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View Full Version : OK Spelling ,whats your poison?



pandahoneybee
06-11-2010, 10:07 AM
Hi Everyone!

I am having such a hard time with the boys in improving their spelling! Going into 3rd and 8th grades, and they well SUCK at spelling. I have tried alot of online programs, writing the words so many times their hands hurt and all about spelling. I have to admit something though I SUCK as well, thank the smart people who invented spell check! DH says just over and over will help them, but I am wondering if any of you have used something either online(preferred) or workbooks that really really helps.
Sorry if I already posted this, mind is going;)

So whats your poison?

jessicalb
06-11-2010, 10:18 AM
I've read that correcting spelling in their writing and having them read good books with good vocabulary are the best ways to help kids learn spelling.

That said, we've used spelling workbooks, but we do almost all the work out loud. The only pages I actually had Alex write the answers on were the editing pages. We also skipped lessons where he already knew the words and just went over the really weird ones, where I thought he probably hadn't run across those words in his reading.

I think exposure to new words plus using them in writing is the ideal way to learn those words. I will also often have him type his assignments in notebook instead of Word so he doesn't have spellcheck to help him. ;)

warramra
06-11-2010, 10:32 AM
Michelle

My children are pretty horrible spellers too. Of course they come by it honestly. I could remember spelling words well enough to pass a test, but then completely spell them wrong when writing. My spelling improved over time just through writing, so after trying several different programs with the older girls I've decided to go that way with them. I see it working when the words they can spell are ones they have developed through writing and asking me how to spell it for them.

I just ordered a Franklin Speller (http://www.amazon.com/Franklin-Electronics-NCS-101-SPELLING-CORRECTOR/dp/1567120709/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1276262811&sr=8-2) for them to use when writing away from a computer.

There is also http://www.spellingcity.com/ online, but my girls have never really enjoyed it all that much. And, if you are writing you can always use an online dictionary (http://www.merriam-webster.com/) and it will give the correct spelling with definition.

Amy

Wilma
06-11-2010, 11:20 AM
My kids aced spelling programs but could not put it into practice when writing. Once they started writing, things improved. My youngest, however, is a different story. We are going to use Sequential Spelling with her because I think she will do better with something that deals with patterns as opposed to rules. We'll see.

hockeymom
06-11-2010, 12:14 PM
I'm so glad to see this post. I was up much of the night last night stressing about this very thing. It's been like pulling teeth around here trying to get my son to write anything--he claims he doesn't like to write and it frustrates him that he can't spell all the words correctly (and doesn't so much like me to spell it for him, unless he asks).

When he was in ps, the teachers (K and 1) actually told the kids they CAN'T spell yet--that is, they won't be able to--so they should use "kid spell". Basically, they didn't want to teach kids to spell correctly and so they gave themselves an "out" but in the process they taught the kids that incorrect spelling is okay. Well, it isn't to us! But I have no idea how to go about correcting it.

Yesterday I read a blog post about having their unschooled kids write a brief report about their day every evening. I thought maybe that would be a good, practical way to get a bit of writing in, with the understanding that good handwriting should be stressed. I thought I might use copy work to start, that is, have him tell me 3 (educational) things he did that day and write his answers down for him, then have him copy the sentences. I can see that it could start simply and get more detailed as we go on through the year, with the hope that in time he'll want to write the sentences himself. I'd never heard of copy work before reading TWTM, but I love the idea and think this might be a place we can apply it. I'm going to print out some lined paper for him for his journal, so he can also work on handwriting (which is atrocious).

Has anyone used copy work as a way to help improve spelling?

hjdong
06-11-2010, 12:35 PM
I do copywork. I don't know, honestly, if it improves his spelling or not. I've used The Arrow, from Bravewriter, and it gives you suggestions to things to talk about, grammar, spelling patterns, etc. So, in the passage he's working on right now, there's a lot of double consonant words; I point them out, remind him, before he starts copying. That said, his spelling is terrible. We use just a Spectrum workbook and I've found the thing that helps the most is consistency on my part. Spelling used to be one of those things that would get dropped if we were too busy, now I make sure he does it everyday. I'm seeing slow, extremely slow, improvement. I don't think it's anyone thing necessarily, but more the consistency.

Marmalade
06-11-2010, 02:06 PM
Spelling is tricky...we have so many rules that we have to follow!

We use Spellingcity.com for both of my daughters and a spelling workbook for one of them because she has trouble with spelling. Also, we tried to implement a spelling notebook where I have a few pages of spelling rules and then pages of blank paper for them to write down their trouble words. I haven't expected much improvement this year, since it's our first year out of public school...but I have high hopes for next year.

