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rosesandcreme
05-29-2010, 06:29 PM
One of the things I've noticed with a lot of homeschooling moms is that they are stay at home moms. Wondering how many moms on this forum have full time jobs or are business owners (like myself). How do you girls balance trying to take care of business and still find time to homeschool/spend time with kids? I find that my day usually starts around 4:45 am, and doesn't end until 9 or 10 at night, and I still need more hours in my day! :)

rosesandcreme
05-29-2010, 06:33 PM
Haha, just thought of something, I need to include Dads in this group too! As there are many dads homeschooling out there as well! :)

Shoe
05-29-2010, 07:16 PM
Haha, just thought of something, I need to include Dads in this group too! As there are many dads homeschooling out there as well! :)

Hi rosesandcreme,

I'm a homeschooling dad who currently works full time outside the home as well as being the primary educator. My day usually starts around 07:30 when we all get up, get dressed and have breakfast. I take my daughter to public school shortly after 08:00 hrs, then homeschool my son until around 14:00 (2:00 pm) when I head off to work a 15:00-01:00 shift in the emergency department. I get home and to bed somewhere between 02:00 and 03:00 am and catch a few winks before starting the process all over again.

Fortunately, there are a couple of days a week where I don't have to work outside the home (but I do work every second weekend) so I catch up on sleep a little on those days. I used to be a half owner in a small business as well (an occupational health screening company), but unfortunately, it wasn't successful in this current economic climate and we had to fold about 8 months ago.

My wife works full time in the public school system during the day (although she's been off because of an injury for awhile), so we don't see a lot of each other.

rosesandcreme
05-29-2010, 07:49 PM
The recession hurt everyone I think - I understand trying to run a small business! What do you do in the emergency room? It's so great that there are moms and dads on this site. By the way, I've always wanted to try Vibram FiveFingers!!! :)

Shoe
05-29-2010, 08:16 PM
The recession hurt everyone I think - I understand trying to run a small business! What do you do in the emergency room? It's so great that there are moms and dads on this site. By the way, I've always wanted to try Vibram FiveFingers!!! :)

I'm a nurse practitioner, previously a nurse and a paramedic, but I like the expanded role as a NP better (besides, it pays better). It's rarely dull.

I tried out Vibram FiveFingers back in October, after reading Born to Run by Christopher McDougall (http://www.amazon.com/Born-Run-Hidden-Superathletes-Greatest/dp/0307266303/ref=tmm_hrd_title_0) in hopes that it might help with my Achilles' tendinitis. It had gotten to the point that I could barely walk by the end of the day, and really couldn't run at all, despite custom orthotics, and physical therapy. The first few runs in them were awful-my calves hurt horribly...but it didn't aggravate my Achilles at all. As I got used to the change in running style and my calves got stronger, I didn't have any more calf pain and the Achilles' tendinitis hasn't come back at all. I like the feel of the road on my feet, and the sensitivity that you get with them. I like their light weight. I like how they feel. I'm a convert, but they're probably not for everybody because it really does involve a radical change of running stride.

camaro
05-29-2010, 10:44 PM
I'm self-employed as a farmer and do some custom work on the side, too. I'm very fortunate that I don't have a set-in-stone work schedule to follow. Some days I have to work all day and some days my wife works so I become a SAHD. In the meantime and in between time we do the homeschooling work. We're usually up around 7:30am and the homeschool work usually starts around 9:00-9:30am. There are days we work until noon, but often we're done by 11am. If Carla is home I'll leave the boys with her when I go to work or if she's working I'll take them with me if possible. If not, I do the usual work in the home or work out in the shop or in the yard while the boys play (or "help") The end of my work day is quite variable and depends a lot on the season/weather. In the winter I might only work a couple of hours per day feeding cattle, in the summer I might work until the sun gets low enough that it's hard to see. There's a few times I have to head out to bale hay at night, too. In that case I might head out between 9 and 10pm and might work until 2am. On rare occasions I've worked until the sun started to come up again. Although I enjoy the night work it can really wear me out if I do too much of it. The only time I take naps during the day is during haying season when I've been working nights a few times in a row. But on days I'm done at a "normal" time, the kids are usually in bed between 9-9:30pm and Carla and I will stay up until 10 or 11.

