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View Full Version : What's your favorite cookbook?



dragonfly
02-14-2012, 04:52 PM
...And why?

Mine is The Fanny Farmer Cookbook. I like the simple, old-fashioned recipes that help me with all the basics, without getting too creative with ingredients. Sometimes I look at recipes in other books, and realize I'll have to spend about $50 just getting the exotic ingredients required.

I like it simple. It's easier for me to substitute things to make a recipe gluten free, vegetarian, or dairy free, or to add a spice or two of my own.

Accidental Homeschooler
02-14-2012, 05:56 PM
Mine is The New Basics Cookbook by Rosso and Lukins. I have never made anything from it that wasn't good and I am NOT a great cook.

farrarwilliams
02-14-2012, 06:02 PM
Fresh Every Day by Sara Foster - I am completely obsessed with her.

dbmamaz
02-14-2012, 06:40 PM
i actually use the web the most now - allrecipes and simplyrecipes are big ones, and of course a few gluten free sites like glutenfreegoddess. i have a few recipes i've used forever, each one seems to be from a different book, just about.

AddlepatedMonkeyMama
02-14-2012, 07:14 PM
I picked up my Joy of Cooking right out of college and it taught me all my basic cooking skills--everything from hard boiled eggs to kneading bread. I bought Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything" a couple of years ago and have started using it more. I also have a Cook's Illustrated book of 30 minute recipes that I really like. Oh, and "Not Your Mother's Slowcooker Cookbook" for crockpot recipes.

farrarwilliams
02-14-2012, 07:17 PM
That Test Kitchen 30 minutes cookbook is one of my standards too, MonkeyMama! A lot of the things I cook every week - stir fry, skillet pasta dishes, skillet baked chicken, and a bunch of others come straight out of there. And, of course, How to Cook Everything is my standard.

But when I want to be inspired and amazed, Sara Foster it is. :)

MrsLOLcat
02-14-2012, 09:41 PM
It depends on the recipe. For breads, cinnamon rolls, breakfasts, etc., I love my 1923 cookbook put together by a bunch of Kansas church ladies. For international cuisine, I heart the Internet and my America's Test Kitchen cookbook. For everyday stuff... Cooking Light's "Fresh Fod Fast" is one of my favorites, as well as all the recipes I've invented myself or which have been handed down through the years. I do have a Better Homes & Gardens cookbook, too, that I use every once in a while.

Accidental Homeschooler
02-14-2012, 09:56 PM
I have a church cookbook from my SIL (small, rural MN, Lutheran church). It is great for things like pie and recipes with rubarb.

kewb22
02-15-2012, 07:19 AM
I do use the internet for a lot of recipes but I have a couple of staple cookbooks.

Heart of the Home by Susan Branch
The Joy of Cooking
The Moosewood Cookbook

pnctink
02-15-2012, 11:31 AM
I use food.com most often, but I also usually pull out the Betty Crocker cookbook I bought when we first got married (it had rings to neatly add recipes). Then close behind are The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook and Betty Crocker's Best Bread Machine Cookbook.

Crabby Lioness
02-16-2012, 12:54 PM
I picked up my Joy of Cooking right out of college and it taught me all my basic cooking skills--everything from hard boiled eggs to kneading bread. I bought Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything" a couple of years ago and have started using it more. I also have a Cook's Illustrated book of 30 minute recipes that I really like. Oh, and "Not Your Mother's Slowcooker Cookbook" for crockpot recipes.

I cooked for 40 years before I found Joy of Cooking, and it was still a revelation to me how much better written it is than anything else I've ever seen. Is there an up-to-date cookbook that can compare? I'd really like to find one.

Dh loves The Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook. It's a favorite of mine as well.

AmyButler
02-16-2012, 08:31 PM
I love church and organization cookbooks, and I have a number of them, but I think my absolute favorite was one of my Mom's that has all the substitutions people used during rationing in the back of it!

farrarwilliams
02-16-2012, 10:34 PM
I cooked for 40 years before I found Joy of Cooking, and it was still a revelation to me how much better written it is than anything else I've ever seen. Is there an up-to-date cookbook that can compare? I'd really like to find one.



See, I have the opposite experience... I started with The Joy of Cooking when I first was married and was so glad when I discovered better ones. Have you ever seen that movie Julie and Julia? In it, there's a scene (no idea how true it is) where Julia Child meets Irma Rombauer and she turns out to be a total drunk who never tested most of her recipes. It cracked me up because I had no many bad experiences cooking things from there before I discovered Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything and America's Test Kitchen's Best Recipe, both of which, for me, are hands down better. But I know some people swear by The Joy of Cooking... so maybe it's just me?