This is one of the charts that we have. I really like it a lot.
http://printables.scholastic.com/printables/detail/?id=30638

One suggestion I would give is to have them use this chart when figuring out how a word is spelled. There are a few other printable ones that I've found but for some reason I can't find them right now.

Topsy
06-11-2010, 04:07 PM
Spelling just comes naturally to my oldest...it always did to me, too. It does NOT come naturally to my youngest, who also has dyslexia. We have tried everything with him. Sequential Spelling, DAVIS Dyslexia program for spelling, SpellingCity. None helped all that much, although SpellingCity at least makes the practice fun!! We did a remediation program 2 years ago called "Saxon Phonics Remediation" that probably made the biggest difference so far. It was designed for anyone in grades 4 and up who needed remediation in phonics/spelling. It was a great program, actually, and he definitely learned a lot by doing it. Only took about 15-20 minutes a day. Other than that, I don't have a lot of advice, gal. Sorry!!

laundrycrisis
06-11-2010, 04:10 PM
Our 7 yo is using Click'n Spell, Spelling Workout, and Scholastic Daily Word Ladders. He is younger though.

Snoopy
06-11-2010, 04:49 PM
Spelling is a lot about practicing and repetition. Although there are rules, a lot of words are spelled the way they are because they evolved that way, or because they come from another language. French is infamous for being hard on spellers because we use a lot of extra letters that don't even get pronounced. We had dictation in Kindergarten and in every grade through 5th grade. I always was an excellent speller and I think it's because I read so much. I agree that having the child read a lot is very helpful, but the child also needs to practice spelling words. Playing hangman or other word games can help. Noah loves playing Scribblenauts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scribblenauts) on his Nintendo DS. If he plays it in the car, he will ask me how to spell a word for an object that he wants to appear in his game, but I always ask him how HE thinks it is spelled and have him type it in the game. The game will suggest other words (kind of like spell check) if it can't find it in his database. Later on I will ask him to spell the words for me again verbally to check that he has retained them.

I know people use Explode the Code for reading but I always used it for spelling. In Kindergarden and 1st grade I gave Noah lists of spelling words (Explode the Code was great for practicing writing and decoding the words). I also used Evan Moor's Building Spelling Skills Grade 2 and started quizzing him on the words every day but stopped pretty fast because the words were too easy. We only used Sequential Spelling for about half the year. I like the idea of it but in practicality I found it kind of boring and sometimes I was having a hard time thinking of a sentence to showcase the word (I like to use the word in a sentence when I ask him to spell it so we practice vocabulary at the same time). They have an e- book that you can purchase (or get for free if you become a member of their organization) that has sentences for the various lists, but they don't have sentences for every word, something that I find weird.

I ended up switching to just using blogging as a tool for Language Arts practice. Noah gets to practice various types of writing (which, don't get me wrong, he HATES like every boy I have ever met from my brothers down to all my own boys!), paragraph editing, punctuation, grammar, vocabulary, and spelling. He types the draft into Blogger but I have not shown him the Spell Check function (which catches words that ARE spelled properly anyway, for some reason!). Once he is done typing the draft, I copy it into MS Word and change the spacing to 3 lines and print it for him. Then I ask him to edit it for grammar, punctuation, vocabulary (using different words, practicing using new words that we learned,etc.) and spelling. I check his edits and show him my own and then I have him make all the corrections into Blogger before we publish his posts. I also agree that copywork is a good exercise. We use copywork once in a while to practice all of the above and handwriting. We started on cursive back in April and we use copywork for cursive a lot, and also for spelling while we're at it.

I don't agree that kids should be left to spell the way they want to. I think it must be very hard, afterwards, to agree to follow the rules! I think that each child should be shown how to spell each word properly from the very beginning but then not all words can/should be taught at the same levels. Some kids will need more practice than others, but everyone needs practice. Even I, and I consider myself an excellent speller, forget how to spell a word if I haven't had to use it for a while. My French spelling, for example, is atrocious. I truly am ashamed because I always was recognized for my excellent spelling but now even my mom makes fun of me!

On a side note, I thought that the people who protested the Scripps' Spelling Bee finale to convince people to adopt easier spelling rules were weird.

pandahoneybee
06-11-2010, 09:05 PM
Spelling just comes naturally to my oldest...it always did to me, too. It does NOT come naturally to my youngest, who also has dyslexia. We have tried everything with him. Sequential Spelling, DAVIS Dyslexia program for spelling, SpellingCity. None helped all that much, although SpellingCity at least makes the practice fun!! We did a remediation program 2 years ago called "Saxon Phonics Remediation" that probably made the biggest difference so far. It was designed for anyone in grades 4 and up who needed remediation in phonics/spelling. It was a great program, actually, and he definitely learned a lot by doing it. Only took about 15-20 minutes a day. Other than that, I don't have a lot of advice, gal. Sorry!!
Sure rub it in! Ms Spelling Comes Naturally;) We might have to try the remediation in phonice and spelling maybe it will help me too;0

pandahoneybee
06-11-2010, 09:11 PM
Wow thanks everyone! I knew that I wasn't the only one, but seeing how my spelling was always bad (because I am dyslexic too) so I know where some of the kids are coming from! Ok just tell me am I sharing too much! I am going to take a look at all of the cool things everyone posted and give them a try. If I am nothing else, I am DETERMINED!