Busygoddess
05-30-2010, 03:13 AM
I have my own business. My day generally starts between 6 & 7am. Before we start school for the day, I do some housework & make sure everything we need for school is ready. I'm very involved in the kids' schooling, so I don't often do much else during their school time, except during breaks (usually 1 in the morning, 1 for lunch, then 1 in the afternoon). During breaks, I check email, visit FB, check in at hs forums, etc. I'm generally busy with hsing & working with the kids on dealing with their conditions until 4pm, when I start dinner (we have dinner at 5 & most meals are made from scratch). After dinner, there's more housework to be done, along with various other activities. We go to the library once a week (same day each week) & do the shopping one day a week (same day each week). My dh is in a band. They have band practice once a week & dh works on his schooling 3 days a week. During his school time & band practice, I keep an eye on the kids (make sure they don't bother him), play with the kids (when they aren't out playing with neighborhood kids), entertain company (for me & the kids), read, jot down notes for the books I'm going to write or the articles I'm writing for my site, work on planning & creating materials for the kids' schooling, and do research (for any of the many things I'm researching). My schooling, work on my site, and getting products ready to post in my store get done after everyone else goes to bed. Luckily, since my business is selling supplemental educational materials which I create (mostly created for my kids), much of the work for it is combined with the planning & research I do for the kids' schooling. It's mostly just final touches, prep for sale, that needs to be done at night. My day generally ends around 2 or 3am.

paganmomblog
05-30-2010, 07:52 AM
I am an Accountant and so is my husband, we work with his father in the family practice. When homeschooling started seriously being discussed the first thing I did was talk to my father in law on how I would continue working. We settled on me working from home most days. I will have to go in on occasion to get paychecks written for a few clients (I don't want their checks in my home out of concern of covering my tushy!) but those days we can take off from bookwork and make that a day for the parks or a nature hike or something. I am also picking up freelancing work on the side too.

My day usually starts at 5:30 am and my kids will be up by 7, so that gives me some morning time to get some work done and if need be I can do it in the evenings as well. Since I am incorporating housework as "life skills" for the kids I won't have too much looming over my head. Or at least in theory lol.

leav97
05-30-2010, 10:11 AM
I work FT outside the house in IT. M-F ~50 hours a week. I'm also on call 1 week out of every 7. On call weeks can be a standard 50 hour week or they can be a 90 hour week, depends on the week.

My DH runs 2 businesses. One of which is rather small the other is having a hard time in the economy. He works outside of the house ~2 weekends a month and in the evening from 10-2am. He is also in concert band. He has 16 years of military service and is talking about joining the reserves to finish the last 4.

In the morning I put out handwriting and a maze, dot to dot, or color by number. I try to lay out what needs to be done for history. History is a new addition to the schedule. In the evening I do reading and math. We started science this week. I think it is going to be a weekend activity. There are usually 2 week night where school just doesn't happen because of schedules so we do some work on weekends.

We're going to school year round. Last week I figured out that we could take a week off every month and have more school days then the public schools.

leav97
05-30-2010, 10:17 AM
. I'm a convert, but they're probably not for everybody because it really does involve a radical change of running stride.

Would they work well for someone who is looking to start running and doesn't need to radically change stride?

Shoe
05-30-2010, 10:35 AM
Would they work well for someone who is looking to start running and doesn't need to radically change stride? They might. I think you still have to give it some time to get used to them, unless you're already in the habit of walking and running barefoot a lot. Because essentially that is what Vibram FiveFingers do-they let you have the experience of barefoot running, but give a thick skin to protect against sharp objects. They have absolutely NO support or padding, so it's a different experience. I suggest starting slowly for short distances and working up from there.

On the plus side, I spent less on the VFF than I usually did on conventional running shoes.

inmom
05-30-2010, 10:40 AM
I only work part-time from my home (12-15 hours a week) tutoring math and physics students from high school and college. I'm lucky that (1) I work from home and (2) almost all of my tutoring is in the afternoons and evenings. Also, I only tutor 3-5 kids during the summer. Still, I need to be super-organized.

My day starts around 5:30, I head out for a run, and we're all doing schoolwork by 8:00 or 8:30. I start tutoring around 3:30 and end around 8:00. We attend a weekly co-op, piano lessons, etc, but all of these are scheduled before I tutor. The only tricky part is getting the kids to afternoon and evening events.

My hat is off to those of you who work and homeschool both full time!

inmom
05-30-2010, 10:41 AM
On the plus side, I spent less on the VFF than I usually did on conventional running shoes.

How often do you have to buy them? I run from 15-25 miles a week, and almost always have heel pain. Would you recommend these for that, or do I need to stick with the support of conventional running shoes? Just curious.....