Crabby Lioness
02-17-2012, 12:35 AM
See, I have the opposite experience... I started with The Joy of Cooking when I first was married and was so glad when I discovered better ones. Have you ever seen that movie Julie and Julia? In it, there's a scene (no idea how true it is) where Julia Child meets Irma Rombauer and she turns out to be a total drunk who never tested most of her recipes. It cracked me up because I had no many bad experiences cooking things from there before I discovered Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything and America's Test Kitchen's Best Recipe, both of which, for me, are hands down better. But I know some people swear by The Joy of Cooking... so maybe it's just me?

Perhaps you had a different edition? There were several, and the recipes become more contemporary over time.

I researched the lives of Irma and Marion Rombauer, and I have never seen any evidence to support that view of her, certainly not in what Julia Child wrote about her.

Punchie
04-11-2012, 06:28 PM
How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. It gives you all the basics and "how to's" (which you can then expand off of).

beaz
05-17-2012, 12:20 PM
Delia Smith's Complete cooking course, classic edition. It taught me how to cook, is always my go-to for recipes that work, and has a lot of sentimental value for me. I can't even look at it without thinking of my late mother.

Batgirl
05-18-2012, 12:06 AM
Julia Child & Tom Douglas for when I want to get fancy. For everyday, right now I'm into Supper's on the Table, Come Home. She lists out all the recipes and grocery lists for each week, and it's Midwestern style comfort food. No-brain, kid-friendly cooking is just what I need right now. Pear halves in lime jello, anyone?

patriciahe
05-18-2012, 06:42 AM
I love Cooking Light The Essential Dinner Tonight, and for fresh and fast Cooking Light Fresh Food Fast

bcnlvr
05-18-2012, 11:02 AM
1. Nourishing Traditions
2. Primal Blueprint


We don't eat grains, legumes, or vegetable oils. These two cookbooks really got me started. We eat lots of plants, animals, and butter/lard.

Pefa
05-18-2012, 03:10 PM
Cuisines of the Axis of Evil by Chris Fair. Nothing like a little international politics with your carne asada.

I never follow recipes so in as much as they offer reasonable proportions or combinations of flavors I use 1923 Fanny Farmer, 1942 Joy of Cooking, Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking and the Moosewood cooks at home. My kids swear by test kitchen/cook's illustrated, but I find them too fussy.

Stella M
05-20-2012, 10:34 PM
Nigella's Feast and How To Be A Domestic Goddess.

SherilynO
05-20-2012, 11:54 PM
Simply in Season.

Airen
05-21-2012, 12:27 PM
I love my binder Better Homes and Gardens! It's my go-to when I'm in a rut and need simple stupid.
Clean Eating if I'm feeling fancy, but I have to sub a lot of the fancier things.
Allrecipes.com if a have somethign and don't know what to do with it... like the huge bunch of celery. I hate celery,,,

linseym
07-26-2012, 03:44 PM
My go to is of course the Joy of Cooking. It has everything and is just a perfect starting off point.
Almost as much as JoC I refer to my Larousse Gastronomique. Also the Culinaria series is good too. I love the pictures and the history as well. I have from that series Germany, France, Spain, Italy and Greece.
Michael Ruhlman's Charcuterie book is a must have for anyone who is interested in the art of charcuterie. I love it.

Saraswati
07-26-2012, 06:29 PM
The Silver Spoon is my main cookbook - I can never go wrong with Italian cuisine with my kids! I keep Joy on hand for last second substitute ideas. And for my "I don't have time to cook dinner" nights, I often turn to Williams-Sonoma Weeknight Fresh + Fast By Kristina Kidd. It has some tasty recipes that only take minutes to throw together. For someone that collects cookbooks, those are the three that are used regularly.

Cheers :)

Paula
07-29-2012, 10:16 AM
Disney's Family Cookbook, circa 199something. A friend of mine raved about her homeschooling mama cooking memorable, fun dishes and desserts from this book so I bought it and love it.

It has tons of easy recipes and imaginative creations for kids, like Paw Print Cubcakes, as well as educational tips and suggestions.

Tee
07-29-2012, 12:12 PM
The internet. I love to search for several recipes for the same thing and pull them up and kind of mesh them all together/tweak them to suit me. I also have an two old self published women's' group cookbooks - one from the 70s and one from the 40s that I use for baking.

