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View Full Version : shocking and completely creepy and utterly disturbing



Deli76
05-26-2012, 02:52 AM
i cant remember the rules for posting a link, please forgive me...but i had to post this to prove another reason to homeschool.....

http://www.ksat.com/news/New-NISD-program-will-track-students-on-campus/-/478452/14196216/-/ph1fw0z/-/index.html

Pawz4me
05-26-2012, 08:25 AM
Wow. Big Brother truly is watching . . .

farrarwilliams
05-26-2012, 08:48 AM
Even beyond the obvious creepy monitoring aspects, what a huge waste of money. I can't even imagine the economics of their justification - half a million, but they expect 2 million back? How does that make sense?

Jeni
05-26-2012, 08:50 AM
I think its a great idea. Dh spends a lot of his time picking up kids and taking them back to school when they are out and about during the school day. He said even little, little kids will just walk off grounds. I would think if they are able to save the info, go back and look where a kid has been, it would cut down on violence. It might help in sexual assult claims too.

farrarwilliams
05-26-2012, 09:12 AM
I guess I assume that if high school kids don't want to be there, there's only so much you can do. This seems like a system that would be pretty easy to fool (it's on a card, not implanted in your body). For younger kids, obviously there's a safety issue if they wander away, but what I had read about these things previously is that they don't work very far beyond the school grounds... I would think even most 8 yo could figure out that to leave, you ditch the card and get as far away as possible as fast as possible. And then the electronic monitoring is over.

Riceball_Mommy
05-26-2012, 10:50 AM
I can understand the idea of safety, but with the kids that wander off grounds, cameras or even staff by the exits would probably cost less money. It's useless if they wander off, they can't be tracked outside the school. Also a kid could shove the card into a desk or under a chair, and ask to use the bathroom then go anywhere.

Mainly I agree with Farrar, it's a lot of money to be spending on something like this.

It'sallgood
05-26-2012, 11:57 AM
Very slippery slope. It may be on a card now, not implanted, but it's just a matter of time. We plant chips into our pets "for their safety", it would take just another few years of this sort of shenanigans for the idea of implanting kids to be not so shocking. Especially after a number of kids keep forgetting their cards, or losing them, and the parents get sick of paying the replacement fee (which btw, could steadily increase, to put the pressure on the argument for implantation). It's just too 1984-ish.

Deli76
05-26-2012, 12:09 PM
to me, the tracking is just creepy and uncalled for. the money aspect does not make any sense. this is the wealthy district in our area. they could have used the money to hire more teachers due to the fact that they are short teachers in their district, and they are also short on classrooms as well. i dont understand the reasoning behind it.

Munchie33
05-26-2012, 12:11 PM
I read a similar one a few years ago... A school rented out laptops to its teachers and students for the year, but failed to mention that the laptops all had software installed which not only kept track of what the students and teachers were doing on the laptops (e.g. which websites they viewed) but also recorded what the webcam was viewing at all times. So if a kid left their laptop idle while they got changed or something in their bedroom... Naturally, the school backpedaled frantically and explained that that was not their intention, but the lack of foresight and the number of laws broken is astounding.

These things are often a good idea, but there are so many creepy things that can go wrong that we have to stop and think if they're worth it. A lot of the time they aren't.

koalaborg
05-26-2012, 12:19 PM
this is my school district. yikes. I think the intention could be in the right place (maybe) but its definitely creepy and could lead to a lot more intrusive monitoring.

Amanadoo
05-26-2012, 12:43 PM
Nooooooo! That's completely asinine and CRAZY. Ca-razy. Kids "wandering off" from a regular school is such a huge problem that they need to be tracked like reindeer in the arctic? What? I hope that this place goes dead broke, immediately. Shame, shame, shame.