Shoe
05-30-2010, 11:00 AM
How often do you have to buy them? I run from 15-25 miles a week, and almost always have heel pain. Would you recommend these for that, or do I need to stick with the support of conventional running shoes? Just curious.....

I don't know how long they'll last-I bought mine in October and they're still in good shape, but I haven't been running as much as I used to because of time constraints. I have also mostly been running on an indoor track over the winter, which I suspect is less hard on the shoes than outdoor running.

As for whether you should try barefoot or stick with conventional supportive shoes...that's a tough one. I had been buying expensive shoes and paid for custom orthotics after seeing a podiatrist and several physical therapy treatments for my heel pain (primarily Achilles' tendinitis but a bit of plantar fasciitis). It helped in my day to day activities, but I still couldn't run without pain. If you're thinking of trying nearly barefoot running for a medical reason, you might want to talk with your primary care provider/orthopedic surgeon/podiatrist first (though many are absolutely opposed to the whole idea-be warned). I would also do some on-line research, Googling "Barefoot running" and "Vibram FiveFingers". I found Chris McDougall's book Born to Run (http://www.amazon.com/Born-Run-Hidden-Superathletes-Greatest/dp/0307266303) both a fascinating read with a great story, but also useful information regarding barefoot running.

The other thing that has really been useful in treating my heel is the Strassburg Sock (http://www.thesock.com/howitworks.html) - a soft sock/splint that I wear at night that has helped a lot.

rosesandcreme
05-30-2010, 04:53 PM
Nice to know there are so many others in similar boats! My husband and I both work from home (in a general sense), but we also both travel at different times of the month for a week or two at a time, so when one is traveling, our nice little schedule falls apart. We usually get up around 4:30, go to the gym or meditate at home, the kids are up around 6 or 6:30, breakfast, then I start teaching and taking care of them (one is too young for school) around 8 or 9. My husband goes into his home office and locks himself away until lunch time, when I am done with the schooling, then after lunch, the kids go down for a couple hours for nap. That is the first time during the day that I have a chance to make phone calls, do emails, and even think about work. When they are back up, I start preparing dinner, and usually I don't get back to my own work until 6 or 7, when my husband is done with his job and can take over the kids. Usually between 9 and 11 is the quietest best time to get stuff done for me. Cleaning and housework often gets in the way of this schedule though, and usually gets left to the weekends. :)

JinxieFox
05-31-2010, 08:43 AM
This topic is of great interest to me right now, as I am in the midst of a changing family dynamic (the D-word...). This means I will have to return to work by the end of the year.

My goal is to continue to homeschool. I am thinking of setting aside some work for my son to do on his own during the day with his nanny, but that I will sit down with him in the evenings and/or on weekends to accomplish book work and projects. Does anybody else do it this way? Any other single or divorced parents working and homeschooling? How does it work for you?

Snoopy
05-31-2010, 01:01 PM
This topic is of great interest to me right now, as I am in the midst of a changing family dynamic (the D-word Oh, Wendy, I'm sorry to hear that. I have been in that situation and it sucked but also I'm happier now than I was then, so keep your eyes on the future. I don't work from home and I wasn't homeschooling at the time so I don't have any advice for you in that regard, but regarding the divorce, my best advice is to put all the hurt aside and to resolve to remain as friendly as possible with your STBX (soon to be ex) for the sake of your child, however hard that may be. I am the child of a horrible divorce and I was determined to not put my kids through the same hell and while I still want to rip my ex's throat sometimes, remaining friendly with him has made our kids' experience much less painful and they are happier kids knowing that their parents communicate and have their best interests at heart. (((HUGS)))

StartingOver
05-31-2010, 02:00 PM
This topic is of great interest to me right now, as I am in the midst of a changing family dynamic (the D-word...). This means I will have to return to work by the end of the year.

My goal is to continue to homeschool. I am thinking of setting aside some work for my son to do on his own during the day with his nanny, but that I will sit down with him in the evenings and/or on weekends to accomplish book work and projects. Does anybody else do it this way? Any other single or divorced parents working and homeschooling? How does it work for you?

I was a single parent the first time around. We did school on weekends, and in the evening. For much of my work I could take the children along. ( family business ) It worked out pretty well, they could do independant work while I worked. We schooled 4 years this way. I won't say it was easy, but if the kids really want to homeschool it can be done.

JinxieFox
05-31-2010, 07:37 PM
Thanks Nathalie. The friendly part is the easiest part! We're doing a good job of that.