Elizabeth
08-07-2012, 01:28 PM
I also use the web (allrecipes and simplyrecipes) but I love cookbooks in general. I really like my America's Test Kitchen Healthy Family cookbook(my number one!), Cooking Light Complete Cookbook, Betty Crocker's New Choices Cookbook and Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything.

lafemmedesfemmes
08-08-2012, 03:06 PM
i'm one who swears by "joy of cooking". joy and i are on a first-name basis! :-D i also like bittman's "how to cook everything". "nourishing traditions" was an eye-opener for me, and i refer to it on a semi-regular basis.

christina in lawrenceville

Avalon
08-08-2012, 05:43 PM
Disney's Family Cookbook, circa 199something. A friend of mine raved about her homeschooling mama cooking memorable, fun dishes and desserts from this book so I bought it and love it.

It has tons of easy recipes and imaginative creations for kids, like Paw Print Cubcakes, as well as educational tips and suggestions.

I have this one, too! My sister brought it over once, and I never gave it back. It has a good selection of basic muffins, cookies, snacks, and stuff like that. I also like Pioneer Woman's cookbook, and Steamy Kitchen, and I also have a Betty Crocker that I use for a few old-fashioned type things.

Most of the time, I don't use a recipe at all, call my brother for ideas and instructions (he's a total foodie, home gourmet type of guy), or look something up on Tasty Kitchen or allrecipes.com.

Freedom
10-02-2012, 07:27 PM
If the internet goes down and I've got an abundance of something from a local farmer I pull out The Illustrated Encyclopedia of American Cooking. If I have a ton of peaches, I just look under p for peaches and it gives a snippet of info on season availability, buying, cleaning, storing, canning, preparation, serving and follows with about 50 different recipes.

dbmamaz
10-02-2012, 10:58 PM
Holy cow, I have that book! I sold book door to door the summer after my 2nd year at college, and that was one of the books we were selling, and I still have it - almost 20 years later! I dont use it much, i find that some of the recipes are better than others, but I still use a meatball recipe from that book (its under spaghetti though). Curious where you got it?

if i'm looking for a recipe not on the internet, i have several other books i'd use first, really. Depending on what i'm looking for.

Juno
10-03-2012, 12:51 AM
Moosewood cookbook is my favorite I actually eat meat, I gasp just add it to the recipes. They are mostly all good.

Freedom
10-03-2012, 08:48 AM
[QUOTE=dbmamaz;103392]Holy cow, I have that book! I sold book door to door the summer after my 2nd year at college, and that was one of the books we were selling, and I still have it - almost 20 years later! I dont use it much, i find that some of the recipes are better than others, but I still use a meatball recipe from that book (its under spaghetti though). Curious where you got it?

I bought it off of a door to door College student (male)!

dbmamaz
10-03-2012, 10:44 AM
I bought it off of a door to door College student (male)!
:cool: cool!

zcat
10-05-2012, 02:45 PM
My current favorite is 5 Spices, 50 Dishes: Simple Indian Recipes Using Five Common Spices. I haven't made every recipe but every one I've tried so far has been tasty, easy to make, and not hard to find the ingredients. The dishes are mostly new to me so they are interesting to prepare and eat.

On the internet I like Food.com. I have found many good recipes there.
I like Saveur magazine (http://www.saveur.com/). I love the articles and recipes from all over the world and the great pictures. We always find something we want to try in every issue.

Freedom
12-07-2012, 08:18 AM
[QUOTE=zcat;103664]My current favorite is 5 Spices, 50 Dishes: Simple Indian Recipes Using Five Common Spices. I haven't made every recipe but every one I've tried so far has been tasty, easy to make, and not hard to find the ingredients. The dishes are mostly new to me so they are interesting to prepare and eat.

I've got to hunt down that Indian Cookbook. Thanks for sharing this info.

ajohnn
12-10-2012, 04:25 AM
i like online cooking books to read i read it lots of books " How to Bake " " Jamie's 15-Minute Meals " and more i read it......its very interesting books we will make it easy cooking with easily tips save your time....

mpippin
12-10-2012, 05:42 AM
How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (and How to Cook Everything Vegetarian). He means it. Everything. Simply cooked. Easily understood. I find those two books to be fabulous launch pads for my cooking endeavors, and they are the books I pull off the shelf when I need to remember how to make something.