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Sherry
02-27-2012, 09:02 AM
If your child is advanced in one or more academic subjects, where do you go for advice about curricula, asynchrony, and other topics of concern? I know from dhs and my own educational experiences the results of not providing enough challenge. On the other hand, I do not want to push too hard.

I have found advice for parents of profoundly gifted/genius children, but not advice for parents of bright, probably, but not necessarily gifted children.

hockeymom
02-27-2012, 09:04 AM
Um, I come here of course! :)

dbmamaz
02-27-2012, 09:35 AM
for me, i reevaluate what we are doing constantly, trying to find the right balance for curriculum. I try to figure out what each kid needs in each area, and try to provide that. If you mean, is it ok to do every other problem, sure. Is it ok to let your kid zip through a years worth of math in 3 mo and go to the next level, sure.

Definitely ask us any questions, we love to chat. but also a lot of it is learning to trust your child and trust yourself, instead of trusting the curriculum or the norms.

farrarwilliams
02-27-2012, 09:53 AM
I don't have kids who are way ahead of grade level, but I'll point out that "that other forum" - aka, the Well-Trained Mind - has a whole "accelerated learners" subforum where I understand good advice is probably given. If you are put off by the Christian homeschoolers, just stay off the general board and I think you'll find it's no big deal. There are *lots* of secular types there - it's a pretty diverse board.

bcnlvr
02-27-2012, 10:01 AM
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/ saved my life. It was the jumping off point for all the other websites and forums for me.

Kirsji
02-27-2012, 10:03 AM
I can't help you with a particular "where to go" for advice, other than here, of course :), but I can offer a piece of what I do ...

My 12 year old is very good at math, loves math, and is eager to do his math every day. He is currently working on Algebra II and Geometry. He's almost done with Algebra and will move on the Pre-Cal in a few months.

Writing? Different story, altogether!
He hates (loathes!!) writing and probably writes at a fifth grade level. I just keep making him write every day and I don't really worry too much about where he stands, as long as he continues to practise each and every day and I am able to see 'some' improvement month by month. I make the curriculum work for HIM instead of making him work for the curriculum.

Trust yourself and your kids!


Homeschooling is about allowing your kids to excel in subjects they love and gently push them in subjects they don't love quite as much.

jar7709
02-27-2012, 04:23 PM
Besides some of the places PP's listed, I've found good advice in some of the links at Gifted Homeschoolers Forum (http://www.giftedhomeschoolers.org/homeschoolingresources.html), especially if you browse around their "resources" pages. A lot of that stuff is geared toward the highly gifted/genius end of the spectrum, but there's plenty of information on asynchrony and balancing issues that apply to most homeschoolers.

But really, many kids are ahead in one thing behind in others, whether "gifted" or not, and it's just like many othere areas where it's best to follow the kids' lead and once in a while back up a step if it seems like we missed something along the way. Hard to know in the moment what to do sometimes, though...what a ride, huh?

Sherry
02-27-2012, 04:51 PM
I don't have kids who are way ahead of grade level, but I'll point out that "that other forum" - aka, the Well-Trained Mind - has a whole "accelerated learners" subforum where I understand good advice is probably given. If you are put off by the Christian homeschoolers, just stay off the general board and I think you'll find it's no big deal. There are *lots* of secular types there - it's a pretty diverse board.

I find that board intimidating. Many of the parents are dealing with profoundly gifted children. The rest seem to consider actions/achievements I think of as normal to be extraordinary. My perception may be skewed since the only children I have regular contact with are my own. Maybe I need definitions of what is normal at each age/grade level?

farrarwilliams
02-27-2012, 05:32 PM
I think there's a range of normal, myself. I dunno... I guess I don't know what advice you need. We work slightly ahead on some subjects, slightly behind on others. I do feel like one can get the sense that one is in a vacuum trying to figure out what's "normal" for a certain grade/age. But that can be a blessing to. I try to focus on progress over placement, if that makes sense.

Sherry
02-27-2012, 06:17 PM
My not quite four year old is capable of reading Magic Tree House books. Not as fluently as his six-year old brother, but he can do it. He sits in all of his brother's lessons, by choice. He is not writing letters/words on paper, but has no problem forming letters on the HWOT slate. He does not suffer big brother's fine motor delays and in many ways exceeds his brother's skills - zippers, buttons, opening containers, constructing with Legos (he is a wiz at Lego building sets).

Sibling rivalry is already an issue. It will likely grow worse if/when he surpasses his brother academically. Big brother is bright. Little brother is likely even brighter. How do I deal with this?

findemerson
02-27-2012, 06:55 PM
My perception may be skewed since the only children I have regular contact with are my own. Maybe I need definitions of what is normal at each age/grade level?

I think age/grade level makes a difference completely...I mean, my 5yo is "ahead" in quite a few subjects...but he's a regular kid--he may be "gifted" or whatever but he's also had the exposure of being beside me and his big sister for the past 2yrs. So, he may level out in a year. If that makes sense. Plus, I've seen a lot of small kids who were "advanced" and then middle school or high school starts and they tend to be "on level"...However, if your kids are over 12-13yo and are a few grades ahead in one subject...the alternatives are different. Several HS'ers find taking a class at the community college or other things of that sort give them the challenge in that subject (or two) and the independence...of course..a 7yr doesn't need independence.... (oh I hope this makes sense)

You could look at CTT (connect the thoughts)....they have several reasonably priced courses for 1st-12th grade and you could buy some at, below or above...the samples are good enough to get a feel if you want to move up or down and the courses are really flexible..there should be some threads...somewhere around here if you search for them if you want some other opinions.

findemerson
02-27-2012, 07:03 PM
Sibling rivalry is already an issue. It will likely grow worse if/when he surpasses his brother academically. Big brother is bright. Little brother is likely even brighter. How do I deal with this?

I breathe. My 9yo daughter is not in any way, shape or form mentally prepared for her brother to be better than her. Her self-esteem is something we've been working on since I pulled her out of PS...her brother never went in (thank goodness)...but there it is...I ask her a question--she answers it wrong and there is the 5yo across the room, proudly chiming in the answer. *sigh*
I separate them...then at dinner or in the car or anywhere, really. He's at the "look at me--hear me roar" stage and she's entering adolescence and a worrywart.
I do find that separating subjects and getting them completely different curricula, helped. Also, I pushed crafts.. she has her own instrument and crafts(hobbies) that she learns that he learns his own. It went from all the time to hardly ever. Plus, I gave her the book "You're Smarter Than You Think" by Armstrong. This put a smile on her face and now she encourages him and asks him to join her..but for a while, I just..well..it was frustrating.

farrarwilliams
02-27-2012, 07:26 PM
Ooh, it's so hard. I have this with my twins. Yes. Separate curricula. Separate book series. Just keep emphasizing that everyone has their own gifts and talents and that hard work matters more in the end. Find ways for the child feeling lesser to find confidence (rock climbing does it for my boy!). I strongly hope that this will help both my guys be more well-rounded as adults in the end. More sure of themselves. But I feel like I have to constantly address it head on.

And remember that lots of kids read early like that and then slow down. He may not and he may always be a bit ahead. But many kids leap with reading and then don't significantly advance on it for a couple years. All the other critical thinking things have to catch up.

dbmamaz
02-27-2012, 08:31 PM
yeah, i was going to say that too - try to get really different curriculums for them, so they cant compare as easily

mine are several years apart, but its funny - several times in a row, they were doing similar math problems on the same day - fractions, percents, algebra word problems. just at really different levels. luckily they didnt seem to care.