Topsy
06-11-2010, 10:59 PM
Sure rub it in! Ms Spelling Comes Naturally;) We might have to try the remediation in phonice and spelling maybe it will help me too;0

Hey...I think I like that better than Topsy...shall I change my username to "Ms. SCN"??!! :rolleyes: I got the name of the program a little wrong, though...it is "Saxon Phonics Intervention."

pandahoneybee
06-12-2010, 08:38 PM
Hey...I think I like that better than Topsy...shall I change my username to "Ms. SCN"??!! :rolleyes: I got the name of the program a little wrong, though...it is "Saxon Phonics Intervention."

Ok I will knight you Ms SCN and it is so!

Dana
06-13-2010, 12:47 PM
We started first grade with Spelling Workout. It seemed to work. In second grade, I started noticing more problems. The biggest one was that my son didn't have an understanding of phonics since he's basically self-taught for reading. I made the switch to All About Spelling (http://www.all-about-spelling.com/), started at Level 1, and it's been a GREAT change! It's helping his prononciation of names as well and I'm noticing him sounding out words when he writes on his own. His spelling has improved dramatically and I'm very very pleased with the program.

pandahoneybee
06-13-2010, 02:02 PM
HI Dana~
WE also have All About Spelling, I do like it but it seems like it takes us forever to get thru. How long do you spend on it per day? I would love for my kiddos to sound the words out, thanks;)

StartingOver
06-13-2010, 02:15 PM
We started first grade with Spelling Workout. It seemed to work. In second grade, I started noticing more problems. The biggest one was that my son didn't have an understanding of phonics since he's basically self-taught for reading. I made the switch to All About Spelling (http://www.all-about-spelling.com/), started at Level 1, and it's been a GREAT change! It's helping his prononciation of names as well and I'm noticing him sounding out words when he writes on his own. His spelling has improved dramatically and I'm very very pleased with the program.

I love hearing this, I am going to order AAS soon. I think it will be wonderful for spelling and a great review of phonics at the same time.

Dana
06-13-2010, 02:44 PM
HI Dana~
WE also have All About Spelling, I do like it but it seems like it takes us forever to get thru. How long do you spend on it per day? I would love for my kiddos to sound the words out, thanks;)

When we did the switch last year, we probably spent about >30 or so minutes. Setting up the tiles on the board took quite a while - and I learned which letters my son wasn't able to put in alphabetical order (eek!).
We've just started setting the timer and working for 15-20 minutes daily. We only set up the tiles once a week or every other week. I hand a tile at random to my son; he says the phonogram sounds and puts the tile on the board in alphabetical order.

Then we do whatever part of the lesson we're on. We'll generally start with a brief review if we have key cards we're reviewing. Then I'll do any teaching and work on tile spelling or on written spelling and dictation.
I'm working at keeping a closer eye on the timer and STOPPING when we're at the 15-20 min instead of "just one more thing..." :)

For us, I think the daily work and the timer help. We also really had a few issues at first and had to go slowly over the segmenting of words. When I have my son spell with the tiles, I have him segment the sounds as he pulls down the tiles. I think that has probably made the greatest difference. Now when he asks me how to spell a word, I ask him to segment it and listen to the sounds.

pandahoneybee
06-13-2010, 05:04 PM
Thanks Dana! At least if I know that it has worked for someone else I can push thru it! I am going to set the timer! Thanks;)

Sarbare0704
06-13-2010, 05:14 PM
Those of you that use the All About Spelling What age/ skill level do you recommend starting that at? It looks like a cool program!

Dana
06-13-2010, 06:29 PM
Those of you that use the All About Spelling What age/ skill level do you recommend starting that at? It looks like a cool program!