Jana, I won't be able to take my son to work with me (I'm a paralegal), but I have a reliable nanny and my son is at an age where he will do some work on his own. It is good to know that others have done this and managed just fine. :)

paganmomblog
05-31-2010, 09:27 PM
Is there anyway to work from home as a paralegal? I know lots of companies are going to that sort of thing these days, maybe you can find someone who would work with you on that?

Shoe
06-01-2010, 02:02 AM
This topic is of great interest to me right now, as I am in the midst of a changing family dynamic (the D-word...).Wendy, I haven't been in that position, so can't offer you any advice. But I do wish you all the best and hope that everything works out well.

JinxieFox
06-01-2010, 04:59 AM
Hi Angela, I won't be working from home, no. But that's fine. I feel very reassured that homeschooling and working full time are not mutually exclusive. :)

Busygoddess
06-01-2010, 06:56 AM
Thanks Nathalie. The friendly part is the easiest part! We're doing a good job of that.

Jana, I won't be able to take my son to work with me (I'm a paralegal), but I have a reliable nanny and my son is at an age where he will do some work on his own. It is good to know that others have done this and managed just fine. :)

Sorry to hear about your divorce. I'm glad that you're able to be friendly with the ex. That really will make things easier on your child. It's also good that you have someone you can trust to take care of him while you work. When I was a single working mom, I had some bad daycare experiences before I found a good daycare. I never homeschooled when I was a single mom, but I'm sure you'll do fine. One of the great things about homeschooling is that you can do it whenever - evenings, weekends, 2 am (if you're a night owl), whenever. It'll be challenging, but being a mom is always a challenge. Your son's lucky to have a mom who's willing to homeschool in addition to the challenges of being a single working mom. Good luck with this new journey.

dottieanna29
06-01-2010, 01:53 PM
I've only been a SAHM for about 5 years now, after 20+ years of working full time. I too went through the big-D but wasn't homeschooling at the time. I agree about keeping communication open and friendly - definitely makes things easier. I hope your STBX doesn't give you any grief about continuing to homeschool - if you can try and get something from him in writing that shows he supports homeschooling - even if its an email that discusses curriculum or something relaxed and general. That can help a lot to show that he supported it if he ever tries to say he doesn't/didn't.

Sometime next year I expect to return to working part time at home. We're currently redoing our house and when its done we expect to have 12 x 20 foot dedicated school room/play room and a very large fenced in yard. We always talked about starting a home daycare when we finally got the new house but we have some issues with regards to scheduling - I need to drop dd off at school at 7:30 am (about 1/2 hour), pick up at 2:30 pm (about 1/2 hour), drive to dance 2 days a week at 4:30 (about an hour round trip), we go away a LOT of weekends, DH travels internationally a few times a year (not a lot but still needs to be considered). Our new plan is to start a Mom's Morning Out/Preschool program. Around here daycares are only full time/preschools have set schedules and are very expensive (average $10-20/hour). In talking to parents at younger dd's Y class and Mom's Club there is a need for a program that's just 1 or 2 mornings a week, doesn't require a full year commitment (as preschools do) and isn't so expensive. Someplace to leave younger children while shopping, going to doctor's appointments or homeschooling older kids, etc. So, we thought about opening a program that runs Monday through Thursday (each child can do 1 to 4 days a week), 9 am to noon, $20.00 a day, weekly or monthly payments. I don't need to make a ton of money - just enough to help with some of the house expenses. I can have 5 kids at a time (in addition to mine) so, if at capacity, could make $400 a week and it wouldn't interfere with my kids schooling or family time. I'm provisionally certified in Elementary Education and can get licensed by the state.

Snoopy
06-02-2010, 12:31 AM
I can have 5 kids at a time (in addition to mine) so, if at capacity, could make $400 a week and it wouldn't interfere with my kids schooling or family time. I'm provisionally certified in Elementary Education and can get licensed by the state. Sounds like you have a plan, lady! I hope it all works out for you :)

jessicalb
06-03-2010, 09:46 AM
I do graphic design, web design, animation, pretty much whatever I can do (or teach myself to do) from home that people want done. I usually get up between 6 and 8, set up a list for Alex's school, and start working. When Alex gets up he has a task list and then he starts school, usually between 8 and 10. I take breaks whenever he needs help, or when we are doing oral work or reading aloud. His schoolwork is usually completed between 2 and 6ish (it only runs late when he chooses to dawdle and has gotten up late). I tend to work pretty much all the time that I am home except for those breaks for school and a couple hours in the evening, and then Alex is in bed by 10 and I am off to bed between 10 and 12. We have a lot of out of the house activities, too, that take me away from my desk. When we have a lot going on and I have a lot of work, I get up earlier and stay up later. It can be tough and I often feel like I need about 8 more hours in every day. It's so worth it, though!

