06-16-2010, 01:44 PM
I long for the day that states have the same standards. I may be in the minority who wish the Federal Gov't sets school minimum standards. We move often and it is so difficult for the kids in school. Our biggest fear was we'd be in a school district that had their own standards, then we'd move to somewhere else where they'd tell us our kids hadn't met the criteria to be placed into their grade level. It happened to my cousins when moving from Alabama to NJ. They were all held back a year because they were deemed "behind."

While I like a standard that applies to every state, every school district, I do think there needs to be a local government class. So many people stay in one area their whole lives and it's important to know how not only the federal government works but also your state and local gov't. And state history too.

hjdong
07-07-2010, 11:39 PM
I'm also a fan of the idea of national standards (although I will admit that I haven't perused these thoroughly enough to give an educated opinion). However, no one loves me at hs functions if I say it, so I usually bite my tongue.

mommykicksbutt
07-08-2010, 06:46 AM
I too think a national standard is a good thing, so did Thomas Jefferson but others at his time disagreed. Having grown up in the military and now so are my children, it would have been nice for all the schools to be on the same sheet of music as we moved from one state to another - from school to school. I was always playing catch-up. Doing ancient history in social studies in one school to American history in the next for the same school year! Argh! No wonder that the only thing I ever learned in those years I taught myself though reading.

jab300
07-08-2010, 10:11 AM
This is great for public schools. From a homeschooler's point of view, not so much. I wouldn't want these standards forced on our schooling.

QueenBee
07-26-2010, 01:30 PM
I agree with Julie... I wonder how this will affect homeschoolers.

Edited to say: I guess I'll find out as my state recently adopted them!!

MamaB2C
07-26-2010, 05:11 PM
It won't affect anything in my state, as they treat homeschooling as a religious issue, totally hands off.

Busygoddess
07-26-2010, 05:58 PM
I don't see anything wrong with the standards. They seem pretty basic to me. I also think national standards are a good idea. I know that makes me very unpopular with certain groups of homeschoolers, but I don't really care. It would be a good thing to have all public schools in all states working toward the same goals.
It shouldn't affect homeschoolers in my state. We're considered private schools. Therefore, we aren't subjected to the standards & rules of the public schools. We are required to provide an education that is comparable (or better) to that provided by the public school district, not to follow the ps scope, sequence, and standards. Even if national standards would affect me, I still wouldn't care, at least with these standards. Really, the only thing that would bother me would be my kids having to do standardized tests or for me to have to do a lot of reporting/getting approval/paperwork.

dottieanna29
07-27-2010, 09:19 AM
My state (NJ) adopted the new standards but they don't seem all that different than the standards we already have. I think it's mainly a good thing. It doesn't really tell the schools how they have to teach, just the basic skills/concepts they need to cover. I think it will help students who move around a lot.

Although, I have found that changing school districts even within a state there can be a lot of variation. My oldest changed schools for high school - from a mediocre district to one that is in the top 5 in the state. There were definite variations in how/when things were taught.

I doubt this will affect homeschoolers in NJ much since we literally do not have to do anything except provide an "equivalent education". With no reporting, testing, portfolio or any other requirements - it's open to a lot of interpretation.

Stages
07-27-2010, 10:54 AM
Huh, apparently Mississippi adopted these in June.
I think it could be a good thing for us- we're likely to move to whoknowswhere in the next several years, and I'd like to have a general idea of what grade level work she's doing. Plus, in case she does ever transition to public school, I'd like to make sure she's completely prepared.

laundrycrisis
07-27-2010, 11:22 AM
I like that the states can adopt them - and perhaps contribute to them - and it is not something being handed down and mandated by the federal government.

Busygoddess
07-27-2010, 03:03 PM
Although, I have found that changing school districts even within a state there can be a lot of variation. My oldest changed schools for high school - from a mediocre district to one that is in the top 5 in the state. There were definite variations in how/when things were taught.



I've also found this to be true. I attended 3 high schools, transferring during the school year both times. I actually had to retake some classes because they switched me into completely different classes when I transferred from one school to the next. I ended up redoing stuff in 2nd semester at one school, that I had done in 1st semester at the previous school, missing entire chunks of classes, etc. All 3 high schools were in the same state & 2 of them in the same city.

schwartzkari
07-28-2010, 12:51 AM
I've also found this to be true. I attended 3 high schools, transferring during the school year both times. I actually had to retake some classes because they switched me into completely different classes when I transferred from one school to the next. I ended up redoing stuff in 2nd semester at one school, that I had done in 1st semester at the previous school, missing entire chunks of classes, etc. All 3 high schools were in the same state & 2 of them in the same city.

This happened to me in elementary school. I was transferred to 2 different schools because the school district lines were "redone." In the middle of 4th grade, I was transferred to a new school in the next neighborhood and ended up having to get a tutor because my new 4th grade class was working on division. My old 4th grade class was just learning multiplication.

Busygoddess
07-28-2010, 02:11 AM
This happened to me in elementary school. I was transferred to 2 different schools because the school district lines were "redone." In the middle of 4th grade, I was transferred to a new school in the next neighborhood and ended up having to get a tutor because my new 4th grade class was working on division. My old 4th grade class was just learning multiplication.

I would be so angry if that happened to my kid. I was angry when it happened to me in high school, and I was mad that my parents weren't upset at all. I had to retake Health class. Do you know how ridiculous that looks? If it was my fault, that would be one thing. It wasn't my fault, though. My school was incapable of thinking "Ok. She was in P.E. in the school she's transferring from, and P.E. and Health are only 1 semester each in Freshman year. So, we should put her in P.E. to finish out 1st semester & have her take Health 2nd semester." Instead, the geniuses at my school decided to put me in Health for 1/2 the course, knowing that it would mean I would have to retake the class the following year no matter how good my grades were or how I did on the final. I was livid. I also had to retake a semester of an English class because school 3 decided not to give me credit for work done at school 2 before the transfer, but only in English.

nicole b
07-29-2010, 07:03 PM
The last I heard Texas is not going to sign on with this. Also, some of the states that have signed on are rethinking and taking the state off the list. There is federal money involved if the states sign on although not sure how much the federal government will say on states rights.

MamaB2C
07-30-2010, 12:22 AM
I knew Texas and Alaska did not participate, but I had not heard of states pulling out. Do you have a link or source where I can find out more about that?

I know states that adopt it will get extra points for Race to the Top , but I don't believe there will be direct funds.

AL lost points because we have no charter school law amongst other things, and therefore cannot compete as well, for an example of various items that are awarded points.