I started in 2nd grade, but I wish I had known about the program and started in 1st.
Definitely start at Level 1.
My son was already reading pretty fluently when we started. I don't know when I'd start it without reading...but still start with Level 1 - and probably during first grade. Their site has discussions as well for each level and they can probably give more information as well.

elkhollow
06-13-2010, 09:08 PM
We have used All About Spelling also. I liked it very much and I think it would be advantageous to a child who is struggling with reading and/or spelling. It is not the type of program that a student can do mostly independently after a few minutes of instruction, though. It will require your time through the entire lesson, but it is very worth it for the struggling student. I switched to a program that Ce Ce can do more on her own because there are subjects in which she does struggle and needs more guidance from me, but spelling isn't one of them. The website may help you decide which level you need. I would recommend that you go lower than you may think you need to. You can always skip forward or go more quickly through familiar material.
HTH

pandahoneybee
06-18-2010, 11:50 AM
Ok I found another spelling possibility, Spelling Power (http://www.castlemoyle.com/shopping/spelling/spellingpower.htm). So has anyone checked this out?

darkelf
06-06-2014, 07:01 PM
I have used Power Spelling in the past with my 3 older boys. They liked and I liked it and their spelling soared. My 3rd has dysgraphia and often the spelling on the list wouldn't translate to writing, BUT he has become a great editor.
I was planning on starting #4 on Spelling this year and I'll be honest AAS has all the bells and whistles and it very tempting.

freerangedad
06-06-2014, 07:34 PM
Yes, I was surprised not to see Spelling Power as I read through the thread. The best thing about Spelling Power is that it teaches a studying technique that works very well. My DD is a very good speller. I don't know how much to attribute to Spelling Power. (We make a good team. I know what the word means, and she knows how to spell it.)

darkelf
06-06-2014, 08:17 PM
Spelling Power worked well with my boys. They never complained about doing it. My 3rd got discouraged for a couple of weeks because he could not spell neighborhood once. (But he was so excited when he finally spelled it right. And he can still spell it today.)

Someone suggested AAS and it is tempting but we have Spelling Power and it worked in the past, I'm not sure I can justify the cost of a whole new program.

dbmamaz
06-06-2014, 08:20 PM
I guess this thread started 4 years ago, before I did spelling. I started with Spelling Power and it totally did not work for my youngest. We switched to Logic of English, which is more like All About Spelling, and it helped a lot for him

Kimberlapoderosa
06-06-2014, 09:56 PM
All about spelling has helped my DS 13. We started at level one even though he is older because he really needed to learn the spelling rules. We are moving quickly through the levels and focusing on his problem areas.

momto2js
06-08-2014, 12:47 PM
I recently attended a session put on by the writer of "spellright" I really liked the idea of improving spelling through the students own writing. It is worth looking into.

Avalon
06-08-2014, 04:17 PM
I quickly skimmed through the thread, and I don't think that anyone has mentioned Sequential Spelling. I love it. It's awesome. It's not babyish, so you can use it with ANY age, from 7 year olds to 17 year olds. No rules to memorize. No "tests." No endless exercises.

It's basically a book full of word lists based on The Patterns of English Spelling. You read aloud the list of words to the student, who attempts to write them down. You make any necessary corrections immediately. No marking or "scoring." One list per day and they include lots of repetition. The kids just naturally and easily begin to recognize the patterns.

I've only ever had to use for a couple of months at a time, and each time I noticed marked improvement in their overall spelling.

CloverBee&Reverie
06-08-2014, 09:45 PM
I SECOND SEQUENTIAL SPELLING! We've used Sequential Spelling for 2 1/2 years and will continue with it indefinitely. We love it. We do 5-6 lists per week. We talk about & fix (if needed) the spelling words as we do the list (instead of do the list & then correct the words). DD has made vast improvements in her spelling. We tried so many other approaches but this one has stuck. We started with level 1, we're now in level 3. It was originally written as a spelling program for students with dyslexia. We're huge fans.

darkelf
08-18-2017, 07:34 PM
I quickly skimmed through the thread, and I don't think that anyone has mentioned Sequential Spelling. I love it. It's awesome. It's not babyish, so you can use it with ANY age, from 7 year olds to 17 year olds. No rules to memorize. No "tests." No endless exercises.

It's basically a book full of word lists based on The Patterns of English Spelling. You read aloud the list of words to the student, who attempts to write them down. You make any necessary corrections immediately. No marking or "scoring." One list per day and they include lots of repetition. The kids just naturally and easily begin to recognize the patterns.

I've only ever had to use for a couple of months at a time, and each time I noticed marked improvement in their overall spelling.

This sounds exactly like Spelling Power. I did get All About Spelling and we like it, it just takes so much time. I'm trying to trim time because of the older boys' sports. Last year when we didn't have sports we got so much done.

kmcentire
08-21-2017, 09:51 PM
We use the spelling curriculum from K12reader.com. You can get a reading comprehension worksheet to go with each week. They look up the definitions, and have daily drills. Then I make word searches and crossword puzzles on discoveryeducation.com/free-puzzlemaker/ Any word they missed during the drill they write 5 times.

If they are that bad, start them at the beginning. Set up a chart, If they can get 100% on a drill the first day move to the next list. Have some sort of incentive for them to finish each grade.