BPier12
06-03-2010, 12:23 PM
Our new plan is to start a Mom's Morning Out/Preschool program. Around here daycares are only full time/preschools have set schedules and are very expensive (average $10-20/hour). In talking to parents at younger dd's Y class and Mom's Club there is a need for a program that's just 1 or 2 mornings a week, doesn't require a full year commitment (as preschools do) and isn't so expensive

I used a program like this for about six months when DS was 2 and it was a lifesaver. He went one morning a week and it was just what I needed to have a little breathing room and the ability to get some errands done on my own. I wish you the best of luck with this and I bet you will have parents beating down your door!

Topsy
06-05-2010, 10:46 AM
I work at home ~25 hours per week doing this site, and online marketing work (all related to homeschooling). I get up around 6 each a.m., and get house chores/exercise/etc done until around 9. 9-12 is dedicated work time. In the afternoons, we usually do errands or outside classes or field trips or just spend time together. I try to fit in another hour of work before supper, and then yet another hour after supper. Late evenings are spent with the hubster or we will all do something as a family.

Did I miss anything? Oh yeah. The homeschooling! ;) Because my boys are unschooled, they are handling their education pretty much for themselves these days. My youngest son still uses Time4Learning for math and some for language arts. My oldest used YourTeacher.com for math this past year. If they have more intense studies, or things that require my input or help, we generally work on those in the afternoons.

The whole kit-n-kaboodle of our schedule will probably be changing drastically this coming year, though, as my oldest will be taking dual enrollment courses at our local community college. I have no idea what things will look like after we get him signed up. But that's the great thing about this adventure...you never know what road it is going to take you down!!

RahRah
06-06-2010, 12:21 PM
Since DS, who will be six in August, was born, I've stayed home - but recently opened my own business since I had an idea that allows me to bring DS to work with me, homeschool him, and still take care of home, hubby and all that without much change in our lives.....I opened a play-discover-learn center in our town which sorely lacked anything remotely like it....hired a full-time director and two part-timers and it's going well.....the place is like a HS fantasyland really - science, math manipulatives, arts & crafts, pretend, etc. - so most of our time during the week is there, wtih DS learning a lot with the things I've filled the center with and the classes we offer and I have good help running it, so I don't have to be there all the time also....to me it's a win-win - and DH is happy it's not really changed much at home - when he has a weekend off, I schedule me off, when he takes vacation, I schedule me for vacation, etc.

Snoopy
06-06-2010, 06:12 PM
Since DS, who will be six in August, was born, I've stayed home - but recently opened my own business since I had an idea that allows me to bring DS to work with me, homeschool him, and still take care of home, hubby and all that without much change in our lives.....I opened a play-discover-learn center in our town which sorely lacked anything remotely like it....hired a full-time director and two part-timers and it's going well.....the place is like a HS fantasyland really - science, math manipulatives, arts & crafts, pretend, etc. - so most of our time during the week is there, wtih DS learning a lot with the things I've filled the center with and the classes we offer and I have good help running it, so I don't have to be there all the time also....to me it's a win-win - and DH is happy it's not really changed much at home - when he has a weekend off, I schedule me off, when he takes vacation, I schedule me for vacation, etc.
Ooooh, what a great idea, i'd love it if we had something like this in town! Did you have any business experience when you started this?

RahRah
06-07-2010, 08:37 AM
Ooooh, what a great idea, i'd love it if we had something like this in town! Did you have any business experience when you started this?

Prior to having DS, I was a business strategist for fortune 50 corp's.....used that experience to identify the unmet need, traveled to research (with DS) similar facilities, hammered out the business plan and waited, waited, waited for the right space to do it (that and I needed the money to start).....DS loves it, he's our little ambassador when families arrive to play - and I love it because I can have DS with me and now have a ton of things to use to HS him - it's like combining work with play, doesn't get better than that!

RahRah
06-07-2010, 08:39 AM
Ooooh, what a great idea, i'd love it if we had something like this in town! Did you have any business experience when you started this?