AmyButler
05-26-2012, 01:10 PM
I can see benefits to this only in the case of disastors (both natural and man-made), and only if the card was on the child.

farrarwilliams
05-26-2012, 01:28 PM
That laptop case from last year was one of the most disturbing things I've ever heard of a school doing, Munchie.

bcnlvr
05-26-2012, 04:45 PM
They are all being monitored already, by their cell phones. lol

Mom2Nathan
05-26-2012, 05:11 PM
That... is just crazy. I agree with one of the comments saying about how they're just trying to get kids ready and use to this for adulthood. There are a million reasons why monitor and control can be good, but then there are a million and one reasons why it's just completely nuts. I see nothing about what happens if they kids do skip. They take roll every day, obviously if so many days are missed, the parents are notified anyway, so I fail to see how this is actually going to help anything. If a kid is going to skip, he's going to skip, period. My father let me skip, if I didn't feel like going, I didn't go, and when I took what I considered vacation days every now and then, my grades went up dramatically. All this need to control just needs to stop. As much as I love reading dystopian fiction, I don't want to live one.

Stella M
05-26-2012, 06:20 PM
I actually don't find it shocking, considering the amount of info we, as a culture, are giving out to corporations willingly.

In that context, it actually makes total sense that we would track our students in this way. Same way big business is tracking us - our whereabouts, our preferences...

Do I agree with it ? I agree with it about as much as I'd like to live inside 1984...

Deli76
05-26-2012, 08:24 PM
ive see 2 references about 1984...i dont understand?? i wasnt even 10 at the time. :confused:

Stella M
05-26-2012, 08:26 PM
It's a book. A pretty famous book. George Orwell.

theWeedyRoad
05-26-2012, 08:27 PM
ive see 2 references about 1984...i dont understand?? i wasnt even 10 at the time. :confused:

The references are to the book 1984, about a future world where 'big brother is watching', doublethink, etc etc. Really a must-read (that and Brave New World)




***sorry, missed that Stella already said this!

Stella M
05-26-2012, 08:47 PM
WeedyRoad said it nicer :)

Orwell was a British writer, so maybe not studied as routinely as he is in the UK or Australia.

Munchie33
05-26-2012, 11:43 PM
I don't have any problem with giving out my information online or to corporations etc. since I'm voluntarily doing it. If there was an option not to give out such info to schools, e.g. parents could choose whether or not their kid is tracked, that would be okay. But to do it without someone's knowledge is pretty sick.

I'm not paranoid or a conspiracy theorist. That said, I do teach my kids that anything they ever write or type can potentially be put on the front page of the newspaper. A facebook comment I made once ended up in the crappy local paper (shoddy reporting, I know) and was a lovely example to use: never write anything you don't want to be held accountable for. You read about it everyday. People losing their jobs etc. because they posted something ridiculous on twitter. Maybe it's my distant catholic ancestors that make me this prudent :p

Gabriela
05-27-2012, 11:00 AM
I think it's ridiculous. What's going to stop a kid from just leaving the id card in the bathroom and ditching school anyway?

farrarwilliams
05-27-2012, 12:45 PM
Beyond just the 1984/Brave New Worldiness of it, that would be my main objection, Gabriela. Any system that can be fooled by dropping your id card in a toilet is clearly not worth half a million dollars.

crunchynerd
06-23-2012, 09:25 AM
You can get people to accept nearly anything, through habituation. First it's the card, until everyone feels comfortable with it. Then, the realization that cards are not as effective, and can be lost. Once people no longer have a negative emotional response to the card and that level of surveillance, it doesn't take too long to move from that, to something more permanent, using the arguments "it's optional; you can opt out [for now!]" and "but it's a matter of safety! It's FOR THE CHILDREN!" (and whoever stands against that, is a rotten person or a wannabe lawbreaker!)

Freedom only exists as long as people are actively fighting to protect it. Complacency is all it takes for totalitarianism to take root. The big problem with habituation is, people tend to pooh-pooh little invasions as not worth getting worked up over. By the time the little tendrils become large woody vines, it's too late; you can't shake them off anymore.

TriciaJ
06-23-2012, 09:15 PM
Great, another bandaid to try and remedy a problem instead of prevention. Not to mention expensive, does this school actually have $? And apparently alot of it. What is going to happen to this country??? Let all of this craziness, greed and dysfunction collapse!

Sionnon
06-25-2012, 10:55 AM
They had these kind of ID badges in an episode of the t.v. show Numbe3rs. The students had ID badges that showed exactly who was where when. The episode used them to track the movements of the students during an attack in the school. Although it was useful for case solving in a T.V. show, it seems like an overall waste of money to me.

bcnlvr
06-25-2012, 11:00 AM
Reason #423. :)