BTW - where in FL are you (region)? I may know of some places that might be similar to what I'm doing......we visited a few in FL a year ago.

Snoopy
06-07-2010, 08:26 PM
BTW - where in FL are you (region)? I may know of some places that might be similar to what I'm doing......we visited a few in FL a year ago. Well, I think you had a really smart idea! We're in Central Florida, around Orlando.

RahRah
06-08-2010, 10:42 AM
Well, I think you had a really smart idea! We're in Central Florida, around Orlando.

In Sebring you have the Children's Museum of the Highlands - basic exhibits, but solid programming - I think their target is K to 5th grade (if I remember correctly)

Explorations V is iin Lakeland - good exhibits, basic programming, relatively inexpensive to visit (I think it was $5 per person)

If you don't mind the drive, Great Explorations is in St. Pete....good exhibits, good programming.

You probably already know about the Orlando Science Center.

Snoopy
06-08-2010, 01:15 PM
In Sebring you have the Children's Museum of the Highlands - basic exhibits, but solid programming - I think their target is K to 5th grade (if I remember correctly)

Explorations V is iin Lakeland - good exhibits, basic programming, relatively inexpensive to visit (I think it was $5 per person)

If you don't mind the drive, Great Explorations is in St. Pete....good exhibits, good programming.

You probably already know about the Orlando Science Center. Yeah, I kind of hate the OSC actually. It used to be very good but not so much recently. We have a membership to MOSI in Tampa because we like that one better. We definitely love Explorations V although it is for younger kids but Noah and I were just talking about going there this summer. Tampa used to have Kid Town (or was it Kid City?) that was next door to the Lowry Park Zoo and that one was hands down our favorite. When they closed it, I wanted to buy a big piece of land where I live and relocate all the little buildings to it and open my own Kid Town. That would be awesome. I'll have to check out Great Explorations in St Pete. It's probably 2.5 hours from here but for a summertime field trip it's not too bad. Thanks for all the feedback! Are you in FL too?

Elena
06-12-2010, 09:57 AM
I'm on an online instructor for a college. I usually teach 3 courses, so it's a minimum of 21 hours per week. I usually start my work at 9 at night and stay up late. I try to use time on the weekend to catch up, but it seems we are always so busy so it doesn't work out that way! It can be exhausting-- sometimes I feel there is just no downtime. I have 4 girls: 8, 5, 3, and 6 months. I am up a lot at night with the 6 mo. old. My husband suggests sometimes I quit, but how often does one find a job like this . . .I'm actually using my degree, can work from home, and can make my own hours? I know things will get easier around here in a few years (well, I hope!) and then I may even get work done during the day.

We unschool, so during the non-winter months, this means I try to be out of the house as much as possible. If we're home, I tend to get veeeery sleepy, which is a bad thing!

MamaB2C
06-14-2010, 12:12 PM
I work from home, but have to be available to answer customer calls from 9-5. Hubby works 2 part time jobs, from 5am-9am then 10am to 2pm. DS is with various caretakers (my mom, DH's mom or the next door neighbors) from 10-2. I am very, very fortunate to have family around that wants to help and enjoys him. They all teach him things too, though informally! My mom and he spend time at the library, he gardens with the neighbors, his 94 yo great grandma lives with my MIL and reads to him.

Kiddo is only 4, but I do reading with him in the mornings, and DH does math with him in the evenings. Everything else we are opportunistic about; watching nature and science shows, hiking and camping, using maps during our travels, etc.

Snoopy
06-14-2010, 08:47 PM
I work from home, but have to be available to answer customer calls from 9-5. Hubby works 2 part time jobs, from 5am-9am then 10am to 2pm. DS is with various caretakers (my mom, DH's mom or the next door neighbors) from 10-2. I am very, very fortunate to have family around that wants to help and enjoys him. They all teach him things too, though informally! My mom and he spend time at the library, he gardens with the neighbors, his 94 yo great grandma lives with my MIL and reads to him.

Kiddo is only 4, but I do reading with him in the mornings, and DH does math with him in the evenings. Everything else we are opportunistic about; watching nature and science shows, hiking and camping, using maps during our travels, etc. Sounds like you have a great support system! I'm happy you're able to balance work and homeschooling as well :)

bairdmomma
06-21-2010, 10:24 AM
I'm a community organizer. I am fortunate because most of my "work" is done through the phone or email from home. When I have to visit a site, I can usually bring the kids. I found having a flexible schedule, both professionally and in homeschooling, we are able to get most things done when we want to. I chose my line of work with my kids in mind, so I wouldn't have to make as many of the tough decisions and (expenses!) that full-time working mothers often have to make (working either inside/outside of the home, that is-all moms work for sure). Just because you work outside the home or run your own business doesn't mean you can't homeschool-where there's a will, there's a way! That doesn't mean it'll be easy, but a life designed by YOU sometimes isn't. Good luck!

Riceball_Mommy
06-22-2010, 11:13 AM
I'm not sure if I really count under this, but I am in the beginning stages of my career as an artist. Right now my pay is sporadic at best. I'm mostly working on building up my portfolio right now. I have been submitting my work to literary/art magazines, basically anyone how publishes art and looks like I might be a good fit (and sometimes some that might not). I am waiting to get a reference photo for a commission and then I'll be working on that (yay!). I also just submitted my work online for a show in DC.

Snoopy
06-22-2010, 12:01 PM
I'm not sure if I really count under this, but I am in the beginning stages of my career as an artist. Right now my pay is sporadic at best. I'm mostly working on building up my portfolio right now. I have been submitting my work to literary/art magazines, basically anyone how publishes art and looks like I might be a good fit (and sometimes some that might not). I am waiting to get a reference photo for a commission and then I'll be working on that (yay!). I also just submitted my work online for a show in DC. Good luck, Jess!

Museling
06-22-2010, 01:38 PM
I work as a chef at a local live theatre on Thursdays-Sunday in the evening. Mike works a regular 8-5 so I've got basically everyday open. I am going to be going back to school in the fall so things might get a little tricky but hopefully I'll be able to pick up courses that won't conflict with Mike's or my schedule (and we won't have to get a sitter). What is nice is that if need be, I can take Logan with me to the theatre on Thursdays...everybody loves him up there and he likes seeing the cool stuff that mommy gets to do.

Riceball_Mommy
06-22-2010, 05:26 PM
Good luck, Jess!

Thank you :)

sb12345
07-09-2010, 10:16 AM
I own a daycare from home.

My nephews are part of it, they are 8 and 3.
I have two other children, 7 and 10, who come everyday from 2-7 or 3-6 depending on the day.

I will be homeschooling my children along with my nephews, so I don't really consider them apart of my daycare work, so I only work about 21 hours a week. Their parents have given me the permission to afterschool them though, so that is always fun. I help them with their homework, and then whatever they had trouble with I will do examples over and over until they understand. It is basically free tutoring since I only charge the parents daycare rates.

jsneuser
07-21-2010, 02:15 PM
I work full time 3 nights a week. My husband has been home the last two years but just started working. He's never been the primary educator- he's an awesome dad and reads to the kids regularly but needs a lot of coaching to do schoolwork with them. That said, I usually end up doing it. I don't mind though as I'm a bit of a control freak and like to know what they're doing. We have a very eclectic style and are un-schoolers at heart. There are just a few things -RRR- that I like to sit down and talk about. I try to take them out of the house, wether it be in our backyard, the grocery store, or a museum, as often as possible. My schedule means I have to sleep part of most days but I make the most of my waking time. What makes homeschooling more difficult than anything else is little brother- we have a 1yo and he demands a lot of attention. We usually don't sit down for schoolwork unless he's asleep or his Dad is home to keep him occupied.

Suzakin
08-30-2010, 08:39 PM
I work full time outside the house and on top of that, I am a single parent who attends college as well. (Don't tell the men in white coats as they may come for me.) I am homeschooling a 12yo son. He has 'chores' and 'responsibilities' during the day while I am at work. He is EXTREMELY independent and LOVES being at home versus school. He is allowed to hang out in the afternoon such as play video games, watch TV, see friends etc. Once I get home, usually about 4, he knows that is time to get down to business. We HAVE to work as a team to get dinner, do schoolwork, housework etc. When I do schoolwork, he does schoolwork. This is my first year, we'll see how well it works.

Sarbare0704
09-01-2010, 07:39 PM
Wow Susan! That is amazing you accomplish so much! Makes me feel like quite the slacker here!

lilypoo
05-17-2011, 01:07 AM
I am on an extended, indefinite hiatus but I ran a portrait studio from my home since late-2005. I tried to do most of my "on the computer" work (editing, ordering, website, marketing, research, etc.) late at night once the kids were in bed. I also went back to school in 2008 and took two online classes at a time until last summer--did my schoolwork at night when I could. Sometimes I would work in the evenings or on weekends but the family always ended up pretty cranky if I worked or studied when they were around me! ;) I'm glad to have a break from both, actually, and plan to pursue writing and combine photography with that. I write a little column for a local online paper and would like to expand that over the next couple years. I need to get my life in order first (my mom passed away late March and things are kind of crazy) and thankfully my dh is supportive. My photography business was never really profitable, so I appreciate his patience and hope that some day I'll have an income!

Sally Keskey
05-17-2011, 11:13 AM
Good to see I wont be the only one working and home schooling. I work part time as a breastfeeding counselor with WIC.

Laina
05-17-2011, 02:11 PM
I teach online classes and edit/consult with publishing companies--all my work is done at home. I work about 20 hours per week on average, but on a bad week it can be closer to 35. We don't have money for childcare, so I just work during downtime in the afternoons or in the evenings and weekends when my husband comes home. It's not always easy, but we've made it work, and for me it sure beats working full-time. Next year will be my first year full-on homeschooling, but I don't anticipate it will be too much harder than being home with the kids all day like I am now. I will try to cut back on the jobs I take when our financial situation gets a little better--I'm trying to position us to be in a good place financially (car paid off, money in bank) for the start of the school year in September.

ksb427
05-24-2011, 09:47 PM
Currently I work 3 days in the office and one day at home as a year-round marketing associate (social media, manage website, photographer) for a summer camp. Once I start homeschooling in August, I will either do the same schedule or do two days at home and two days in the office. Luckily the directors are fully on board and are excited about my homeschooling the boys. I'll be able to bring them to work with me - where they can explore base camp, look for native American artifacts, help feed the trout, help with the farm (farm to table program) and more. I think we'll be able to swing this.

ScottiO
05-27-2011, 01:08 AM
I am hoping to start homeschooling my 12 year old this fall. I also have an almost 2 year old and a 6 month old. I own/run an online business that is quite time consuming. I do currently waste a lot of time so hopefully once I have to focus and get my priorities in order I'll be able to do it all!

lattekittn
05-30-2011, 11:17 PM
I work full time as a Biology teacher for an online High School. It has been quite the juggling act, and I definitely do not have a set schedule yet, but we are working on it. Some days I fantasize about sending the boys to PS and how much work I could accomplish during the day, but then I realize how much I would miss them! So we are giving it a shot, taking it one year at a time, and trying not to get in over our heads.

tonyahunting
05-31-2011, 04:06 PM
I work full time as a respiratory therapist. full time is 3 days a week. i just had a baby this weekend, and when i go back to work i am considering going per diem which would bring me to two days a week just saturday and sunday. my husband works a radiology tech mon-fri. i would love to work from home or own my own business but i need to make what i make as a therapist which is alot so it is unlikely i could find something on that level. so, for now this should work!

JinxieFox
05-31-2011, 06:35 PM
Well, since I remarried, my life did not end up changing that much (other than the move from Korea to England, and having my son every 4 months, instead of 24/7, 365 days a year).

I am an author and writer. When my son is in our home, I do most of my work in the evening, after we have brushed our teeth and settled in for the night. Things are much quieter then, and everybody is winding down. If something needs to get done, however, my son understands that I need time to work at any hour of the day. Of course, I always carry a notebook to the playground or the Youth Center on base (or I bring my laptop if there is an outlet available); my work travels fairly easily.

When my son is not with me, my day is pretty much 100% devoted to writing, after I get my housework done. Because I set my own pace, sometimes it is much more challenging to be disciplined about it, but publishers' and editors' deadlines tend to help keep me on track. ;)

JenniferJ
06-08-2011, 08:01 AM
How often do you have to buy them? I run from 15-25 miles a week, and almost always have heel pain. Would you recommend these for that, or do I need to stick with the support of conventional running shoes? Just curious.....

My husband is a triathlete and he is currently training for IronMan Fl. He was having heel pain and talked to one of the docs that he works with about it. They told him to be sure he wore shoes with heels (meaning no flip flops, boots, etc.) He got some VFF and after about a week in them his pain was gone. That's about all he wears now. He does still do some training in his conventional running shoes though. I would say try it and see if it helps your pain. I would say start slow though. He did say he gets a few "hot spots" when he runs in them, but his mileage is outrageous! It's nothing for him to go out and run 15-20 miles a day. I think I'll stick to my 15-25 a week. LOL Good luck! If you get some, I'd like to know how you like them. I've been thinking about getting some for myself.